Frederick C. Kulow

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Frederick C. Kulow
Born1925
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
DiedDecember 2, 2004
New London, New Hampshire
OccupationEntrepreneur, Baseball player

Frederick C. Kulow (born in 1925, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; died December 2, 2004 in New London, New Hampshire) was an independent U.S. businessman who founded several businesses focusing primarily on nutrition and natural food products.

He received his bachelor's degree from Duke University and attended the graduate school of business administration at Harvard, as well as the marketing management program at Columbia University Graduate School of Business.

A skilled athlete in his youth, he was drafted by the Detroit Tigers and the Washington Senators baseball teams. Kulow served in the U.S. Navy from 1946 to 1955, and reached the rank of lieutenant commander.

Before starting his own businesses, Kulow was group president of Ward Foods Inc. in New York City; president and chief executive officer of Educator Biscuit Co. Inc. in Lowell, Massachusetts; corporate group vice president for Fairmont Foods Co. Inc. in Lowell; corporate group vice president for Fairmont Foods Co. in Omaha, Neb.; national sales manager for Pepperidge Farm Inc. in Norwalk, Conn.; and sales manager for Continental Baking Co. in Rye, N.Y.

The companies Kulow founded included Health from the Sun, Borlind of Germany, All Terrain, Bioriginal Food & Science, Bee Pollen from England, and Sanhelios. Kulow also pioneered many natural products categories including essential fatty acids and pollen/propolis, his companies imported products from Germany, France, Canada, England, Denmark, Switzerland and Bermuda.

Kulow's greatest contribution to the natural foods industry is considered to be his victory over the U.S. Food and Drug Administration concerning the ability to sell essential fatty acids. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) argued that EFAs (e.g., evening primrose oil, flax oil, borage oil, black currant oil and combinations) were unapproved food additives. Kulow's victory was significant because the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act was altered to bar the FDA from using the "unapproved additive" argument to regulate dietary supplements.

Kulow also served as a chairman of the Supply Side of the Natural Nutritional Foods Association and a member of its boards of directors, he served on the board of directors of Borlind of Germany, All Terrain and Bioriginal Food & Science until his death. He also taught business at St. Joseph's College.

He was a family man as well, he married Polly Mattson and together they had 5 children, Linda, Rick, Rob, Brad and David Kulow. He was also a grandfather of 12 children Torrey, Kate, Kim, Nick, Haley, Alex, Laurel, Spencer, Emma, Doug, Tina and John Kulow.

Bibliography[edit]

  • (2004). "Frederick Kulow of New London, N.H., 79, entrepreneur." Boston Herald. December 6.