Federal Home Loan Bank Board Building

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Federal Home Loan Bank Board Building
Federal Home Loan Bank Board Building 1.jpg
Federal Home Loan Bank Board Building is located in Washington, D.C.
Federal Home Loan Bank Board Building
Location 320 1st Street, NW
Washington, D.C.
Coordinates 38°53′35″N 77°1′9″W / 38.89306°N 77.01917°W / 38.89306; -77.01917Coordinates: 38°53′35″N 77°1′9″W / 38.89306°N 77.01917°W / 38.89306; -77.01917
Built 1927–1928
Architect George E. Mathews
Louis A. Simon
Architectural style Classical Revival
NRHP reference # 07000642[1]
Added to NRHP July 3, 2007

The Federal Home Loan Bank Board Building is an historic structure located in Downtown Washington, D.C. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2007.

History[edit]

The structure was built to house the Acacia Mutual Insurance Company, which was the only federally chartered life insurance company.[2] It was incorporated in 1869 as the Masonic Mutual Relief Association of the District of Columbia. The Federal government took procession of the building in 1934 to house the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, which is how the building acquired its name in 1937. It was a New Deal program that supported home ownership.

Architecture[edit]

George E. Mathews of the architectural firm of Hoggson Brothers was the original architect for the building. Louis A. Simon of the Public Works Branch in the Department of the Treasury was the architect for an addition that was built from 1935 to 1937. The building exemplifies early-20th-century Classical Revival intuitional office architecture.[2] The exterior features facades covered with limestone with classical detail. The interior features an ornamented lobby.

References[edit]

  1. ^ National Park Service (2009-03-13). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
  2. ^ a b "District of Columbia Inventory of Historic Sites" (PDF). DC Preservation. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-03-18. Retrieved 2011-12-05. 

External links[edit]