Gerry Cowper

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Gerry Cowper
Born
Geraldine Cowper

(1958-06-23) 23 June 1958 (age 61)
London, England
OccupationActress
Years active1970–2006, 2009, 2014-2015
Spouse(s)Mark Foley (1998–2006)[1]
Children2

Geraldine "Gerry" Cowper (born 23 June 1958) is an English actress who is best known for playing Rowan Morrison in the 1973 British Lion classic horror film, The Wicker Man and later as Rosie Miller in EastEnders. In the mid-1980s she took the part of Clare France in After Henry on BBC radio and also appeared on television as Jim Hacker's daughter in Yes Minister.

Career[edit]

Cowper was Clare France, the youngest of the female triumvirate in the BBC Radio 4 comedy After Henry, which also starred Prunella Scales and Joan Sanderson. Whilst Scales and Sanderson reprised their roles in the later television version, Cowper was considered too old to play a teenager on screen and the role went to Janine Wood.[2]

Cowper also played Lucy Hacker, the daughter of Jim Hacker, in the BBC comedy series Yes Minister, although only in one episode, she featured in two episodes of Only Fools and Horses – "Tea for Three" and "The Frog's Legacy" – as Trigger's niece Lisa, and also appeared in Bachelor Father. In her early teens, Cowper made an uncredited appearance in Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy (1972) and played Rowan Morrison in the horror film The Wicker Man (1973).

Just as David Spinx, her on-screen EastEnders partner, had small roles in the series prior to playing Keith Miller, Cowper had briefly played Lindsay, the mother of a schizophrenic called Matt, in April 2002, she appeared in an episode of Law & Order: UK in 2014 as Hope Corday.

TV and filmography[edit]

Personal life[edit]

Cowper is the older sister of actress Nicola Cowper and the twin sister of the late Jackie Cowper, who was also an actress.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rankin, David (16 June 2006). "TV star's 'dangerous' husband behind bars". Surrey Comet. Newsquest. Retrieved 4 August 2017.
  2. ^ "After Henry". BBC Comedy. Retrieved 4 August 2017.

External links[edit]