Hanriot LH.10

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LH.10-LH.16
Hanriot LH.10 Annuaire de L'Aéronautique 1931.jpg
LH.10
Role Civil trainer aircraft
National origin France
Manufacturer Hanriot
First flight 1930
Primary user Armée de l'Air
Number built 54

The Lorraine-Hanriot LH.10 was a family of training monoplanes built in France in the early 1930s, the most widely produced and well-known member of which was the LH.16, later known simply as the Hanriot H.16. It was a conventional parasol-wing monoplane with fixed tailskid undercarriage, the main units of which were mounted on outriggers attached to the wing struts; the pilot and instructor sat in tandem open cockpits.

Early members of the family all had radial engines, but the definitive LH.16 of 1933 had an inline engine within a neat cowling. This type was evaluated by the Armée de l'Air and an initial order for 60 machines was placed; this was soon amended to just 15 in the original trainer configuration, plus another 29 modified as observation aircraft with a mounting for a trainable machine gun in the rear cockpit. Following a brief career in military service, the H.16s were turned over to the Aviation Populaire for use as trainers.


Variants[edit]

  • LH.10 - initial version with Lorraine 5Pa engine (2 built)
  • LH.11 - version with Lorraine 5Pb engine (2 built)
    • LH.11bis
  • LH.12 - version with Salmson 9Ac engine (1 built)
  • LH.13 - version with Lorraine 5Pb engine (5 built)
  • LH.16 - definitive version with Renault 4Pdi engine (15 built)
    • H.16/1 - armed observation version of H.16 (29 built)

Operators[edit]

 France


Specifications (LH.16)[edit]

General characteristics

  • Crew: Two, pilot and instructor
  • Length: 8.28 m (26 ft 3 in)
  • Wingspan: 11.90 m (39 ft 1 in)
  • Height: 2.62 m (8 ft 8 in)
  • Wing area: 22.0 m2 (237 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 547 kg (1,206 lb)
  • Gross weight: 886 kg (1,953 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Renault 4Pdi, 90 kW (120 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 155 km/h (96 mph)
  • Range: 375 km (233 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 4,200 m (13,800 ft)

Armament

References[edit]

  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 470.
  • World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 896 Sheet 09.