Eid cuisine

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Eid cuisine sold outside Jiangwan Mosque in Shanghai, China during Eid al-Adha.

Both festivals of Eid celebrated in the Muslim world include special cuisines of the countries and localities.

Eid-ul-Fitr cuisines[edit]

Eid-ul-Fitr is also known as "Sweet Eid" because of the amount and variety of sweet dishes consumed on this occasion celebrating the happy end of Ramadan (which brings the mercy of Allah). India, Pakistan, Iran, Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei and Bangladesh have traditional dishes to celebrate Eid. The breakfast of Eid-ul-Fitr are sweet dishes, including Sheer Khurma, a dish made by cooking saviyaan (a local form of long pasta) with dates, the pasta and dates, cooked separately in milk, are also consumed as breakfast before offering Eid Prayer. Depending on the locality, the types and forms of the cuisine vary but are always sweet dishes; in South Asia, cham cham, Barfi, Gulab Jamun (a ball shaped milk based dessert immersed in a sugar syrup), and different forms of cakes as well as ras malai (a local dish prepared with milk) are popular. These are not only consumed inside houses but also presented to relatives and friends when visiting them on Eid-ul-Fitr. Baklava and other types of pastry type sweets are eaten in Turkey. Ketupat is commonly served during Eid in Indonesia.

Eid-ul-Adha cuisines[edit]

Eid-ul-Adha is the "Salty Eid" because a larger variety of dishes than those served during Eid-ul-Fitr are savoury, including beef or mutton depending on the animal slaughtered in the house. The presents offered to friends, relatives, and the poor of the society include the meat of the slaughtered animal, the fried liver of the animal is used as breakfast and different dishes include different varieties of kebabs (boneless meat that has been meshed and fried or roasted), haleem, Korma, and other varieties. Rice dishes, including different forms of Pulao and Biryani, are also very popular in South Asia.

Kokoreç, which is made from intestines, may also be eaten in Turkey and other Balkan Muslim communities where it is very popular.

Soft drinks are also popular beverages on both these occasions.

See also[edit]

References[edit]