Eagle On The Hill, South Australia

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Eagle On The Hill
South Australia
Devil's Elbow.JPG
Eagle On The Hill is directly above the tunnel entrance, with the old road winding round from Devils Elbow
Eagle On The Hill is located in South Australia
Eagle On The Hill
Eagle On The Hill
Coordinates34°58′41″S 138°40′20″E / 34.978066°S 138.672305°E / -34.978066; 138.672305Coordinates: 34°58′41″S 138°40′20″E / 34.978066°S 138.672305°E / -34.978066; 138.672305[1]
Established1850
LGA(s)Adelaide Hills Council[1]
Localities around Eagle On The Hill:
Crafers West[1]

Eagle On The Hill is an unbounded locality in the Australian state of South Australia located in the suburb of Crafers West on the western face of the Adelaide Hills overlooking the Adelaide metropolitan area.[1]

The village is located on Mount Barker Road, which was formerly the connection from Adelaide to the South Eastern Freeway. Once the freeway was extended through the Heysen Tunnels in 2000, through the ridge underneath Eagle On The Hill, the locality went into a precipitous decline, it is now a relic of its former self; its restaurant, hotel, bottle shop and service stations have all closed, leaving behind a quiet suburb with a small resident population. Eagle On The Hill is now a very popular spot for downhill speedboarders who travel down the road at speeds close to 65 kilometres per hour.[citation needed]

Hotel[edit]

The now-closed Eagle on the Hill Hotel

The Eagle on the Hill Hotel was built by George Stevenson in 1850 and initially was run as an eating-house,[2] then opened in 1853 as an hotel by William Anderson, who named it Anderson Hotel.[citation needed]

Abraham Fordham was its lessee in 1854, naming it the "Eagle Inn",[3] changing it to "Eagle on the Hill" in 1856.[4] Fordham was found insolvent in 1861 but was able to continue trading until April 1864, when the lease on the "Eagle on the Hill" (better known as "Fordham's")[5] was re-advertised. Fordham, who previously ran a hotel on Grenfell Street, died at the hotel the following August,[6] his wife, Elizabeth Fordham, successfully applied for the licence, and died aged 68 at the hotel in September 1866. Their son, William Robert Fordham (died 1873), next had the licence, then transferred it to James Tighe (died 1876) in January 1869, but the association with the Fordhams continued for many years.[citation needed]

The hotel has twice been ravaged by bushfires. First in 1899; a fire destroyed all of the old hotel with the exception of two rooms. Again on Ash Wednesday (16 February 1983) the hotel suffered, with it being completely destroyed, it was rebuilt and operated with much success until its closure after the construction of the new freeway route which carried the South Eastern Freeway through the Heysen Tunnels instead of up the ridge past the hotel.[citation needed]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Search results for 'Eagle on the Hill, Locu' with the following datasets selected - 'Suburbs and localities', 'Local Government Areas' and 'Gazetteer'". Location SA Map Viewer. South Australian Government. Retrieved 26 December 2018.
  2. ^ "The Toilers of the Hills". South Australian Register. LVIII, (14, 506). South Australia. 11 May 1893. p. 6. Retrieved 29 October 2018 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  3. ^ "East Torrens District Council". South Australian Register. XVIII, (2339). South Australia. 16 March 1854. p. 3. Retrieved 29 October 2018 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  4. ^ "East Torrens". South Australian Register. XX, (2948). South Australia. 14 March 1856. p. 3. Retrieved 29 October 2018 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  5. ^ "Advertising". South Australian Weekly Chronicle. VI, (299). South Australia. 23 April 1864. p. 1. Retrieved 29 October 2018 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  6. ^ "Topics of the Day". The South Australian Advertiser. VII, (1880). South Australia. 5 August 1864. p. 2. Retrieved 29 October 2018 – via National Library of Australia.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)