Eighteen Hundred Block Park Road, NW

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Eighteen Hundred Block Park Road, NW
1800 block of Park Road, NW.jpg
Eighteen Hundred Block Park Road, NW is located in Washington, D.C.
Eighteen Hundred Block Park Road, NW
Location 1801-1869 Park Rd., NW.
Washington, D.C.
Coordinates 38°55′57″N 77°2′35″W / 38.93250°N 77.04306°W / 38.93250; -77.04306Coordinates: 38°55′57″N 77°2′35″W / 38.93250°N 77.04306°W / 38.93250; -77.04306
Built 1892-1911
Architect various
NRHP reference # 78003057[1]
Added to NRHP November 15, 1978

The Eighteen Hundred Block Park Road, NW is a collection of ten suburban residences and five carriage houses in the Mount Pleasant neighborhood of Washington, D.C. The houses form an historic district and were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.[1]

History[edit]

Built around the turn of the 20th century, the houses occupy terraces above Park Road, which is a curving cross-town street. They are unique in that they are large, custom-designed house in an area of the city that is primarily made up of row houses.[2] The people who built the houses were businessmen, bankers and other professionals. They employed several prominent local architects who designed the houses in a variety of styles, especially Colonial Revival. The architects include Frederick B. Pyle, Harding & Upman, Appleton P. Clark, Jr., and C.A. Didden & Son.[2]

Architecture[edit]

Most of the houses are two stories and include both frame and brick structures, some of which are monumental in scale. The styles employed provided various textures and materials, including clapboard, shingles and stucco. They feature multiple roof forms, bays and dormers. The houses have large front porches and porticoes that feature ample window openings, columns and balustrades. Fanlight entrances are characteristic on the street.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b National Park Service (2008-04-15). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  2. ^ a b c "District of Columbia - Inventory of Historic Sites". Government of the District of Columbia. Archived from the original on 2012-12-13. Retrieved 2012-10-14.