Duchess of Cambridge

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Duchess of Cambridge
Style Her Royal Highness
Ma'am
Term length As long as married to the Duke of Cambridge
Inaugural holder Caroline of Ansbach

Duchess of Cambridge is the principal courtesy title held by the wife of the Duke of Cambridge. The title is legally gained upon marriage and is forfeited upon divorce. Five of the eight Dukes of Cambridge did not marry or morganate, and thus there are only three Duchesses of Cambridge including the current Duchess, Catherine, wife of Prince William, Duke of Cambridge.

Duchesses of Cambridge[edit]

The three Duchesses of Cambridge (and the dates the individuals held that title) are as follows:

Person Name Birth Marriage Became Duchess of Cambridge Spouse Ceased to be Duchess of Cambridge Death
Caroline Wilhelmina of Brandenburg-Ansbach by Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt.jpg Caroline of Ansbach[a] 1 March 1683 22 August 1705 9 November 1706 Prince George Augustus 11 June 1727
Husband acceded to throne as George II;
became Queen Consort
20 November 1737
Augusta, Duchess of Cambridge - Beechey 1818.jpg Augusta of Hesse-Kassel[b] 25 July 1797 7 May 1818 Prince Adolphus 6 April 1889
Catherine Elizabeth Middleton (colorized).jpg Catherine Middleton[c] 9 January 1982 29 April 2011 Prince William Incumbent

In 1847, Sarah Fairbrother married Prince George, Duke of Cambridge, son of Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge, and Princess Augusta of Hesse-Kassel. Under the Royal Marriages Act 1772, Prince George was required to seek the permission of the British monarch (at that time his cousin, Queen Victoria) to marry, but failed to do so as permission to marry an actress with four illegitimate children by three fathers would never have been given. Sarah could not take the style of Princess of Great Britain or of Her Royal Highness.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Caroline was also Princess of Wales between 1714 and 1727, and later Queen consort of Great Britain and Ireland. Her husband was King George II of Great Britain and his son was King George III of the United Kingdom.
  2. ^ Augusta of Hesse-Kassel was the daughter of Prince Frederick of Hesse-Kassel and Princess Caroline of Nassau-Usingen. His grandmother was Princess Mary of Great Britain, daughter of King George II of Great Britain, she was the wife of Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge.
  3. ^ Catherine Middleton is the daughter of Michael Francis Middleton and Carole Goldsmith. Her great-grandmother was Olive Middleton (née Lupton) who grew up at her family's Potternewton Hall Estate, near Leeds, as had her father and his first cousin Baroness von Schunck (née Kate Lupton). The Duchess's husband is Prince William, Duke of Cambridge.[1][2][3][4][5][6] Her Middleton relatives were reported as having played host to British royalty "as long ago as 1926".[7][8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rayner, Gordon (13 September 2013). "'Middle-class' Duchess of Cambridge's relative wore crown and attended George V's coronation". UK Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 29 September 2016. Two of her father Michael’s relations were baronesses who were invited to successive coronations, and one of them, Baroness Airedale, was photographed wearing a coronet and ceremonial robes on the day of George V’s coronation in 1911.....some of the family wealth trickled down to the Duchess and her siblings through trust funds set up decades ago to pay for the education of members of the family 
  2. ^ "Kate Middleton Biography Duchess (1982-)". A&E Television Networks, LLC. Retrieved 29 September 2016. It was on this job at British Airways that Carole met Michael Middleton, a dispatcher, whose wealthy family hails from Leeds and which has ties to British aristocracy. 
  3. ^ Smith, Sean (24 May 2011). "Kate - A Biography of Kate Middleton". Simon and Schuster. Retrieved 1 May 2016. ...family trusts were set up over 100 years ago..."(Middleton's ) family were upper-middle-class observed a family friend"... 
  4. ^ Gutteridge, Nick (2 July 2016). "PICTURED: Kate's great grandmother and her own extraordinary contribution to Britain's war". Daily Express. UK. Retrieved 9 July 2016. She (Olive Middleton, née Lupton) grew up in opulent surroundings at the family's ancestral seat of Potternewton Hall Estate, near Leeds in Yorkshire, after being born into one of the pre-eminent families of her time. 
  5. ^ Gutteridge, Nick (2 July 2016). "Kate's hero relative died at the Somme after signing up to fight alongside Diana's grandad". Daily Express. Retrieved 2 July 2016. During the war Olive herself served as a volunteer nurse at Gledhow Hall, the ancestral seat of her cousin, Baroness Airedale, which had been converted into a field hospital....Baroness Airedale, (pictured), worked alongside her cousin, Olive Middleton, Kate's great-grandmother... 
  6. ^ Reed, Michael (2016). "Gledhow Hall". House and Heritage - David Poole. Retrieved 15 August 2016. 
  7. ^ Wilson, Christopher (26 July 2013). "The Middletons deserve a title, step forward the Earl and Countess of Fairfax". UK Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 24 June 2016. As long ago as 1926, the Middleton family played host to the Queen's aunt, Princess Mary and another relative ... was a friend of George V 
  8. ^ "Headrow, Permanent House". Leodis – a Photographic Archive of Leeds. City of Leeds UK Gov. Retrieved 24 June 2016. As Chairman of the Leeds General Infirmary, Henry (Dubs Middleton) had played host to Princess Mary when she visited the Leeds General Infirmary in 1932