click links in text for more info
SUMMARY / RELATED TOPICS

Isaac Anderson (congressman)

Isaac Anderson was a member of the U. S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania, he documented the history of the PA area. Isaac Anderson was born at "Anderson Place," in Charlestown Township, Pennsylvania now Schuylkill Township, Chester County, near Valley Forge, the son of Patrick Anderson and grandson of early settler James Anderson; as a youth he was the carrier of dispatches between the headquarters of the Revolutionary Army under General George Washington at Valley Forge and the Congress in session at York, Pennsylvania. He served three terms of service in the American Revolutionary War before reaching the age of eighteen, at which time he became an ensign in the Fifth Battalion of Chester County Militia, he was commissioned on May 1779, as first lieutenant, Fifth Battalion, Sixth Company. He served as justice of the peace in Charlestown Township for several years, was a member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives in 1801. Anderson was elected as a Republican to the Ninth Congresses.

He was not a candidate for renomination in 1806. He was engaged in agricultural pursuits and sawmilling, he died at "Anderson Place" in 1838. Interment was in the family burying ground across the road from the family home near Valley Forge, he is the great-grandfather of Gov. Samuel W. Pennypacker and grandfather of Medal of Honor recipient Everett W. Anderson. United States Congress. "Isaac Anderson". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved on 2009-05-21 The Political Graveyard

Benjamin David Fleming Beith

Benjamin David Fleming Beith was a British businessman in China and member of the Executive Council and Legislative Council of Hong Kong. B. D. F. Beith was the manager of the Jardine Matheson & Co. and worked in both Hong Kong and Shanghai. He was member of the board of the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation in 1925, he was made Justice of the Peace in January 1928. In the same year, he was appointed to the Legislative Council in May. In April 1929, he was nominated by the Chamber of Commerce to fill the vacancy at the Legislative Council for eight months during the absence of John Owen Hughes, he was again appointed to the Legislative Council in March 1930 in replacement of A. C. Hynes and continued to serve until 1933, he became member of the Executive Council in June 1929 during the absence of Henry Pollock. Among others he was member of the Authorized Architects' Committee

Central Utah Project

The Central Utah Project is a US federal water project, authorized for construction under the Colorado River Storage Project Act of April 11, 1956, as a participating project. In general, the Central Utah Project develops a portion of Utah's share of the yield of the Colorado River, as set out in the Colorado River Compact of 1922; the Central Utah Project was authorized under the Colorado River Storage Project Act on April 11, 1956, as a participating project of the Colorado River Storage Project to help meet Utah's long-term water needs. As planned and authorized, the Central Utah Project consisted of six units or sub-projects: the Bonneville Unit, the Jensen Unit, the Vernal Unit, the Uinta Unit, the Upalco Unit, Ute Indian Unit; the largest and most complex is the Bonneville Unit, which diverts water from the Uinta Basin, a part of the Colorado River Basin, to the Lake Bonneville Basin. The other units were designed to provide for development of local water supplies in the Uinta Basin; the Central Utah Project develops water for irrigation and industrial use.

The project provides recreation and wildlife, flood control, water conservation, water quality benefits. Construction progress on the Central Utah Project proceeded because of: the complexity of the project; the slow progress prompted state and local officials to ask Congress to empower the Central Utah Water Conservancy District to complete the planning and construction of the remaining portion of the CUP the Bonneville Unit. The Central Utah Project Completion Act enacted on October 30, 1992, removed responsibility for completing the Central Utah Project, a federal water project, from the United States Bureau of Reclamation. For the first time in history, Congress designated a local entity as the planning and construction entity for a major Federal water project. Construction progress on the Bonneville Unit has been slow because of the complexity of the project, the need for environmental analyses since of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, inadequate federal funding. By the early 1990s, the slow progress prompted state and local officials to ask Congress to empower the Central Utah Water Conservancy District to complete the planning and the construction of the remaining portions of the Central Utah Project, including the Bonneville Unit.

The Central Utah Water Conservancy District is a water conservancy district organized under the laws of the State of Utah, representing local water users in a ten-county district. Congress responded to local concerns by enacting the Central Utah Project Completion Act on October 30, 1992. In the Central Utah Project Completion Act, Congress provided the direction for completing the Central Utah Project under a partnership among the Central Utah Water Conservancy District, the United States Department of the Interior, the Utah Reclamation Mitigation and Conservation Commission, a federal commission created by the Central Utah Project Completion Act; the Central Utah Project Completion Act removed administrative responsibility for the Central Utah Project completion from the United States Bureau of Reclamation, placing it under the Office of the Secretary of the Interior. As a result, the Central Utah Project Completion Act Office, a branch of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Water and Science located in Provo, administers the Central Utah Project Completion Act and the completion of the Central Utah Project.

That is: Construction of the remainder of the Central Utah Project became the responsibility of the local water district—the Central Utah Water Conservancy District The Central Utah Project Completion Act established the Utah Reclamation Mitigation and Conservation Commission to oversee facilities to mitigate for the environmental effects of the Central Utah Project. Water for the Future – The Central Utah Project Completion Act authorizes sufficient Federal funds to complete the Central Utah Project; the construction of CUP facilities provides water for Utah's future—including the future of the Uinta Basin. The Uinta Basin Replacement Project is a key element of the construction authorized under Central Utah Project Completion Act. Recreation Opportunities – Central Utah Project facilities provide a range of recreational opportunities. Fiscal Responsibility – The Central Utah Project Completion Act created a cost-sharing environment under which local funds augment federal funding in the planning and construction of Central Utah Project features—which engenders additional fiscal responsibility.

Environmental Commitments – The Central Utah Project Completion Act created the Utah Reclamation Mitigation and Conservation Commission to coordinate and plan mitigation measures to meet environmental mitigation and conservation measures. The Central Utah Project Completion Act includes provisions for maintaining steam flows at prescribed minimum rates for the benefit of aquatic and riparian habitat. Water Conservation – The Central Utah Project Completion Act authorizes substantial funding for the planning and implementation of water conservation measures and projects. Local Development – The Central Utah Project Completion Act provides funding for local water development projects in areas that do not benefit directly from the Central Utah Project. Ute Indian Rights Settlement – CUPCA encourages the Northern Ute Tribe to quantify by compact its fede

Rudolph J. Daley

Rudolph J. Daley was a Vermont attorney and judge, he is most notable for serving as an Associate Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court from 1972 to 1980. Daley was born John Rudolph Edward Daley in Newport, Vermont on September 10, 1918, the son of Patrick T. Daley and Fedora Daley, he attended Sacred Heart parochial school in Newport, graduated from Newport High School. Daley attended Saint Michael's College for a year, began the study of law in the office of attorney Raymond L. Miles of Newport. Daley was admitted to the bar in 1946, practiced in Newport. Daley was a longtime member of the Vermont Army National Guard, he served on active duty with the 43rd Infantry Division in the Pacific Theater from 1943 to 1945, was serving at the Tulare, California prisoner of war camp at the time of his 1945 wedding. He transferred to the judge advocate general corps after becoming an attorney, he returned to active duty again when the division was called to federal service during the Korean War, serving this time in West Germany.

Daley was promoted to lieutenant colonel in 1960, attained the rank of colonel in the mid-1960s, retired from the military in the late 1960s. A Republican, Daley served as State's Attorney of Orleans County from 1947 to 1950, 1953 to 1957, he was Newport's City Attorney from 1949 to 1950, again from 1957 to 1959. In 1956, Daley was elected to represent Newport in the Vermont House of Representatives, he was reelected in 1958. In 1959, Daley was appointed a judge of the Vermont Superior Court. By 1966, Daley had advanced by seniority to become chief judge of the superior court. By tradition, the chief judge of the superior court was next in line for appointment to the Vermont Supreme Court. In 1972, Daley was appointed as an Associate Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court, filling the vacancy created when Associate Percival L. Shangraw was promoted to Chief Justice. Daley remained on the court until retiring in 1980, was succeeded by Wynn Underwood. In retirement, Daley was a resident of Newport, he died in Newport on September 26, 1990.

Daley was buried at St. Mary's Cemetery in Newport. In 1945, Daley married Blanche Daigle, they were the parents of Daniel, Anne Marie, Timothy. "Get Jap Flag". Burlington Free Press. Burlington, VT. June 16, 1943 – via Newspapers.com. CS1 maint: extra punctuation "Licensed to Wed: Daley-Daigle". Fresno Bee. Fresno, CA. February 14, 1945 – via Newspapers.com. CS1 maint: extra punctuation "Three Young Men Pass Examinations to State Bar: Six Others Complete Tests, But They Must Finish Studies". Burlington Free Press. Burlington, VT. Morning Press Bureau. October 4, 1946 – via Newspapers.com. CS1 maint: extra punctuation "William Hill and Rudolph Daley Are Elected State Superior Judges". Burlington Free Press. Burlington, VT. Morning Press Bureau. February 20, 1959 – via Newspapers.com. CS1 maint: extra punctuation "Col. Sibley Reassigned". Bennington Banner. Bennington, VT. April 18, 1960 – via Newspapers.com. CS1 maint: extra punctuation "Divoll Resigns Superior Bench. Burlington Free Press. Burlington, VT. April 22, 1966 – via Newspapers.com.

CS1 maint: extra punctuation "Gov. Hoff Reviews Troops". Burlington Free Press. Burlington, VT. August 4, 1967 – via Newspapers.com. CS1 maint: extra punctuation Chapman, Geoffrey. "Daley Elected to Vt. Supreme Court". Bennington Banner. Bennington, VT – via Newspapers.com. CS1 maint: extra punctuation Smith, Jane. "Underwood gets High Court Post". Burlington Free Press. Burlington, VT – via Newspapers.com. CS1 maint: extra punctuation "Obituary, Blanche C. Daley". Burlington Free Press. Burlington, VT. March 27, 1986 – via Newspapers.com. CS1 maint: extra punctuation Donoghue, Mike. "Retired State High Court Justice Dies". Burlington Free Press. Burlington, VT – via Newspapers.com. CS1 maint: extra punctuation "Obituary, Rudolph J. Daley". Burlington Free Press. Burlington, VT. September 27, 1990 – via Newspapers.com. CS1 maint: extra punctuation Thomas, Richard C.. State of Vermont Legislative Directory. Montpelier, VT: Vermont Secretary of State. U. S. Army General. U. S. Army Register. Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office – via Ancestry.com.

Spear, Rufus W.. "Vermont Birth Records, 1909-2008, Entry for John Rudolph Edward Daley". Ancestry.com. Provo, UT: Ancestry.com, LLC. Retrieved February 13, 2018. CS1 maint: extra punctuation "Justices of the Supreme Court: 1778 – Present". Office of the Vermont Secretary of State. Retrieved January 8, 2018

Colby railway station

Colby railway station is a small railway station on the southern edge of the village of Colby in the south of the Isle of Man served by the Isle of Man Railway. The railway station was established in 1874 it consisted of a goods siding, with a ground level platform, waiting room and station master's office on the north side of the running line; the building was of the same design as the one at Ballasalla railway station, demolished in 1985, the one still extant at Santon railway station. A passing loop was added in 1907 breaking the 5 mile 5 furlong single line section between Castletown and Port Erin into two equal sections. Trains approach the railway station from the north on a right curve and depart in a southerly direction in a straight section that lasts until the level road crossing via Kentraugh Farm occupational crossing; the railway station is located on the outskirts of the village, the houses that back onto the perimeter of the railway station on one side are that of the local authority.

The village has its own public house, the Colby Glen, visible in the trees to the north of the railway station, the housing can be seen from the passing trains. In 2011 the local football club established new headquarters in the field to the seaward side of the railway station, for which a new automated level crossing was installed at the northern extent of the railway station; this was the first new level crossing on the railway for over a century. The railway station is a mandatory stopping place and one of the busiest on the line for local traffic, popular with locals who travel by train to do their shopping in either Douglas or Port Erin; the building here survived through nationalisation and was demolished in 1980, leaving no shelter for waiting passengers. The former goods platform is still distinguishable on the westerly side of the railway station, the siding itself being long-since lifted; until 1991 the pointwork was still in place at the northerly end of the railway station but this was removed when remedial works were carried out at this time.

In 1991 the shelter from Braddan Bridge on the long-abandoned line to Peel was refurbished and moved here, but since the railway station received platforms on both up and down sides of the loop in conjunction with an all-island sewerage network in 2002, the waiting shelter is no longer at platform height, being left in-situ at a lower point giving it an unusual appearance in respect of the actual platforms. The railway station is unique in being the only one on the line to not carry bi-lingual railway station nameboards because the name translated carries the same spelling, but this does lead to an inconsistency of naming along the line. Isle of Man Railway stations Colby, Isle of Man James I. C. Boyd Isle of Man Railway, Volume 3, The Routes & Rolling Stock ISBN 0-85361-479-2 Norman Jones Scenes from the Past: Isle of Man Railway ISBN 1-870119-22-3 Robert Hendry Rails in the Isle of Man: A Colour Celebration ISBN 1-85780-009-5 A. M Goodwyn Manx Transport Kaleidoscope, 2nd Edition Colby Station Isle Of Man Guide Online Reference Guide