Compagnie Francaise de Navigation a Vapeur v. Louisiana Board of Health

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Compagnie Francaise de Navigation a Vapeur v. Louisiana Board of Health
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued October 29–30, 1900
Decided June 2, 1902
Full case name Compagnie Francaise de Navigation a Vapeur v. Louisiana Board of Health
Citations 186 U.S. 380 (more)
22 S. Ct. 811; 46 L. Ed. 1209
Prior history Compagnie Francaise de Navigation à Vapeur v. State Board of Health, 25 So. 591 (La. 1899)
Court membership
Chief Justice
Melville Fuller
Associate Justices
John M. Harlan · Horace Gray
David J. Brewer · Henry B. Brown
George Shiras Jr. · Edward D. White
Rufus W. Peckham · Joseph McKenna
Case opinions
Majority White, joined by Fuller, Gray, Brewer, Shiras, Peckham, McKenna
Dissent Brown, joined by Harlan

Compagnie Francaise de Navigation a Vapeur v. Louisiana Board of Health, 186 U.S. 380 (1902), was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held constitutional the involuntary quarantine of individuals suffering from communicable diseases.[1]

Facts[edit]

In 1898, the plaintiff's ship SS Britannia was to put in at New Orleans with over 400 passengers aboard. Upon arrival, New Orleans was under cordon sanitaire, and state authorities prohibited the Britannia from unloading passengers or cargo despite no evidence of disease aboard.[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bonnie, R.J. et al. Criminal Law, Second Edition. Foundation Press, NY: 2004, p. 663
  2. ^ Whelan, Allison M. (November 2013). "That's My Baby: Why the State's Interest in Promoting Public Health Does Not Justify Residual Newborn Blood Spot Research without Parental Consent". Minnesota Law Review. 98 (1): 419. Retrieved 3 January 2016.   – via HeinOnline (subscription required)
  3. ^ Compagnie Francaise de Navigation a Vapeur v. Louisiana Board of Health, 186 U.S. 380, 381 (1902).

External links[edit]