click links in text for more info
SUMMARY / RELATED TOPICS

Foreign relations of São Tomé and Príncipe

Until independence in 1975, São Tomé and Príncipe had few ties abroad except those that passed through Portugal. Following independence, the new government sought to expand its diplomatic relationships. A common language and colonial experience have led to close collaboration between São Tomé and other ex-Portuguese colonies in Africa Angola. São Toméan relations with other African countries in the region, such as Gabon and the Republic of the Congo, are good. In December 2000, São Tomé signed the African Union treaty; the São Toméan government has maintained a foreign policy based on nonalignment and cooperation with any country willing to assist in its economic development. In recent years, it has increasingly emphasized ties to the United States and western Europe. List of diplomatic missions in São Tomé and Príncipe List of diplomatic missions of São Tomé and Príncipe

List of titles and honours of the Portuguese Crown

This List of titles and honours of the Portuguese Crown sets out the many titles of the monarchs of the Kingdom of Portugal while the monarchy was still in place. Note: Titles marked with * are titles that were not still used or still held at the time of the deposition of the monarchy in Portugal in 1910. Titles marked with " are titles that were held by the Portuguese monarch: Emperor of Brazil" King of the United Kingdom of Portugal and the Algarves* King of Portugal King of the Algarves King of Silves* Prince of the Portuguese* Duke of Portugal* Count of Portugal* Lord of Ceuta* Lord of Alcácer in Africa* Lord of Guinea Note: Titles marked with * are titles that were not still used or still held at the time of the deposition of the monarchy in Portugal in 1910. Prince of Portugal* Prince of Brazil* Prince Royal of the United Kingdom of Portugal and the Algarves* Prince Royal of Portugal and the Algarves Duke of Braganza Duke of Guimarães Marquis of Vila Viçosa Count of Guimarães Count of Arraiolos Count of Ourém Count of Neiva Count of Faria Grand Master of the Order of the Immaculate Conception of Vila Viçosa Grand Master of the Order of Saint Michael of the Wing Grand Mistress of the Order of Saint Isabel Prince of Beira Duke of Barcelos Count of Barcelos Style of the Portuguese sovereign Kingdom of Portugal Portuguese empire Portuguese nobility Titles held by the heir to the throne of Portugal Titles held by the heir to the heir of the throne of Portugal

Worting Junction

Worting Junction is a railway junction on the former LSWR route south of Basingstoke where the line divides to go towards Salisbury or Southampton. When the line was first opened in 1854, Worting Junction was constructed as a flat junction; this required that down trains heading up trains from Southampton cross each other's paths. This was not a great problem, however as traffic and speeds increased the junction became a bottleneck. To relieve this, a flying junction was provided to the south, opening on 30 May 1897; this changed the arrangement so that up trains from Southampton line now crossed over the up and down Salisbury lines on Battledown Flyover, ​3 1⁄4 miles west of Basingstoke. North of Worting Junction, stopping services to/from London Waterloo and CrossCountry services to/from the North of England via Reading use the outer pair of tracks, while express services to/from London Waterloo use the inner pair of tracks; the inner pair of tracks are unelectrified through the junction and continue towards the west to Salisbury and Exeter

Simone Rapisarda Casanova

Simone Rapisarda Casanova is an Italian experimental filmmaker living in Canada. In 2014 he won the Leopard for Best Emerging Director at the Locarno International Film Festival. Rapisarda Casanova was born in Italy, he developed an interest in photography and cinema while studying Computer Science at the University of Pisa. Soon after moving to Canada in 2000, he abandoned his career in the software industry to devote himself to studying film, first in Montreal and in Toronto, he is both a teacher. He is an assistant professor at Simon Fraser University's School for the Contemporary Arts, British Columbia, Canada. Blending documentary and fiction, Rapisarda Casanova’s experimental films are the result of a process-driven approach in which the filmmaker, eschewing screenwriting and production-planning tackles all aspects of preproduction and postproduction, his style is marked by an oneiric approach to storytelling, long takes, fixed camera positions, the choice of non-actors who improvise on a loose outline.

The filmmaker only shoots one take for each scene and, at a stage and assembles only what seems to evoke the most intimate essence of characters and places. Metacinematic narratives, diegetic soundscapes, low-angle shots and the extensive use of wide-angle and ultra wide-angle lenses are other trademarks of his style; those stylistical choices are driven by multiple intents: to explore the boundaries of the medium, to make the spectator aware of cinematic artificiality, to question the ethics of Western ethnographic filmmmaking. The first feature-length film by the author is an experimental ethnography that captures the last days of the village of Juan Antonio, shortly before hurricane Ike wiped it out; the film was included in Film Comment’s list of the “Fifty Best Undistributed Films of 2012.” An aging but tenacious Tuscan shepherd, Pacifico Pieruccioni, is forced by the economic crisis to give up the house and land where his parents had fought in the Resistance against the German Army during World War II.

Oddly enough, the prospective buyer is a young German. The shepherd and the prospective buyer start a conversation about present-day Italy; the film has won the Best Emerging Director award at the Locarno International Film Festival in 2014. The film captures the daily life of a boy named Widley in contemporary Haiti, as it unfolds between mundane activities, mystic presences, the turmoil caused by upcoming elections, his interest for the making of a weird film. With this film Rapisarda's research moves further into experimental ethnofiction following the shared ethnography path opened by Jean Rouch. Ibidem Films Simone Rapisarda Casanova on IMDb

Traditional South African Regiments

South Africa has a number of Traditional Regiments. These are South African Army Reserve Force regiments who have long histories of serving the Government of the day; the traditional regiments are those who were formed before the establishment of South Africa as a unified country, although there are a few which are much more recent. The traditional regiments have a number of elements which are different from the other units, such as certain peculiarities of dress; the most noticeable of these is Sword by officers. The Traditional Cape Regiments are the five traditional South African Army Reserve Force regiments of Cape Town, South Africa which are, in order of precedence: Cape Field Artillery Cape Garrison Artillery Cape Town Rifles Cape Town Highlanders Regiment Westelike Provinsie Brief profiles, in chronological order - see individual articles on the regiments. Formed as a volunteer corps in 1855. Served in the 9th Frontier War, the Transkei, the Basutoland Gun War. Served in the Bechuanaland Campaign.

Served in the Anglo-Boer War. Awarded a King's Colour in 1904. Embodied in the Citizen Force of the Union Defence Forces in 1913. In World War I, served in the German South West Africa Campaign; the Earl of Athlone was colonel-in-chief 1930-57. In World War II, served in the East Africa Campaign, the North Africa Campaign, the Italy Campaign. Granted the Freedom of the City of Cape Town in 1967. Served in the Border War, the State of Emergency. Formed as a volunteer corps in 1857. Served in the 9th Frontier War, the Northern Border Campaign, the Transkei Campaign. Served in the Bechuanaland Campaign. Served in the Anglo-Boer War. Awarded a King's Colour in 1905. Embodied in the Citizen Force of the Union Defence Forces in 1913. In World War I, served in the 1914 Rebellion and the German South West Africa Campaign. In World War II, served in the East Africa Campaign, the North Africa Campaign, the Italy Campaign. Granted the Freedom of the City of Cape Town in 1967. Served in the Angola Campaign, the Border War, the State of Emergency.

Formed as a volunteer corps in 1885. Served in the Bechuanaland Campaign. Served in the Anglo-Boer War. Awarded a King's Colour in 1904; the Duke of Connaught was colonel-in-chief 1908-42. Embodied in the Citizen Force of the Union Defence Forces in 1913. In World War I, served in the German South West Africa Campaign. In World War II, served in the North Africa Campaign and the Italy Campaign. Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother was colonel-in-chief 1948-61. Granted the Freedom of the City of Cape Town in 1967. Served in the Angola Campaign, the Border War, the State of Emergency. Formed as a Citizen Force unit in Stellenbosch in 1934, regards itself as successor to various volunteer units which existed in that district in the 19th century. In World War II, volunteers from RWP served with the South African Tank Corps in the North Africa Campaign. Moved to Paarl in 1948, converted to armour in 1949. Reverted to infantry in 1960. Divided into two battalions in 1970, the 1st battalion moved to Cape Town in 1974.

Served in the Angola Campaign, the Border War, the State of Emergency. Awarded the Freedom of the City of Cape Town. Three Citizen Force anti-aircraft batteries, formed in the South African Air Force when home defences were reorganised in 1942. Transferred to the South African Artillery in 1949, to the South African Corps of Marines in 1951. Reverted to the SA Artillery in 1955 and amalgamated into a single unit, 4 Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment. Affiliated with the University of Cape Town in 1960, renamed'UCT Regiment'. Adopted the name of an earlier coast artillery regiment, the Cape Garrison Artillery, in 1974. Served in the Angola Campaign, the Border War, the State of Emergency. Granted the Freedom of the City of Cape Town. There are a number of Traditional Units in Kwa-Zulu Natal; these include: The Natal Carbineers Durban Light Infantry Natal Mounted Rifles Umvoti Mounted Rifles Durban Regiment Natal Field Artillery 1 Medical Battalion Group Witwatersrand Rifles Transvaal Scottish Regiment South African Irish Regiment Light Horse Regiment Castle of Good Hope

Udagawa Yōan

Udagawa Yōan was a 19th-century Japanese scholar of Western studies, or "Rangaku". In 1837, he published the first volume of his Introduction to Chemistry, a compilation of scientific books in Dutch, which describes a wide range of scientific knowledge from the West. Most of the Dutch original material appears to be derived from William Henry's 1799 Elements of Experimental Chemistry. In particular, the book contains a detailed description of the electric battery invented by Volta forty years earlier in 1800; the battery itself was constructed by Udagawa in 1831 and used in experiments, including medical ones, based on a belief that electricity could help cure illnesses. Udagawa's Science of Chemistry reports for the first time in details the findings and theories of Lavoisier in Japan. Accordingly, Udagawa made numerous scientific experiments and created new scientific terms, which are still in current use in modern scientific Japanese: e.g. “oxygen”, “hydrogen”, “nitrogen”, “carbon”, “oxidation”, “reduction”, “saturation”, “dissolution” and “element”.

舎密開宗 PDF files of Seimi Kaisō provided by the library of Nakamura Gakuen University