Convention on the High Seas

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Convention on the High Seas
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Signed29 April 1958
LocationGeneva, Switzerland
Effective30 September 1962
Parties63 states (at 2013)
LanguagesChinese, English, French, Russian and Spanish
Convention on the High Seas at Wikisource
http://legal.un.org/ilc/texts/instruments/english/conventions/8_1_1958_high_seas.pdf

The Convention on the High Seas is an international treaty which codifies the rules of international law relating to the high seas, otherwise known as international waters.[1] The treaty was one of four treaties created at the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS I).[2] The treaty was signed on 29 April 1958 and entered into force on 30 September 1962.[3]

As of 2013, the treaty had been ratified by 63 states.[4] The Convention on the High Seas was superseded by UNCLOS III, which introduced several new concepts to the law of maritime boundaries including Exclusive Economic Zones.

Provisions[edit]

High seas highlighted in dark blue.

The treaty is divided into 37 articles:

Article 1: Definition of "high seas".

Article 2: Statement of principles

Article 3: Access to the sea for landlocked states

Articles 4–7: the concept of a Flag State

Article 8: Warships

Article 9: Other ships in government service

Articles 10–12: Safety, rescue

Article 13: Outlawing transport of slaves at sea

Articles 14–21: Piracy

Article 22: Boarding of merchant ships by warships

Article 23: Hot pursuit, that is, pursuit of a vessel across borders for the purposes of law enforcement

Articles 24–25: Pollution

Articles 26–29: Submarine cables and pipelines

Articles 30–37: legal framework, ratification, accession

References[edit]