Fred Kelsall

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Fred Kelsall
Personal information
Full name Frederick Thomas Kelsall
Born c. 1906
Great Sankey, Warrington, Lancashire, England
Died 14 May 1931 (aged 25)
Eccleston, St Helens, Lancashire, England
Playing information
Weight 14 st 8 lb (93 kg; 204 lb)
Position Prop

Club
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1925–30 Widnes 188 11
Representative
Years Team Pld T G FG P
Cheshire
1930 England 1 0 0 0 0
Source: [1][2]

Frederick Thomas Kelsall (c. 1906 –14 May 1931) was an English professional rugby league footballer of the 1920s and 1930s. He played at representative level for England, and Cheshire, and at club level for Widnes, as a prop, i.e. number 8 or 10, during the era of contested scrums.[1]

Background[edit]

Fred Kelsall was born in Great Sankey, Warrington, Lancashire, and he died aged 25 in Eccleston, St Helens, Lancashire.

Described as the heaviest and most skilled of the Widnes pack that won an unlikely victory at Wembley in 1930, Fred Kelsall died in a motorcycle accident (in which his pillion passenger Miss Minnie Salt and two persons on another motorcycle were also killed) in May 1931.[3]

Playing career[edit]

International honours[edit]

Fred Kelsall won a cap for England while at Widnes in 1930 against Other Nationalities.[2]

Challenge Cup Final appearances[edit]

Fred Kelsall played prop, in Widnes' 10-3 victory over St. Helens in the 1929–30 Challenge Cup Final during the 1929–30 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 3 May 1930 in front of a crowd of 36,544.

County Cup Final appearances[edit]

Fred Kelsall played left-prop, i.e. number 8, in Widnes' 4-5 defeat by Wigan in the 1928–29 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1928–29 season at Wilderspool Stadium, Warrington on Saturday 24 November 1928.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018. 
  2. ^ a b "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018. 
  3. ^ "Widnes Weekly News", Friday 15 May 1931
  4. ^ "1928-1929 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2015. 

External links[edit]