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People's Progress Party

The People's Progress Party is a political party in Papua New Guinea. It was founded on 11 November 1969 by Julius Chan and Warren Dutton, forming a caucus of eleven members of the House of Assembly of Papua and New Guinea. Following independence in 1975, Chan served, while party leader, as Prime Minister from 1980 to 1982 and 1994 to 1997. Chan’s second Government was brought down by the Sandline Affair and the party suffered in the elections that year. Chan and acting Prime Minister John Giheno lost their seats, Michael Nali became the party’s leader in Parliament; when Chan was not serving as Prime Minister, the party was a junior partner in a coalition with the Pangu Party. At the 2002 General Elections, the party won 8 seats. At the 2007 General Election the party lost half of its seats. However, the party’s original leader, Julius Chan, returned to Parliament, took over the party’s leadership. Chan ran as the opposition candidate for Prime Minister, but received the support of only 21 of the 109 members of Parliament.

The party had 5 members in the 111-seat National Parliament of Papua New Guinea as of September 2019 and was part of the governing coalition of Prime Minister Peter O'Neill. Sir Julius Chan - Member for New Ireland Provincial Theodore Zurenuoc - Member for Finschhafen Open Ben Micah - Party leader and Member for Kavieng Open Michael Nali: Led the party while Chan was out of Parliament, he held various ministerial positions, including Deputy Prime Minister. He switched from his Mendi Open seat to contest the Southern Highlands Provincial electorate in the 2007 Elections but did not win. Dr Allan Marat: 2003–2004 - Minister of Trade. Left the party and joined the Melanesian Liberal Party. Andrew Baing: 2004–2006 - Minister of Fisheries. Dismissed from Parliament for wrong conduct. Facebook Page

This Is It (Ryan Adams song)

"This Is It" is a song by singer-songwriter Ryan Adams from his 2003 album Rock n Roll. The song was co-written with Johnny T. Yerington and released as a single in 2004. A music video for "This Is It", directed by Dominic J. DeJoseph, was produced in 2004, it features his band performing the song. An acoustic version of the song was released as a b-side. A number of non-album tracks were released as b-sides on the various "This Is It" singles, including "Red Lights", "Closer When She Goes", "Twice As Bad As Love", "Funeral Marching", "Liar". All of these songs are outtakes from Rock n Roll, with the exception of "Twice As Bad As Love", which comes from the sessions for Love Is Hell. CD Single Lost Highway Records 986214 "This Is It" "Red Lights" "Closer When She Goes" "Twice As Bad As Love" Limited Edition 10" Vinyl Single Mercury Records 9862150 "This Is It" "Funeral Marching" "Liar" "This Is It" Note that evidence of the existence of this 10" EP remains to be seen, as only acetates are known to exist, not stock copies.

Ryan Adams — guitar and all instruments Johnny T. Yerington — drums John Flaugher — bass guitar Produced by James Barber"Red Lights" / "Closer When She Goes" Produced by Eli Janney"Twice As Bad As Love" Produced by John Porter with the band in New Orleans "This Is It" music video on YouTube/VEVO Lyrics of this song at MetroLyrics

Kay Floyd

P. Kay Floyd is an American politician who represents the 46th district in the Oklahoma Senate. A Democrat, her district includes parts of Oklahoma City, she was first elected to the Oklahoma House of Representatives in the 2012 state election and took office on November 14, 2012. Floyd is the first lesbian representative elected to the Oklahoma legislature, the second LGBT person following Sen. Al McAffrey, who she succeeded in both the House and the Senate. Floyd has received her education from the following institutions: Law Degree, The University of Oklahoma BS, Oklahoma State University Floyd has had the following professional experience: Judge, Special Municipal Court, 1991–Present Judge, State Administrative Law Judge, 1991–Present Adjunct Professor, Oklahoma State University Attorney, Senior Citizen Division of Legal Aid Campaign website Appearances on C-SPAN

High Ercall Hall

High Ercall Hall or Ercall Hall is the remaining part of a larger complex in the village of High Ercall, Shropshire, 8 miles north-east of Shrewsbury. The present structure is a Grade II* L-shaped, three-storey building of 16th-century origin, constructed of sandstone and brick, it has 5 bays with 3 alternate projecting gables. Adjacent to the house is a row of arches, the only remainder of a larger 17th-century house building, badly damaged during the English Civil War. Hamo Peveril bought High Ercall in 1098 and it remained in the Peveril family until 1271, it passed to the Ercall family, who held it until 1391. The earliest recorded building on the site was a 12th-century Manor House built by the Ercall family; this was protected by John de Ercall in the 13th century by the construction of curtain walling and defensive towers. The manor passed to Thomas Newport in 1391 and the present house was constructed by the Newport family in the 16th century, it passed to Francis Newport who, between 1620, had a larger mansion house built alongside.

At the time of the Civil War, his son Richard Newport, 1st Baron Newport, an ardent Royalist, fortified the buildings to act as a Royalist stronghold and garrison. Large earthen ramparts were thrown up against the curtain walling to protect the buildings from artillery fire; the hall was besieged several times during the war and fell to the Parliamentary forces in 1646. The new mansion was by badly damaged and any fortifications were subsequently demolished by the Parliamentary forces; the original buildings, were still habitable and continued in use as a farmhouse. In 1906 it was occupied by James H James-Moore, it is still in private hands. The history and archaeology of the hall was covered by the 2002 Time Team episode Siege House in Shropshire. Listed buildings in Ercall Magna "Heritage Gateway-Ercall Hall". Heritage Gateway. Retrieved 7 November 2012

Hui Jiakang

Hui Jiakang is a Chinese football player who plays for Tianjin Teda F. C. as a attacking midfielder or left winger. Hui Jiakang started his football career after graduating from the Shenzhen youth team in 2008, he established himself within the Senior Shenzhen Xiangxue team after he made his debut against Shandong Luneng in a 2-1 defeat on July 5, in the 2008 Chinese Super League season. At the end of the season Hui Jiakang played thirteen league games and his club wanted to offer him a new long term contract, however he was dropped from the team after there was a dispute about pay with his new contract at the beginning of the 2009 football league season. Shenzhen held him to his remaining contract while the Chinese Football Association stipulated that Hui Jiakang is still contractually obliged to Shenzhen and cannot transfer unless it is to a foreign team. Without any football for a whole season he went off to train with Hungarian side Ferencvárosi TC until Chinese second tier side Chengdu Blades took him at the beginning of the 2010 league season where he made his debut against Nanjing Yoyo on April 4, 2010 in a 3-0 victory.

Throughout the season he would play in fourteen league games as he aided the club to a runners-up spot within the division and promotion back into the top tier. The following season would see Hui back into the top tier where despite being a regular within the team he could not prevent the team finishing within the relegation zone at the end of the 2011 Chinese Super League season. Hui Jiankang graduated through the Chinese U-20 team that took part in the AFC Youth Championship in 2008, where he played in 3 matches and scored 1 goal. Hui Jiakang would graduate to senior side and made his debut in a 2008 friendly against Iran in a 2–0 loss coming on as a substitute, he made his second appearance for China nine years on 10 January 2017 in the 2017 China Cup against Iceland. Statistics accurate as of match played 11 November 2018 2008 Shenzhen squad at footballsquads.co.uk Player stats at sohu.com Hui Jiakang at National-Football-Teams.com Hui Jiakang at Soccerway