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Fanny Davenport

Fanny Lily Gipsy Davenport was an Anglo-American stage actress. The eldest child of Edward Loomis Davenport and Fanny Elizabeth Gill Davenport, Fanny Lily Gypsey Davenport was born on April 10, 1850 in London. Most of her siblings were actors, including Harry Davenport, she was educated in the Boston public schools. At age 7, she appeared at Boston's Howard Athenæum as Metamora's child, but her real debut occurred in February 1862 when she portrayed King Charles in Faint Heart Never Won Fair Lady at Niblo's Garden. In February 1862, she appeared in New York City at Niblo's Garden at the age of 12 as the King of Spain in Faint Heart Never Won Fair Lady. From 1869 to 1877, she performed in Augustin Daly's company. Mantell and similar plays, she took over emotional Sardou roles, originated in Europe by Sarah Bernhardt. Her last appearance was at the Grand Opera House in Chicago on March 25, 1898, shortly before her death, her first husband was Edwin B. Price, an actor, they married on July 30, 1879, divorced on June 8, 1888.

On May 18, 1889, she married Melbourne MacDowell. Both marriages were childless. Davenport died September 26, 1898, from an enlarged heart, at her summer home in Duxbury, Massachusetts. Benton, in Mckay and Wingate, Famous American Actors of To-Day Montrose J. Moses, Famous Actor-Families in America, pp. 226–254 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed.. "Davenport, Edward Loomis". Encyclopædia Britannica. 7. Cambridge University Press. Pp. 852–853. This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Gilman, D. C.. New International Encyclopedia. New York: Dodd, Mead. Fanny Davenport picture gallery at NYP Library Fanny Davenport at Find a Grave

Auditor General of Malaysia

The role of the Auditor General of Malaysia is to aid accountability by conducting independent audits on the account of Federal Government, State Government and Federal Statutory Bodies as well as the activities of the Ministry/Department/Agency and Companies under the Federal and State Government. Auditors General of the Federated Malay States / States of the Straits SettlementWilliam James Parke Hume F. W. Talbot George P. Bradney Auditors General of the Colonial AdministrationGeorge P. Bradney L. G. Corney Auditors of the Malayan UnionR. McDonald Director of Audit of the Federation of MalayaR. McDonald C. W. S. Seed Auditors General of the Federation of MalayaH. M. Watson Donald George Bompas Auditors General of MalaysiaDonald George Bompas S. Kandiah Mohd Zain Ahmad Ahmad Noordin Zakaria Ishak Tadin Mohd Khalil Mohd Noor Hadenan A. Jalil Ambrin Buang Madinah Mohamad Nik Azman Nik Abdul Majid Mohd Khalil Mohd Noor Hadenan A. Jalil Ambrin Buang Former Auditors General

Armed

Armed was an American Thoroughbred gelding race horse, the American Horse of the Year in 1947 and Champion Older Male Horse in both 1946 and 1947. He was inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame in 1963. Armed was sired by the great stakes winner Bull Lea, the sire of Citation, his dam was Armful, whose sire was Belmont Stakes winner Chance Shot and whose grandsire was the great Fair Play. Besides being small for his age and headstrong, Armed had the habits of biting and kicking hay out of his handler's pitchfork. Since he was practically untrainable, his trainer, Ben A. Jones, sent him back to Calumet Farm to be gelded and turned out to grow up, he resumed training. His first start was as a three-year-old the following February, he won at Hialeah Park by eight lengths, he won again less than a week but won only once in five more starts and had to be rested due to an ankle injury. Armed raced from 1944 to 1950, finishing with a 41-20-10 record in 81 starts. In 1947 under jockey Douglas Dodson, he defeated U.

S. Triple Crown champion Assault in a match race at Belmont Park and set a track record of 2:01-3/5 for one and one-quarter miles while winning the Widener Handicap and carrying 129 pounds, he repeated as American Champion Older Male Horse and was voted 1947 American Horse of the Year honors. In the Horse of the Year poll conducted by Turf and Sport Digest magazine, he received 151 of a possible 173 votes to win the title from Citation, Stymie and Assault. Armed died in 1964 of an intestinal tumor. In 1963, he was inducted into National Museum of Hall of Fame. In The Blood-Horse ranking of the top 100 U. S. thoroughbred champions of the 20th Century, he was ranked #39. Armed's pedigree TB Library profile of Armed by Avalyn Hunter KY Horsepark Calumet 1947

Anna Haight

Anna Haight, was First Lady of California, being wife of Henry Haight, Governor from 1867 to 1871. Born Anna Bissell on 2 October 1834 in St. Louis to, Captain Lewis Bissell and Mary. Captain Bissell built the house. Lewis Bissell House, now a restaurant and banquet facility, is considered to be the oldest surviving house in St. Louis. Anna met Henry Haight, a San Francisco attorney in St Louis, married him on 24 January 1855, they sailed from New York on 20 February. They had five children, Mary, Henry H. Jr. and Louis. The Haights were the last family to use the Stanford Mansion as Governor's residence. Anna died on 29 March 1898 in Oakland and was buried in Mountain View Cemetery in Oakland

Church rate

The church rate was a tax levied in each parish in England and Ireland for the benefit of the parish church. The rates were used to meet the costs of carrying on divine service, repairing the fabric of the church and paying the salaries of the connected officials. Except for a brief period during the Commonwealth of England in the 17th century, the raising of Church Rates has never been confirmed by statute, it was always a matter of'Common Law'. The compulsory levying of the church rate was abolished by statute in 1868. Chancel repair liability in England however remains enforceable by law; the church rates were set by the churchwardens together with the parishioners, who were duly assembled after proper notice had been posted in the church vestry or the church. The rates thus set were recoverable in the ecclesiastical court, or, if the arrears did not exceed £10 and no questions were raised as to the legal liability, before two justices of the peace. Any payment made out of the rate, not recognised by law destroyed its validity.

The church rate was a personal charge imposed on the occupier of land or of a house in the parish, though it was compulsory, it was difficult to enforce: so in the case of Nonconformists, who had conscientious objections to supporting the Established Church. The objections of the Nonconformists were not only on principle; the Church of England received financial support from Parliament, while Nonconformist congregations were dependent on voluntary contributions. They did not want to have to support another parish as well as their own. Enforcement of the rate was not uniform across the country. Resolutions were passed protesting against the rate, societies to abolish the rate were formed all over the country. In 1836 at a public meeting in London, a central committee, the Church Rate Abolition Society, was formed to co-ordinate the efforts of local abolitionist Societies. In 1837, Parliament made two concessions to the Nonconformists: a more acceptable marriage ceremony, the civil registration of births and marriages.

However, the parish rate remained compulsory until 1868. The Whig leader in the House of Commons, Lord John Russell, supported the rate but in 1856 The Times called the government's attention to what the editor believed was a civil war raging throughout the country on the church rate question. In 1868, the Compulsory Church Rate Abolition Act was passed; this Act made church rates no longer compulsory, but voluntary, with those who were not willing to pay the rate being excluded from inquiring into, objecting to or voting in respect of their expenditure. Parochial church councils may continue to levy voluntary rates by virtue of the Parochial Church Councils Measure 1956. All Church of England Churches within the City of London continue to levy the church rate. Hampstead Parish Church has documented their procedures for raising a voluntary rate, by way of good practice; this article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed.. "Church Rate". Encyclopædia Britannica.

6. Cambridge University Press. P. 348

Vologases III of Parthia

Vologases III was king of the Parthian Empire from 110 to 147. He was the son and successor of Pacorus II. Vologases III's reign was marked by civil warfare. At his ascension, he had to deal with the usurper Osroes I, who managed to seize the western part of the empire, which left Vologases III in control of its eastern parts. After Osroes I violated the Treaty of Rhandeia with the Romans by deposing appointing Parthamasiris as the king of Armenia, the Roman emperor Trajan invaded the Parthian lands seizing the Parthian cities of Seleucia and Ctesiphon and reaching as far as the Persian Gulf; these gains were short-lived. Vologases III, whose eastern domains were untouched, took advantage of the weakened state of Osroes I to regain lost territory, by 129 defeated him. Another contender named Mithridates V shortly appeared afterwards, but was defeated by Vologases III, in 140. From 134 to 136, Vologases III had to face an invasion by the nomadic Alans, while in the east, he sought to increase the political and military actions as a response to the enlargement of the Kushan Empire.

Under the Roman emperor Antoninus Pius, disturbance once occurred in Armenia due to the Romans appointing a new king in Armenia. Vologases III, did not protest, either due to not being powerful enough, or because he did not want to put the thriving long-distance in jeopardy, from which the Parthian state was gaining hefty income from. In 147, Vologases III was succeeded by Mithridates V's son Vologases IV. Vologases is the Latin form of the Parthian Walagash; the name is attested in New Persian as Balāsh and Middle Persian Wardākhsh. The etymology of the name is unclear. A suggestion has been made that the name could mean "strength". Vologases III was a son of Pacorus II. During the last years of Pacorus' reign, Vologases III co-ruled with him. In 109, an Parthian contender named Osroes. Pacorus died in the same year, was succeeded by Vologases III, who continued his fathers struggle with Osroes I over the Parthian crown. Osroes I managed to seize the western part of the empire, including Mesopotamia, while Vologases III ruled in the east.

In 113, Osroes I violated the Treaty of Rhandeia with the Romans by deposing Vologases III's brother Axidares and appointing the latters brother Parthamasiris as the king of Armenia. This gave the Roman emperor Trajan the pretext to invade the Parthian domain and take advantage of the civil war ongoing between Vologases III and Osroes. In 114, Trajan turned it into a Roman province. In 116, Trajan captured the capital of the Parthians. Trajan reached as far as the Persian Gulf, where he forced the Parthian vassal ruler of Characene, Attambelos VII, to pay tribute. Fearing a revolt by the Parthians, Trajan had Osroes I removed and forced the latters son Parthamaspates on the throne. However, these gains were short-lived. After Trajans death in 117, the Parthians removed Parthamaspates from the throne and reinstated Osroes I. Trajan's successor, Hadrian renounced the remnants of Trajan's conquests in the east, acknowledged the Treaty of Rhandeia, with the Parthian prince Vologases becoming the new king of Armenia.

The weakened state of the western part of the Parthian Empire gave Vologases III—whose eastern domains were untouched—the opportunity to regain lost territory seized by Osroes I. In 129, Vologases III managed to remove Osroes I from power. However, shortly afterwards, a new contender named. Vologases III faced new challenges other places, they reached as far as Caucasian Albania, Media and Cappadocia. In the east, Vologases III sought to increase the political and military actions as a response to the enlargement of the Kushan Empire. In 140, he defeated and deposed Mithridates V. Under Hadrian's successor Antoninus Pius, disturbance once occurred in Armenia due to the Romans appointing a new king in Armenia. Vologases III, did not protest, either due to not being powerful enough, or because he did not want to put the thriving long-distance trade in jeopardy, from which the Parthian state was gaining hefty income from. In 147, Vologases III was succeeded by Mithridates V's son Vologases IV. Under Pacorus II, the usage of the image of the Greek goddess Tyche on the reverse of the Parthian coins became more regular than that of the seated king with a bow on the coin mints from Ecbatana.

This was reversed under Vologases III. A fire temple is depicted on the reverse of his coins. On the observe of his coins is a portrait of him using the same tiara as his father. A rock relief at Behistun portrays an Parthian monarch, most Vologases III. Badian, Ernst. "Hadrian". Encyclopaedia Iranica, Vol. XI, Fasc. 4. P. 458. Chaumont, M. L.. "Armenia and Iran ii. The pre-Islamic period". Encyclopaedia Iranica, Vol. II, Fasc. 4. Pp. 418–438. Chaumont, M. L.. "Balāš". Encyclopaedia Iranica, Vol. III, Fasc. 6. Pp. 574–580. Dąbrowa, Edward. "The Arsacid Empire". In Daryaee, Touraj; the Oxford Handbook of Iranian History. Oxford University Press. Pp. 1–432. ISBN 0-19-987575-8. Archive