Frank Cifaldi

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Frank Cifaldi
Frank Cifaldi at E3 2005 (14601347).jpg
Cifaldi at the 2005 Electronic Entertainment Expo
Occupation Video game archivist, historian, and developer

Frank Cifaldi is a video game archivist, preservationist, historian, and developer. He is the director of the Video Game History Foundation[1][2] and has assisted in projects including Digital Eclipse's Mega Man Legacy Collection[3][4] and The Disney Afternoon Collection remasters.[5] He is also known for his extensive personal collection of video game periodicals.[6][7] Cifaldi has also researched early video game advertising[8] early Nintendo prototypes,[9] and the official Super Mario Bros. release date.[10] He presented on games preservation at the 2016 Game Developers Conference.[11][12] Cifaldi is additionally a former features editor of Gamasutra[13] and a former host of the Retronauts podcast.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bowman, Mitch (February 27, 2017). "Inside The Video Game History Foundation". Polygon. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  2. ^ Alexandra, Heather (February 27, 2017). "New Non-Profit Has Plans To Save Gaming's Past". Kotaku. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  3. ^ Alexandra, Heather (December 12, 2017). "Why Some Video Games Are In Danger of Disappearing Forever". Kotaku. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  4. ^ Sarkar, Samit (June 8, 2015). "Mega Man Legacy Collection remasters first six games this summer". Polygon. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  5. ^ Hall, Charlie (April 18, 2017). "Why is The Disney Afternoon Collection so good? Because one of the devs helped pirate it as a kid". Polygon. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  6. ^ Corriea, Alexa Ray (September 25, 2014). "These Lord of the Rings games were never released". Polygon. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  7. ^ Hamilton, Kirk (January 29, 2014). "The First And Only English-Language Review Of Super Mario Bros". Kotaku. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  8. ^ Alexandra, Heather (December 19, 2016). "It Took Five Years For One Man To Find The First NES Advertisement". Kotaku. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  9. ^ Hall, Charlie (August 16, 2016). "This could be the first code Satoru Iwata ever wrote for Nintendo". Polygon. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  10. ^ Hamilton, Kirk (March 28, 2012). "Nobody Knows When the Hell Super Mario Bros. Was Released". Kotaku. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  11. ^ Orland, Kyle (March 20, 2016). "How the demonization of emulation devalues gamings heritage". Ars Technica. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  12. ^ Hall, Charlie (March 18, 2016). "Emulation isn't a dirty word, and one man thinks it can save gaming's history". Polygon. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  13. ^ Kohler, Chris (April 9, 2007). "Take Frank Cifaldi's Job at Gamasutra". Wired. Retrieved January 22, 2018.
  14. ^ Parish, Jeremy (October 27, 2015). "Cover Story: Retronauts Looks Back 30 Years to the NES Launch". USgamer. Retrieved January 22, 2018.

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