Dagaz

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Name Proto-Germanic Old English
*Dagaz Dæg
"day"
Shape Elder Futhark Futhorc
Runic letter dagaz.svg
Unicode
U+16DE
Transliteration d
Transcription d
IPA [ð] [d]
Position in
rune-row
23 or 24

The d rune (ᛞ) is called dæg "day" in the Anglo-Saxon rune poem. The corresponding letter of the Gothic alphabet 𐌳 d is called dags, this rune is also part of the Elder Futhark, with a reconstructed Proto-Germanic name *dagaz.

Its "butterfly" shape is possibly derived from Lepontic san[1].

Rune poems[edit]

The name is only recorded in the Anglo-Saxon rune poem, since the rune was lost in the Younger Futhark:

Rune Poem:[2] English Translation:

Anglo-Saxon
Dæg byþ drihtnes sond, deore mannum,
mære metodes leoht, myrgþ and tohiht
eadgum and earmum, eallum brice.


Day, the glorious light of the Creator, is sent by the Lord;
it is beloved of men, a source of hope and happiness to rich and poor,
and of service to all.

Inscriptions[edit]

On runic inscription Ög 43 in Ingelstad, one Dagaz rune is translated using the Old Norse word for "day" as the personal name Dagr.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ David Stifter, "Lepontische Studien: Lexicon Leponticum und die Funktion von san im Lepontischen", in: Akten des 5. Deutschsprachigen Keltologensymposiums, Zürich, 7.–10. September 2009. Hrsgg. Karin Stüber et al. [= Keltische Forschungen, Allgemeine Buchreihe A1], Wien: Praesens Verlag 2010, 359–374
  2. ^ Original poem and translation from the Rune Poem Page Archived 1999-05-01 at the Wayback Machine..
  3. ^ Project Samnordisk Runtextdatabas Svensk - Rundata entry for Ög 43.

See also[edit]