Four Leaf Towers

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Four Leaf Towers
FourLeafTowersHoustonTX.JPG
General information
Status Complete
Type Residential
Location 5100 San Felipe, Houston, Texas
Coordinates 29°45′04″N 95°27′50″W / 29.751°N 95.464°W / 29.751; -95.464Coordinates: 29°45′04″N 95°27′50″W / 29.751°N 95.464°W / 29.751; -95.464
Opening 1982
Technical details
Floor count 40
Design and construction
Architect Cesar Pelli

Four Leaf Towers is a high-rise residential complex located in Houston, Texas, United States, on San Felipe Street adjacent to the Uptown Houston district.[1][2] They were designed by architect Cesar Pelli.

Description and history[edit]

Designed by architect Cesar Pelli and constructed in 1982, the two towers in the complex each contain 200 condominium units.[3] The 40-story condominium towers are situated in park-like setting. The outdoor sculpture, "Polygenesis" by Beverly Pepper is located at the front of the complex.[4]

At 4:15 AM on October 13, 2001,[5] a fire occurred in a fifth floor unit in the west tower.[6] Houston Fire Department firefighter Captain Jay Jahnke died while fighting the fire. Over 175 firefighters extinguished the fire.[5]

Zoned schools[edit]

The Four Leaf Towers are within the Houston Independent School District.

Residents are zoned to Briargrove Elementary School,[7] Tanglewood Middle School (formerly Grady Middle School),[8] and Wisdom High School (formerly Lee High School) with Lamar and Westside high schools as options.[9][10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Four-Leaf Towers :: 5100 San Felipe, Houston, Texas, United States :: Glass Steel and Stone". Retrieved 2008-04-05. 
  2. ^ "Uptown District Map." Uptown Houston District. Retrieved on January 30, 2009.
  3. ^ "Four Leaf Towers, Houston". Retrieved 2008-04-05. 
  4. ^ "Interfin, Four Leaf Towers". Archived from the original on 2008-01-12. Retrieved 2008-04-05. 
  5. ^ a b Dyer, Nicole. "Towering inferno: from a 40-story apartment building in Houston to the World Trade Center in New York City, firefighters wield high-tech tools to battle monster flames." Science World. January 21, 2002. 1. Retrieved on May 22, 2010.
  6. ^ Suval, John. "Riding Short." Houston Press. Thursday January 10, 2002. 1. Retrieved on May 22, 2010.
  7. ^ "Briargrove Elementary Attendance Zone Archived March 20, 2009, at the Wayback Machine.." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on August 26, 2009.
  8. ^ "Grady Middle Attendance Zone Archived March 20, 2009, at the Wayback Machine.." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on August 26, 2009.
  9. ^ Home Page. Lee High School. May 9, 2005. Retrieved on May 25, 2009.
  10. ^ "Lamar High School Attendance Zone Archived September 28, 2011, at the Wayback Machine.." Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on August 26, 2009.

External links[edit]