Consumer debt

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

In economics, consumer debt is the amount owed by consumers, as opposed to that of businesses or governments. In macroeconomic terms, it is debt which is used to fund consumption rather than investment. It includes debts incurred on purchase of goods that are consumable and/or do not appreciate.[1]

In recent years, an alternative analysis might view consumer debt as a way to increase domestic production, on the grounds that if credit is easily available, the increased demand for consumer goods should cause an increase of overall domestic production. The permanent income hypothesis suggests that consumers take debt to smooth consumption throughout their lives, borrowing to finance expenditures (particularly housing and schooling) earlier in their lives and paying down debt during higher-earning periods.

Personal debt is on the rise, particularly in the United States and the United Kingdom. However, according to the US Federal Reserve, the US household debt service ratio is at the lowest level since its peak in the Fall of 2007.[2]

The most common forms of consumer debt are credit card debt, payday loans, and other consumer finance, which are often at higher interest rates than long-term secured loans, such as mortgages. The amount of debt outstanding versus the consumer's disposable income is expressed as the consumer leverage ratio. On a monthly basis, this debt ratio is advised to be no more than 20 percent of an individuals take-home pay.[3] The interest rate charged depends on a range of factors, including the economic climate, perceived ability of the customer to repay, competitive pressures from other lenders, and the inherent structure and security of the credit product. Rates generally range from 0.25 percent above base rate, to well into double figures. Consumer debt is also associated with predatory lending, although there is much debate as to what exactly constitutes predatory lending.

Long-term consumer debt is often considered fiscally suboptimal. While some consumer items such as automobiles may be marketed as having high levels of utility that justify incurring short-term debt, most consumer goods are not. For example, incurring high-interest consumer debt through buying a big-screen television "now", rather than saving for it, cannot usually be financially justified by the subjective benefits of having the television early. On the other hand, personal finance advisers like Robert Kiyosaki encourage a more liberal attitude towards taking on debt if it can be leveraged into a small business or real estate.

In many countries, the ease with which individuals can accumulate consumer debt beyond their means to repay has precipitated a growth industry in debt consolidation and credit counseling.

Measurement[edit]

A country's private debt can be measured as a 'debt to GDP ratio', which is the total outstanding private debt of its residents divided by that nation's annual GDP. A variant is the consumer leverage ratio, which is the ratio of debt to personal income.

List of countries[edit]

List of countries by consumer debt as % of GDP
Country/Region 1960[4] 2016[5]
Afghanistan  – 003.6
Albania  – 034.5
Algeria  – 023.5
American Samoa  –  –
Andorra  –  –
Angola  – 021.0
Antigua and Barbuda  – 048.3
Argentina  – 014.0
Armenia  – 048.9
Aruba  –  –
Australia  – 142.9
Austria  – 085.6
Azerbaijan  – 026.6
Bahamas, The  – 068.2
Bahrain  –  –
Bangladesh  – 044.4
Barbados  –  –
Belarus  – 025.9
Belgium  – 064.7
Belize  – 056.8
Benin  – 021.8
Bermuda  –  –
Bhutan  – 046.5
Bolivia  – 064.2
Bosnia and Herzegovina  – 054.3
Botswana  – 032.3
Brazil  – 062.2
British Virgin Islands  –  –
Brunei Darussalam  – 044.3
Bulgaria  – 053.6
Burkina Faso  – 026.6
Burundi  – 016.7
Cabo Verde  – 063.0
Cambodia  – 069.7
Cameroon  – 020.8
Canada  –  –
Cayman Islands  –  –
Central African Republic 011.2 012.8
Chad 003.5 010.2
Channel Islands  –  –
Chile 022.1 112.1
China  – 156.7
Colombia 022.9 047.1
Comoros  – 026.5
Congo, Dem. Rep.  – 007.8
Congo, Rep. 022.2 025.0
Costa Rica 027.0 059.3
Cote d'Ivoire  – 022.7
Croatia  – 061.6
Cuba  –  –
Curacao  –  –
Cyprus  – 230.1
Czech Republic  – 051.8
Denmark 044.5  –
Djibouti  –  –
Dominica  – 051.5
Dominican Republic 005.8 028.4
Ecuador 025.6 029.4
Egypt, Arab Rep.  – 034.1
El Salvador  – 045.6
Equatorial Guinea  – 019.1
Eritrea  –  –
Estonia  – 072.6
Ethiopia  –  –
Faroe Islands  –  –
Fiji  – 089.9
Finland 036.8 095.5
France 020.0 097.6
French Polynesia  –  –
Gabon 008.2 013.6
Gambia, The  –  –
Georgia  – 062.0
Germany  – 077.5
Ghana 004.6 019.6
Gibraltar  –  –
Greece 012.2 107.7
Greenland  –  –
Grenada  – 056.1
Guam  –  –
Guatemala 010.1 034.3
Guinea  – 012.9
Guinea-Bissau  – 007.1
Guyana 011.2 045.5
Haiti  – 018.3
Honduras 009.9 056.3
Hong Kong SAR, China  – 203.8
Hungary  – 034.9
Iceland 046.9 087.3
India 007.9 049.8
Indonesia  – 039.4
Iran, Islamic Rep. 012.9  –
Iraq 008.5  –
Ireland 030.1 049.2
Isle of Man  –  –
Israel 013.5 065.4
Italy  – 086.1
Jamaica 015.7 032.1
Japan 056.3 185.0
Jordan  – 075.1
Kazakhstan  – 034.3
Kenya  – 032.9
Kiribati  –  –
Korea, Dem. People’s Rep.  –  –
Korea, Rep. 005.7 143.3
Kosovo  – 039.3
Kuwait  –  –
Kyrgyz Republic  – 021.2
Lao PDR  –  –
Latvia  – 067.4
Lebanon  – 111.9
Lesotho  – 017.5
Liberia  –  –
Libya  –  –
Liechtenstein  –  –
Lithuania  – 043.0
Luxembourg  – 100.1
Macao SAR, China  – 118.1
Macedonia, FYR  – 047.4
Madagascar  – 013.2
Malawi  – 010.5
Malaysia 008.9 124.0
Maldives  – 037.3
Mali  – 025.4
Malta  – 087.1
Marshall Islands  –  –
Mauritania  –  –
Mauritius  – 096.4
Mexico 020.6 035.0
Micronesia, Fed. Sts.  – 023.4
Moldova  – 030.6
Monaco  –  –
Mongolia  – 058.7
Montenegro  – 051.2
Morocco 012.0 065.4
Mozambique  – 034.5
Myanmar 006.2 020.7
Namibia  – 056.7
Nauru  –  –
Nepal 01.0 081.0
Netherlands 018.4 111.2
New Caledonia  –  –
New Zealand 015.5  –
Nicaragua 015.4 038.7
Niger  – 013.7
Nigeria 003.7 015.7
Northern Mariana Islands  –  –
Norway 032.7 145.0
Oman  – 075.6
Pakistan 011.1 016.2
Palau  –  –
Palestinian territories  – 042.0
Panama 017.8 091.0
Papua New Guinea  –  –
Paraguay 009.1 054.4
Peru 012.5 036.2
Philippines 012.0 044.7
Poland  – 054.8
Portugal 039.5 112.2
Puerto Rico  –  –
Qatar  – 079.4
Romania  – 028.2
Russian Federation  –  –
Rwanda  – 021.2
Samoa  – 080.1
San Marino  –  –
Sao Tome and Principe  – 026.4
Saudi Arabia  – 058.0
Senegal 014.8 033.1
Serbia  – 044.1
Seychelles  – 026.9
Sierra Leone 002.8 005.6
Singapore  – 132.9
Sint Maarten (Dutch part)  –  –
Slovak Republic  – 057.1
Slovenia  – 047.4
Solomon Islands  – 039.0
Somalia  –  –
South Africa  – 144.7
South Sudan  –  –
Spain 031.4 111.8
Sri Lanka 007.3 046.0
St. Kitts and Nevis  – 056.5
St. Lucia  – 086.8
St. Martin (French part)  –  –
St. Vincent and the Grenadines  – 050.8
Sudan 08.9 08.9
Suriname  – 033.3
Swaziland  – 021.6
Sweden 038.2 129.6
Switzerland 096.0 177.7
Syrian Arab Republic 025.3  –
Tajikistan  – 019.2
Tanzania  – 014.3
Thailand 010.1 147.4
Timor-Leste  –  –
Togo  – 039.3
Tonga  – 038.1
Trinidad and Tobago 008.5 041.3
Tunisia  – 081.2
Turkey 017.7 070.3
Turkmenistan  –  –
Turks and Caicos Islands  –  –
Tuvalu  –  –
Uganda 006.5 013.7
Ukraine  – 047.3
United Arab Emirates  – 085.9
United Kingdom 017.6 135.9
United States 070.9 192.7
Uruguay 031.0 028.2
Uzbekistan  –  –
Vanuatu  – 068.5
Venezuela, RB 014.0  –
Vietnam  – 123.8
Virgin Islands (U.S.)  –  –
Yemen, Rep.  –  –
Zambia  – 013.0
Zimbabwe  –  –

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Consumer Debt Definition". Investopedia. Retrieved August 24, 2011. 
  2. ^ US Federal Reserve. "Household Debt Service and Financial Obligations Ratios". Household Debt Service and Financial Obligations Ratios. Retrieved December 4, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Alternatives to Filing for Bankruptcy". www.moneymanagement.org. Retrieved 2016-07-29. 
  4. ^ https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/FS.AST.PRVT.GD.ZS
  5. ^ https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/FS.AST.PRVT.GD.ZS

External links[edit]