HD 210277

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HD 210277
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Aquarius
Right ascension  22h 09m 29.8657s[1]
Declination −07° 32′ 55.1630″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 6.63
Characteristics
Spectral type G0V
U−B color index 0.43
B−V color index 0.773
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv)−24.1 km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: 85.462±0.072[1] mas/yr
Dec.: −450.544±0.067[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π)46.9229 ± 0.0481[1] mas
Distance69.51 ± 0.07 ly
(21.31 ± 0.02 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV)4.99
Details
Mass1.09 M
Radius1.1 ± 0.05 R
Luminosity1.2 L
Temperature5532 ± 14 K
Metallicity0.19 ± 0.04
Age6.93 G years
Other designations
NLTT 53073, SAO 145906, BD-08° 5818, Gl 848.4, HIP 109378, GJ 9769, LTT 8887, GCRV 13920, PPM 206033
Database references
SIMBADdata
ARICNSdata
Extrasolar Planets
Encyclopaedia
data

HD 210277 is a 7th magnitude star in the constellation of Aquarius. It is a yellow dwarf star (spectral type G0V) with a mass around 0.92 times that of our Sun.[2] Since its distance is about 70 light years, it is not visible to the unaided eye. With binoculars it is easily visible.

The star has a extrasolar planet that has a minimum mass greater than Jupiters orbiting it in 442 days.[3] Claims were made in 1999 that a dust disk around the star HD 210277, similar to that produced by the Kuiper Belt had been imaged, lying between 30 and 62 AU from the star.[4] However, observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope failed to detect any infrared excess at 70 micrometres or at 24 micrometres wavelengths.[5][6]

Planetary system[edit]

The only known planet was discovered using 34 radial velocity measurements taken from 1996 to 1998 at W. M. Keck Observatory.[3]

The HD 210277 planetary system[7]
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
b >1.29 ± 0.11 MJ 1.138 ± 0.066 442.19 ± 0.50 0.476 ± 0.017

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Brown, A. G. A.; et al. (Gaia collaboration) (August 2018). "Gaia Data Release 2: Summary of the contents and survey properties". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 616. A1. arXiv:1804.09365. Bibcode:2018A&A...616A...1G. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201833051. Gaia DR2 record for this source at VizieR.
  2. ^ Gonzalez; et al. (1999). "Parent Stars of Extrasolar Planets. IV. 14 Herculis, HD 187123, and HD 210277". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 511 (2): L111–L114. Bibcode:1999ApJ...511L.111G. doi:10.1086/311847.
  3. ^ a b Marcy, Geoffrey W.; et al. (1999). "Two New Planets in Eccentric Orbits". The Astrophysical Journal. 520 (1): 239–247. arXiv:astro-ph/9904275. Bibcode:1999ApJ...520..239M. doi:10.1086/307451.
  4. ^ Trilling, D. E.; et al. (2000). "Circumstellar Dust Disks around Stars with Known Planetary Companions". The Astrophysical Journal. 529 (1): 499–505. Bibcode:2000ApJ...529..499T. doi:10.1086/308280.
  5. ^ Beichman, C. A.; et al. (2005). "Planets and Infrared Excesses: Preliminary Results from a Spitzer MIPS Survey of Solar-Type Stars". The Astrophysical Journal. 622 (2): 1160–1170. arXiv:astro-ph/0412265. Bibcode:2005ApJ...622.1160B. doi:10.1086/428115.
  6. ^ Bryden, G.; et al. (2009). "Planets and Debris Disks: Results from a Spitzer/MIPS Search for Infrared Excess". The Astrophysical Journal. 705 (2): 1226–1236. Bibcode:2009ApJ...705.1226B. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/705/2/1226.
  7. ^ Butler, R. P.; et al. (2006). "Catalog of Nearby Exoplanets". The Astrophysical Journal. 646 (1): 505–522. arXiv:astro-ph/0607493. Bibcode:2006ApJ...646..505B. doi:10.1086/504701.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: Sky map 22h 09m 29.8657s, −07° 32′ 55.155″