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Conjunctivitis

Conjunctivitis known as pink eye, is inflammation of the outermost layer of the white part of the eye and the inner surface of the eyelid. It makes the eye appear reddish. Pain, scratchiness, or itchiness may occur; the affected eye may be "stuck shut" in the morning. Swelling of the white part of the eye may occur. Itching is more common in cases due to allergies. Conjunctivitis can affect both eyes; the most common infectious causes are viral followed by bacterial. The viral infection may occur along with other symptoms of a common cold. Both viral and bacterial cases are spread between people. Allergies to pollen or animal hair are a common cause. Diagnosis is based on signs and symptoms. A sample of the discharge is sent for culture. Prevention is by handwashing. Treatment depends on the underlying cause. In the majority of viral cases, there is no specific treatment. Most cases due to a bacterial infection resolve without treatment. People who wear contact lenses and those whose infection is caused by gonorrhea or chlamydia should be treated.

Allergic cases can be treated with mast cell inhibitor drops. About 3 to 6 million people get conjunctivitis each year in the United States. In adults, viral causes are more common. People get better in one or two weeks. If visual loss, significant pain, sensitivity to light, signs of herpes, or if symptoms do not improve after a week, further diagnosis and treatment may be required. Conjunctivitis in a newborn, known as neonatal conjunctivitis, may require specific treatment. Red eye, swelling of the conjunctiva, watering of the eyes are symptoms common to all forms of conjunctivitis. However, the pupils should be reactive, the visual acuity normal. Conjunctivitis is identified by redness of the conjunctiva. Except in obvious pyogenic or toxic/chemical conjunctivitis, a slit lamp is needed to confirm the diagnosis. Examination of the eyelid conjunctiva is more diagnostic than examination of the scleral conjunctiva. Viral conjunctivitis is associated with an infection of the upper respiratory tract, a common cold, or a sore throat.

Its symptoms include excessive itching. The infection begins in one eye, but may spread to the other eye. Viral conjunctivitis manifests as a fine, diffuse pinkness of the conjunctiva, mistaken for a ciliary infection of the iris, but corroborative signs on microscopy numerous lymphoid follicles on the tarsal conjunctiva, sometimes a punctate keratitis are seen. Allergic conjunctivitis is inflammation of the conjunctiva due to allergy; the specific allergens may differ among patients. Symptoms result from the release of histamine and other active substances by mast cells, consist of redness, swelling of the conjunctiva and increased production of tears. Bacterial conjunctivitis causes the rapid onset of conjunctival redness, swelling of the eyelid, a sticky discharge. Symptoms develop first in one eye, but may spread to the other eye within 2–5 days. Conjunctivitis due to common pus-producing bacteria causes marked grittiness or irritation and a stringy, greyish or yellowish discharge that may cause the lids to stick together after sleep.

Severe crusting of the infected eye and the surrounding skin may occur. The gritty or scratchy feeling is sometimes localized enough that patients may insist that they have a foreign body in the eye. Common bacteria responsible for nonacute bacterial conjunctivitis are Staphylococcus and Haemophilus species. Less Chlamydia spp. may be the cause. Bacteria such as Chlamydia trachomatis or Moraxella spp. can cause a nonexudative but persistent conjunctivitis without much redness. Bacterial conjunctivitis may cause the production of membranes or pseudomembranes that cover the conjunctiva. Pseudomembranes consist of a combination of inflammatory cells and exudates and adhere loosely to the conjunctiva, while true membranes are more adherent and cannot be peeled away. Cases of bacterial conjunctivitis that involve the production of membranes or pseudomembranes are associated with Neisseria gonorrhoeae, β-hemolytic streptococci, Corynebacterium diphtheriae. C. diphtheriae causes membrane formation in conjunctiva of unimmunized children.

Chemical eye injury may result. Alkali burns are worse than acidic burns. Mild burns produce conjunctivitis. Litmus paper may be used to test for chemical causes; when a chemical cause has been confirmed, the eye or eyes should be flushed until the pH is in the range 6–8. Anaesthetic eye drops can be used to decrease the pain. Irritant or toxic conjunctivitis is marked by redness. If due to a chemical splash, it is present in only the lower conjunctival sac. With some chemicals, above all with caustic alkalis such as sodium hydroxide, necrosis of the conjunctiva marked by a deceptively white eye due to vascular closure may occur, followed by sloughing off of the dead epithelium. A slit lamp examination is to show evidence of anterior uveitis. Inclusion conjunctivitis of the newborn is a conjunctivitis that may be caused by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis, may lead to acute, purulent conjunctivitis. However, it is self-healing. Infective conjunctivitis is most caused by a virus. Bacterial infections, other irritants, dryness are common cau

The Work Tour

The Work Tour was the debut headlining theatre tour by English-Irish girl group The Saturdays. The tour became the group's first headlining tour; the tour opened on 2 June 2009, lasted for 24 shows, finishing on 7 July 2009. The tour featured all of their songs from their debut album, a medley of covers, two new songs that would feature on their untitled, up-coming second studio album Wordshaker; the tour was announced official by The Saturdays, to further promote their 2008 album Chasing Lights. The tour was named after the group's fifth single Work; the fastest venue to sell out was the Brighton Dome. The concert began with a video interlude, which saw the group members individually walk down the catwalk on the set of the work video, this was played to an instrumental version of the Wideboys Remix of their single Up; the intro to their debut single If This Is Love began, one by one different coloured lights appeared on each girl in turn. This was followed by Set Me Off. Keep her was next to be performed, before the girls brought chairs on stage to sing the comic relief single Just Can't Get Enough.

They performed Wordshaker, unheard, was to feature on their upcoming album of the same name. A mowtown version of Why Me Why Now followed before the girls had a costume change. An extended intro of fall began; this was followed by an acoustic cover of Madcon's song Beggin' which came before an acoustic version of Chasing Lights. A video Interlude, was played showing their video flip highlights, before they returned to stage to perform a covers medley, which consisted of the songs. One Shot, another song to appear on their second album, was performed next. Lies continued the show, followed by the tour's title song, Work. Work had an extended outro. Next, writing appeared on the video screen, asking if the crowd wanted more, before a musical interlude began signalling the start of the encore segment of the show with a selection of clips from the'Issues' video; the girls returned to the stage to perform the song, before ending the show with Up, as they danced with umbrellas. Pixie Lott Mini Viva Jessie Malakouti The Catwalk costume: Black AnoraksIf This Is Lovecostume: Silver Outfits Set Me Off Keep Her Just Can't Get Enough Wordshaker Why Me, Why Now?

Fall Extended Intro Costume: White Dresses Fall Beggin' Chasing Lights Video Flips Montage costume: Black Tops, Ripped Jeans Shut Up And Drive/I Kissed A Girl/So What One Shot Lies WorkEncoreGlitter Outfits in Different Colours Issues UpA Vanessa had a foot injury. McFly's Dougie Poynter joined the girls on stage, played bass during "Just Can't Get Enough". None of the shows was filmed for televised release/viewing; the only available footage is fan filmed videos uploaded on to YouTube. The group used the setlist from the Work Tour when they performed at the 2009 iTunes Festival, London. Six of the tracks featured on an EP released by the band called iTunes Live: London Festival'09. Three additional tracks were iTunes bonus tracks for the band's second album, Wordshaker

Evan Lloyd Vaughan

Evan Lloyd Vaughan was a Welsh politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1774 to 1791. Vaughan was the son of Richard Vaughan MP and his wife Margaret Lloyd, daughter of Sir Evan Lloyd of Bodidris, Denbighshire, he was educated at Eton College from 1725 to 1727 and was admitted at St Johns College, Cambridge in 1728. He was Constable of Harlech castle from July 1754 and High Sheriff of Denbighshire in 1766-7, he succeeded his brother to Corsygedol in 1775. Vaughan was unwilling to stand at Merioneth in the 1768 general election when his brother William Vaughan declined re-election. J. Pugh Pryse was returned instead and when Pryse's died in January 1774, Vaughan was still reluctant to stand; however he was returned unopposed as Member of Parliament for Merioneth in the by-election on 24 February 1774. At the 1774 general election soon after he had to fight a contested election, which showed the strength of the Vaughan interest. All his subsequent elections in 1780, 1784 and 1790 were uncontested.

There is no record of his having spoken in the House before 1790. Contemporary parliamentary historian Thomas Oldfield described him in 1816 as “one of the last independent members of the old constitutional school”. Vaughan died unmarried on 4 December 1791

Baahubali 2: The Conclusion (soundtrack)

Baahubali 2: The Conclusion is the soundtrack of the 2017 Indian epic historical film of the same name. The original soundtrack in Telugu was composed by MM Keeravani while the songs were sung by Daler Mahendi, Sony, Sreenidhi, V. Srisoumya, Kaala Bhairava and Keeravani. For the Malayalam soundtrack, Mankompu Gopalakrishnan composed the lyrics while Vijay Yesudas, Shweta Mohan and Yazin Nizar sang the songs; the Hindi soundtrack featured a song by Kailash Kher. Lahari Music acquired the audio rights of the Telugu and Tamil soundtracks in late October 2016 for an amount of ₹45 million, the highest sum paid by the company in its 37 years of operation; the audio rights of the Hindi and Malayalam soundtracks were acquired by Zee Music Company and Manorama Music respectively. The audio launch of the soundtrack, which doubled as the pre-release event of the film, was held on 26 March 2017 at YMCA grounds with Karan Johar as the chief guest. Among the various events that took place at the launch, Keeravani sang a song dedicated to S.

S. Rajamouli, the director of the film. Due to the success of the predecessor's album, there were expectations that the second installment of the album would be successful. All lyrics are written by Madhan Karky. All lyrics are written by Mankombu Gopalakrishnan. All lyrics are written by Manoj Muntashir; the Conclusion received positive reviews. Hemanth Kumar of Firstpost writes, "It wouldn't be an exaggeration to say that every song in the album is infused with so much emotion and love that it's tough to handpick the best of the lot." Further commenting on the theme, he writes, "One of the key aspects of the album is that each song is tied to a particular situation in the film and it's unfair to alienate the song from what it tries to convey." Bollywood Life rates the soundtrack 3.5/5 and writes, "Just as expected, MM Keeravani provides a majestic score for Baahubali 2, that suitably fits its grandeur and epicness." India-West gives a rating of 3.5/5 and comments that the songs doesn't have the "instant appeal" and "lasting quality" of the songs in The Beginning but writes, "Overall, this is a better than the good score that will in all probability be perfect for the film."

Vikram Venkateswaran of BloombergQuint claims that the songs are "infinitely better" than that of The Beginning and writes, "In keeping with the theme of the movie, the songs are simple, yet grand. The arrangement is devoid of unnecessary frills." Prachi Kulkarni of India writes, "The audio juke box... will make you feel the wholeness of the film way before you see it on the silver screen." Apoorva Nijhara of Pink Villa gave it a rating of 85/100 and writes, "From the setting of the musical arrangements to the singers, everything is just perfect." Baahubali 2: The Conclusion Baahubali: Music from the Motion Picture Baahubali

Indian Mall

Indian Mall was an enclosed shopping mall located at the Highland Drive-Caraway Road intersection in Jonesboro, United States. It was located just north of the junction of Interstate 555 and Arkansas Highway 1. For more than thirty years, Indian Mall was the only shopping center serving Northeast Arkansas; the nearby opening of The Mall at Turtle Creek in 2006 drew many tenants away from Indian Mall, including the Dillard's and JCPenney anchors. Indian Mall became a dead mall, losing all of its tenants except for Sears, an insurance office and a GameStop which remained for close to two years; as of February 2008, the mall has been closed off except for Sears, will be redeveloped. The Dillard's Clearance Center has closed. Indian Mall opened in 1968 as a shopping destination for northeastern Arkansas, it was the second mall in the state. Indian Mall derived its name from the name of nearby Arkansas State University's mascot; the mall first opened as a small shopping center with Blass, TG&Y, a supermarket called Stimson's.

The mall sustained heavy damage during a series of tornadoes that struck the city on May 27, 1973. J. C. Penney was added in 1976. TG&Y closed in the 1980s; the supermarket space was converted to a food court in the 1980s as well. Indian Mall was used to host various events including athletic team appearances and signings as well as fundraisers for different organizations across the state and country. In 1998, shortly after the Westside Middle School massacre, Indian Mall received significant press coverage, as the location where Rev. Phillip McClure, a local pastor, started ministering to people; until 2006, Indian Mall was the only mall serving northeastern Arkansas. It featured a variety of national chain tenants, including The Gap, Sam Goody, KB Toys, Dollar Tree; as early as 1994, rumors circulated on the arrival of a newer, larger mall to serve the expanding city. Two mall proposals surfaced, one of the proposals being made by Indian Mall's owner, Warmack & Company. Warmack's proposal, dubbed Southern Hills Mall, was to feature a similar tenant roster to the Indian Mall.

Southern Hills Mall was slated to include newer, larger stores for JCPenney, Dillard's, Sears, in addition to a new Target. Meanwhile, David Hocker & Associates, a company based in Kentucky, was proposing a new mall, called The Mall at Turtle Creek. Due to a variety of issues, Warmack's Southern Hills Mall never materialized. However, The Mall at Turtle Creek did open in 2006, including a new Dillard's and a new JCPenney among its anchors; as a result, JCPenney closed its store at Indian Mall, the Dillard's at Indian Mall was converted to a clearance center. Many of the older mall's tenants re-located to the Mall at Turtle Creek; the site where Southern Hills Mall would have been built has since been put up for sale. In August 2007, MBC Holdings entered into talks with the Warmack Company to purchase the Indian Mall. MBC Holdings plans on destructing most of the site and developing it into additional retail space; the deal is contingent on several areas. One is the city of Jonesboro's willingness to allow more retail development and plans for the stores that still occupy the Indian mall and have multi-year leases.

MBC Holdings LLC closed on the property in late 2007. The mall closed February 2008, was demolished in March 2012. In June 2013, a request was approved to tear down the mall and replace it with a Kroger store

Ronnie Cutrone

Ronnie Cutrone was an American pop artist known for his large-scale paintings of some of America's favorite cartoon characters, such as Felix the Cat, Pink Panther and Woody Woodpecker. Cutrone's paintings are colorful and less challenging than those of his contemporaries; as Andy Warhol's assistant at the Factory atop the Decker Building from 1972 until 1980, Cutrone worked with Warhol on paintings, prints and other concepts co-opting Warhol's earliest work as well as works by Roy Lichtenstein and others, until distilling those myriad influences into the style a few critics labeled "Post-Pop." He exhibited at the Niveau Gallery in 1979 with a Scottish artist called Mike Gall who showed paintings of Snoopy and Minnie mouse, the Pink Panther and a small series of Peter Rabbit paintings. In this exhibition no evidence of the style the critics would call "Post-Pop" could be seen in Cutrone's work. Victor Hugo was the other artist, featured in this three man group show, called "Three New New York Artists".

In 1980, Cutrone's place was taken by Jay Shriver so that Cutrone could concentrate on his own painting. He achieved international acclaim with his first post-Warhol show. At the same time Mike Gall died in a car crash in Scotland following the death of his father. Together with Kenny Scharf, Cutrone revived the comic strip in painting. By using established comic characters such as Woody Woodpecker and Felix the Cat, Cutrone rephrased themes of originality and authorship, of low-brow taste and fine art which makes him directly indebted to Pop Art of early Sixties, his use of bright and fluorescent colours encouraged Andy Warhol’s return to such hues of heightened artificiality. "Everything is a cartoon for me," Ronnie Cutrone says. "The ancient manuscripts are taken seriously but they are cartoons."Ronnie died in 2013 at his home in Lake Peekskill, NY. Cutrone's works have been exhibited at: Whitney Museum, Museum of Modern Art, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles and fine art galleries internationally.

Cutrone was married four times. His first two marriages were to makeup artist Gigi Williams. In 1986 he married Kelly Cutrone, his third wife was an Israeli woman, Einat Katav, that marriage ended in divorce. "Ronnie Cutrone, a Man of Another, Cooler City", NYTimes.com