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Walter Madeley

Walter Bayley Madeley was a leader of the South African Labour Party and a cabinet minister. Madeley got his schooling in India at Bombay Cathedral High School. In 1889, he became an apprentice at the Woolwich Arsenal. In 1896 he immigrated to South Africa, he took part in various strikes. Soon he was considered a leading figure in the Labour Party because of his exceptional ability. In the 1910 general election, he was first elected to the House of Assembly of South Africa as a Labour MP, he represented the districts of Springs Benoni General J. B. M. Hertzog's National Party formed a coalition government with Labour following the 1924 election in order to oust Jan Smuts's South African Party government. In November 1925, Madeley joined the cabinet as minister of post and telegraph services and public works; as minister, he advocated socialist policies such as nationalization of the means of production, to the embarrassment of his National Party colleagues. In 1928 he received, against the express wishes of General Hertzog, a delegation of the Industrial and Commercial Workers' Union, an unrecognized union which had black members and grieved the working conditions of black employees in his department.

Hertzog asked him to resign, but when he refused, Hertzog dropped him from the cabinet. This created a rift within the Labour Party whose leader, Frederic Creswell, supported Hertzog and remained in the government while Madeley's faction went in opposition and became known as "National Council Labour"; the split continued until the 1933 election when Creswell's faction dissolved into Hertozg's National Party leaving Madeley to become undisputed leader of the Labour Party. With the outbreak of World War II in 1939, the Labour Party voted against the Prime Minister Hertzog's motion of neutrality and supported General Smuts, whose party had entered into coalition with Hertzog in 1934 to form the United Party with Smuts as deputy prime minister. Hertzog was forced to resign and Smuts became prime minister for the duration of the war. Labour entered the wartime coalition government and Madeley served as Minister of Labour until the party left the coalition at the end of the war in 1945, he served as minister of social affairs from 1939 to 1943.

Madeley died the next year. DJ Potgieter, Standard Encyclopaedia of Southern Africa, Cape Town: Nasionale Opvoedkundige Uitgewery 1972. BM Schoeman, Parlementêre verkiesings in Suid-Afrika 1910-1976, Pretoria: Aktuele Publikasies 1977 Peter Alexander, War & the Origins of Apartheid: Labour and Politics in South Africa, 1939-1948, James Currey Publishers, 2000

Alexander Bulatovich

Alexander Ksaverievich Bulatovich tonsured Father Antony was a Russian military officer, explorer of Africa, writer and the leader of the imiaslavie movement in Eastern Orthodox Christianity. Alexander was born to a family of Oryol nobility, he studied in Tsarskoye Selo Lyceum served in the Hussar Leib Guard regiment. In 1896 he was a member of the Russian mission of the Red Cross in Ethiopia, where he became a confidant of Negus Menelek II of Ethiopia, he begins arrival to Ethiopia with phenomenal showy courier's marathon by reason of record speed with the use of camel, during this courier's march the Nikolay Leontiev meets him to give help. In 1896 - 1899 he became a military aide of Menelek II in his war with Italy and the southern tribes. Bulatovich joined the expedition of Ras Wolde Giyorgis and became the first European to provide a scientific description of the Kaffa province, he was the first European to reach the mouth of the Omo River. Among the places named by Bulatovich is the Nicholas II Mountain range.

He had to ask permission from the Emperor. After Bulatovich returned to Russia he received a Silver Medal from the Russian Geographical Society for his work in Ethiopia and the military rank of a poruchik of the Leib Guard Hussars, he served in Saint Petersburg. In 1903 after his talks with Saint John of Kronstadt he resigned from the Army and became a monk of the Russian Skete of Saint Andrew near the much larger St. Panteleimon Monastery on Mount Athos in Greece, he visited Ethiopia again trying to establish a Russian Orthodox Monastery there. He became known as Hieromonk Antony Bulatovich. In 1907 after reading the book On Caucasus Mountains by the schema-monk Ilarion, he became one of the leaders of the imiaslavie movement within the Russian Orthodox Church; when the movement was proclaimed a heresy and disbanded by a Russian military force in 1913, he was in St. Petersburg pleading the cause of monks, he continued his fight for the recognition of imiaslavie, published many theological books proving its dogmas, obtained an audience with the Tsar and managed to secure some sort of rehabilitation for himself and his imiaslavtsy comrades.

They were allowed to return to their positions in the Church without repentance. In 1896 - 1899 he became a military aide of Menelek II in his war with Italy and the southern tribes. Bulatovich joined the expedition of Ras Wolde Giyorgis and became the first European to provide a scientific description of the Kaffa province, he was the first European to reach the mouth of the Omo River. Among the places named by Bulatovich is the Nicholas II Mountain range, he had to ask permission from the Emperor. After Bulatovich returned to Russia he received a Silver Medal from the Russian Geographical Society for his work in Ethiopia and the military rank of a poruchik of the Leib Guard Hussars, he served in Saint Petersburg. In 1903 after his talks with Saint John of Kronstadt he resigned from the Army and became a monk of the Russian Skete of Saint Andrew near the much larger St. Panteleimon Monastery on Mount Athos in Greece. On August 28, 1914 Antony Bulatovich received permission to join the Russian Army as an Army priest.

During World War I Father Antony not only served as a priest but on "many occasions led soldiers to attack" and was awarded the Cross of St. George After returning from the war he took part in the discussion about the imiaslavie. In October 1918 the Holy Synod of the Russian Orthodox Church canceled the decision allowing imyaslavtsy to participate in church services provided they repent; the decision was signed by Patriarch Tikhon of Moscow. In January 1919 Anthony Bulatovich stopped any relations with the Holy Synod and Tikhon and returned to his family estate in Lebedinka, where he started a small skete and lived the life of a hermit, he was the spiritual opponent of any civil war. On the night from 5 to 6 December 1919 he was murdered. There are conflicting accounts if the killers were deserters of White Army or Red Army or some unaffiliated robbers. Antony Bulatovich was most the original for the grotesque Schema-Hussar Alexei Bulanovich from the novel The Twelve Chairs by Ilf and Petrov.

He is the hero of Valentin Pikul's story The Hussar on a Camel. In addition he is the hero of the novel The Name of Hero by Richard Seltzer. A. K. Bulatovich, Ethiopia Through Russian Eyes: Country in Transition, 1896-1898, translated by Richard Seltzer, 2000, ISBN 1-56902-117-1. A. K. Bulatovich,With the Armies of Menelik II' translated by Richard Seltzer A. K. Bulatovich, From Entotto to the River Baro translated by Richard Seltzer Russian people in EthiopiaLeonid Artamonov Nikolay Leontiev Nikolay Gumilyov Article in the Bibliographical Dictionary of Victims of Political Repressions Article on the site of Russian orthodox Church Article on Krotov's library Article on site geographia.ru Tatiana Sénina, Un palamite russe du début du XXème siècle: le hiéromoine Antoine Boulatovitch et sa doctrine sur l’énergie divine, in Scrinium, t. 6: Patrologia Pacifica Secunda 392-409. Tatiana Senina, The status of divine revelation in the works of Hieromonk Anthony Bulatovich, in Scottish Journal of Theology 64:4 377–389.

Tatiana Sénina, La doctrine du hiéromoine Antoine Boulatovitch sur les idées et sa théorie de la connaissance, in Scrin

Scaptesyle

Scaptesyle is a genus of moths in the subfamily Arctiinae first described by Francis Walker in 1854. Palpi upturned reaching vertex of head. Antennae of male minutely ciliated. Tibia with long spurs. Forewings with stalked veins 4 and 5, vein 6 from below angle of cell and stalked veins 7,8 and 9. Hindwings with stalked veins 3,4 and 6,7. Vein 5 from above angle of cell and vein 8 from middle of cell. Scaptesyle aurigena Walker, 1863 Scaptesyle buergersi Gaede, 1926 Scaptesyle bicolor Walker, 1864 Scaptesyle bifasciata Snellen, 1904 Scaptesyle bipartita Rothschild, 1913 Scaptesyle bizone Rothschild, 1912 Scaptesyle dichotoma Meyrick, 1886 Scaptesyle dictyota Meyrick, 1886 Scaptesyle equidistans Lucas, 1890 Scaptesyle fovealis Hampson, 1903 Scaptesyle ixias Hampson, 1900 Scaptesyle luzonica Swinhoe, 1916 Scaptesyle middletoni Scaptesyle mirabilis Hampson, 1900 Scaptesyle monogrammaria Walker, 1862 Scaptesyle plumosus Rothschild, 1912 Scaptesyle sororigena Holloway, 2001 Scaptesyle subtricolor van Eecke, 1927 Scaptesyle tetramita Turner, 1940 Scaptesyle thestias Snellen, 1904 Scaptesyle tricolor Walker, 1854 Scaptesyle violinitens Rothschild, 1912 Scaptesyle aroa Bethune-Baker, 1904 Scaptesyle incerta Semper, 1899 Scaptesyle pseudoblabia Hampson, 1918 Scaptesyle rothschildi Draudt, 1914 Pitkin, Brian & Jenkins, Paul.

"Search results Family: Arctiidae". Butterflies and Moths of the World. Natural History Museum, London

Jim Ferlo

James Ferlo was a member of the Pennsylvania State Senate who represented the 38th Senatorial District from 2003-2015. His district consisted of parts of Allegheny and Armstrong counties, he did not run for reelection in 2014. Ferlo was born to Italian immigrant parents in the small upstate town of Rome, New York, credits part of his legislative effectiveness as being one of ten siblings. Ferlo was a liberal community activist in the City of Pittsburgh before being elected to Pittsburgh City Council in 1987, he served on council for 15 years until his election to the State Senate in 2002. Ferlo served as president of City Council from 1994 to 1997, he lives in Pittsburgh's Highland Park section. A Democrat, Ferlo was elected to the state senate in 2002, receiving 65 percent of the vote to 35 percent for Republican candidate Ted Tomson. In 2003, the political website PoliticsPA named him to "The Best of the Freshman Class" list. Ferlo was overwhelmingly re-elected in 2006 in his Democratic district.

In that race, Ferlo received 84 percent of the vote, while his opponent Joe Murphy of the Constitution Party received 16 percent. Ferlo came out as gay on September 23, 2014, thus becoming the Pennsylvania Senate's first gay legislator. Pennsylvania State Senate - Jim Ferlo official PA Senate website Ferlo for Senate official caucus website Project Vote Smart - Senator Jim Ferlo profile Follow the Money – Jim Ferlo 2006 2004 2002 campaign contributions James Ferlo Papers, 1963-2002, AIS 1998.02, Archives Service Center, University of Pittsburgh

Promises (Def Leppard song)

"Promises" is a 1999 song by British rock band Def Leppard from their album Euphoria. It was released as a single that year and reached No. 1 on the Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks chart and No. 38 on the Top 40 Mainstream. The song was featured on the second discs of their compilations Best of Def Leppard and Rock of Ages: The Definitive Collection, released in 2004 and 2005. A live version is featured on their live album Viva! Hysteria, released in October 2013, it is one of the few songs from that period of their career, performed live on successive tours other than the one directly supporting its parent album. This is an Enhanced CD-ROM where the Promises music video is recorded. "Promises" "Back in Your Face" Album Snippets "Back in Your Face" "Promises" "Worlds Collide" "Promises" "Paper Sun" In 2018, singer-songwriter Matt Nathanson included his cover of "Promises" on Pyromattia. The album is composed of Def Leppard covers and features songs from High'N' Dry, Pyromania and Euphoria.

Lyrics of this song at MetroLyrics