Dawn Hudson

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Dawn Hudson
Born1957 (age 61–62)
Alma materHarvard University
Washington University in St. Louis (did not graduate)
Grenoble Institute of Political Studies (did not graduate)
OccupationActress, movie executive
Known forCEO of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

Dawn Hudson (born 1957) is an American actress and movie executive. She serves as the chief executive officer of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Early life[edit]

Dawn Hudson was born in 1957 in Hot Springs, Arkansas,[1] she attended Harvard University, but took a hiatus to work for Democratic Senator John Little McClellan in Washington, D.C., until she returned to college and graduated.[2] She attended graduate school at the Washington University in St. Louis and the Grenoble Institute of Political Studies in Grenoble, France.[1]

Career[edit]

Hudson served as the President of Film Independent, where she produced the Spirit Awards and the Los Angeles Film Festival.[1]

Hudson has served as the chief executive officer of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences since 2011.[3][4][5] In 2015, she suggested that the new Academy membership rules were not a matter of political correctness.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Keegan, Rebecca (May 6, 2014). "Film academy to consider CEO Dawn Hudson's contract". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 31, 2016.
  2. ^ Cieply, Michael (October 30, 2011). "or the Academy's New Chief, a Balancing Act". The New York Times. Retrieved January 31, 2016.
  3. ^ "BOARD OF GOVERNORS: OFFICERS 2015 - 2016". Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved January 28, 2016.
  4. ^ Block, Alex Ben (March 10, 2013). "Academy CEO Dawn Hudson's Salary Revealed in New Tax Filing". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved January 28, 2016.
  5. ^ Gray, Tim (May 6, 2014). "Academy Renews Dawn Hudson's Contract as CEO". Variety. Retrieved January 31, 2016.
  6. ^ Barnes, Henry (January 27, 2016). "Oscars boss: Academy rules change not driven by political correctness". The Guardian. Retrieved January 31, 2016.

External links[edit]