Disco Dancer (Devo song)

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"Disco Dancer"
Disco 12 us 400.jpg
Single by Devo
from the album Total Devo
Released 1988
Format
Genre
Length 4:14 (album version)
Label
Songwriter(s)
Producer(s) Devo
Devo singles chronology
"Shout"
(1985)
"Disco Dancer"
(1988)
"Baby Doll"
(1988)

"Shout"
(1985)
"Disco Dancer"
(1988)
"Baby Doll"
(1988)
Total Devo track listing
"Baby Doll"
(1)
"Disco Dancer"
(2)
"Some Things Never Change"
(3)
Music video
"Disco Dancer" on YouTube

"Disco Dancer" is a song by the American new wave band Devo, written by Mark Mothersbaugh and Gerald Casale. It was the first Devo single that was released without their most prominent drummer Alan Myers, who was replaced by former Sparks drummer David Kendrick, it was released in 1988 as the first single from their seventh studio album, Total Devo.

Concept[edit]

According to Devo bassist and co-songwriter Gerald Casale: "Me and Mark [Mothersbaugh] had an idea of a like a John Travolta fell into a rip van winkle sleep you woke up the character Travolta in Saturday Night Fever woke up fifteen twenty years later at the world. What a nightmare it would be for him and we thought that was quite humorous."[1] In the commentary for their film The Complete Truth About De-Evolution Mark Mothersbaugh stated that the original influences for this song came from Indian films and music videos, likely the 1982 Bollywood film, Disco Dancer.

Music video[edit]

A video was made for "Disco Dancer," using a slightly remixed version of the track by producer Ivan Ivan, the video footage was recorded from two parties that the band threw, one in New York City and the other one in Los Angeles. The NYC footage was recorded in black & white while the LA footage was in color, with scenes from both parties being cut back and forth in the video which not only gave it an underground feel, but the viewer could also distinguish in each scene where the footage was shot. According to Casale, the video failed to receive airplay after first being aired on MTV's "Smash or Trash?," in which a video was aired and viewers would call in and vote on it. The video was "trashed" and MTV refused to air it after that.[2]

Track listing[edit]

  • 12" Single (Enigma V-75511)
  1. "Disco Dancer (7" Version)" – 4:15
  2. "Disco Dancer (12" Version)" – 6:30
  3. "Disco Dancer (Bonus Beats)" – 4:20
  4. "Disco Dancer (7" Version)" – 4:15
  5. "Disco Dancer (12" Version)" – 6:30
  6. "Disco Dancer (Bonus Beats)" – 4:20
  • 7" Single (Enigma 7 75023-7)
  1. "Disco Dancer (7" Version)" – 4:15
  2. "Disco Dancer (Karaoke TV Version)" – 4:15
  • CD Single (Enigma D3-75511, 7 75511-3)
  1. "Disco Dancer (7" Version)" – 4:15
  2. "Disco Dancer (12" Version)" – 6:32
  3. "Disco Dancer (Bonus Beats)" – 4:26
  4. "Disco Dancer (Karaoke Version)" – 4:26
  • Cassette Single (Enigma 4V-75511)
  1. "Disco Dancer (7" Version)" – 4:15
  2. "Disco Dancer (12" Version)" – 6:30
  3. "Disco Dancer (Bonus Beats)" – 4:20
  4. "Disco Dancer (7" Version)" – 4:15
  5. "Disco Dancer (12" Version)" – 6:30
  6. "Disco Dancer (Bonus Beats)" – 4:20

Chart performance[edit]

Chart Position
US Dance Club Songs[3] 45
US Hot Dance Music/Maxi-Singles Sales 40

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6plEHlqMbk
  2. ^ Devo (2003). The Complete Truth About De-evolution (DVD). Rhino Home Video. 
  3. ^ "allmusic ((( Devo > Charts & Awards > Billboard Singles )))". Billboard. Retrieved 2008-06-22. 

External links[edit]