HD 66141

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50 G. Canis Minoris
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Canis Minor
Right ascension 08h 02m 15.94s
Declination +2° 20′ 4.45″
Apparent magnitude (V) +4.39
Characteristics
Spectral type K2III[1]
Astrometry
Parallax (π)12.84 mas ± 0.25 mas mas
Distance254 ± 6.5 ly
(77.9 ± 2 pc)
Details
Mass1.1 ± 0.1[1] M
Radius21.4 ± 0.6[1] R
Luminosity174 L
Surface gravity (log g)1.3 ± 0.5,[2] 1.78 ± 0.04[citation needed] cgs
Temperature4305 ± 15[2] K
Metallicity-0.32 ± 0.034[1]
Rotation1.5[2]
Age6.84 ± 1.39 × 109[1] years
Other designations
HR 3145, HD 66141, BD+02°1854, FK5 2623, HIP 39311, SAO 116260, GC 10891, CCDM 08022+0221, 13 Puppis (obsolete)
Database references
SIMBADdata
Exoplanet Archivedata
Extrasolar Planets
Encyclopaedia
data

HD 66141, also known as HR 3145 and 50 G. Canis Minoris, is the main star of a binary system[citation needed][3] in the constellation Canis Minor. It is an orange K-type giant, approximately 254 light years from Earth. Its apparent magnitude is +4.39.

When first catalogued it was in the Puppis constellation and was designated "13 Puppis", but it subsequently migrated to Canis Minor.[4] Bode gave it the Bayer designation of Lambda Canis Minoris.[5]

Over 2003 to 2012 a starspot was periodically dimming its light.[2]

Planetary system[edit]

From December 2003 to January 2012, the team B.-C. Lee, I. Han, and M.-G. Park observed "HD 66141" with "the fiber-fed Bohyunsan Observatory Echelle Spectrograph (BOES) at Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO)".[2]

In 2012, a long-period, wide-orbiting planet was deduced by radial velocity. This was published in November.

The HD 66141 planetary system[1]
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
b >6 ± 0.3 MJ 1.2 ± 0.1 480.5 ± 0.5 0.07 ± 0.03

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "hd_66141_b". 
  2. ^ a b c d e B.-C. Lee; D. E. Mkrtichian; I. Han; M.-G. Park; K.-M. Kim (2012). "Detection of an exoplanet around the evolved K giant HD 66141". Astronomy & Astrophysics. arXiv:1211.2054Freely accessible. Bibcode:2012A&A...548A.118L. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201118014. 
  3. ^ SIMBAD?
  4. ^ Griffin, R. F. (1999). "Spectroscopic binary orbits from photoelectric radial velocities. Paper 148: HR 7955". The Observatory. 119: 272–283. Bibcode:1999Obs...119..272G. 
  5. ^ Wagman, Morton (2003). Lost Stars: Lost, Missing and Troublesome Stars from the Catalogues of Johannes Bayer, Nicholas Louis de Lacaille, John Flamsteed, and Sundry Others. Blacksburg, VA: The McDonald & Woodward Publishing Company. p. 460. ISBN 978-0-939923-78-6.