SUMMARY / RELATED TOPICS

Harry Gregson-Williams

Harry Gregson-Williams is an English composer, orchestrator and music producer. He has written for video games and films, such as the Metal Gear series, Spy Game, Phone Booth, Man on Fire, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Déjà Vu, X-Men Origins: Wolverine, The Martian, the Shrek franchise, he is the older brother of composer Rupert Gregson-Williams. Gregson-Williams won a musical scholarship to St John's College School in Cambridge at the age of seven, where he was a child chorister, attended Stowe School, a boarding independent school in the civil parish of Stowe in Buckinghamshire, where he was a music scholar, followed by the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in London. 1999 ASCAP Award for Top Box Office Films – Antz 1999 BMI Film & TV Awards – Antz 1999 BMI Film & TV Awards – Enemy of the State 2001 ASCAP Award for Top Box Office Films – Chicken Run 2001 Annie Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement for Music Score an Animated Feature Production – Shrek 2001 BMI Film & TV Awards – Chicken Run 2002 BMI Film & TV Awards – Shrek 2005 BMI Film & TV Awards – Shrek 2 2005 BMI Film & TV Awards – Man on Fire 2005 Hollywood Film Award for Composer of the Year 2006 BMI Film & TV Awards – BMI Richard Kirk Award for Outstanding Career Achievement 2005 Satellite Award for Outstanding Original ScoreKingdom of Heaven 2009 BMI Film & TV Awards – The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian 2009 BMI Film & TV Awards – Eleventh Hour 2009 Brooklyn International Film Festival Certificate of Excellence – Em 1997 Saturn Award for Best Music – The Rock 1999 Annie Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement for Music in an Animated Feature Production – Antz 2001 Phoenix Film Critics Society Award for Best Original Score – Chicken Run 2002 Saturn Award for Best Music – Shrek 2002 Golden Satellite Award for Best Original Score – Spy Game 2002 BAFTA Anthony Asquith Award for Film Music – Shrek 2004 Annie Award for Outstanding Music in an Animated Feature Production – Sinbad: Legend of the Seven Seas 2004 World Soundtrack Award for Best Original Soundtrack of the Year – Shrek 2 2004 World Soundtrack Award for Soundtrack Composer of the Year – Shrek 2 2005 Annie Award for Music in an Animated Feature Production – Shrek 2 2006 Golden Globe for Best Original Score – Motion Picture – The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe 2006 World Soundtrack Award for Best Original Song Written for Film – "Can't Take It In" from The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe 2007 Grammy for Best Score Soundtrack Album for Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media – The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe 2007 World Soundtrack Award for Best Original Score of the Year – Shrek the Third 2007 World Soundtrack Award for Film Composer of the Year – Déjà Vu, Shrek the Third, The Number 23 and Flushed Away Harry Gregson-Williams on IMDb Facebook Artist profile at OverClocked ReMix Harry Gregson-Williams discography at MusicBrainz An interview with Harry Gregson-Williams Epicenter Games Interviews Harry Gregson-Williams, an interview with Harry Gregson-Williams regarding Metal Gear Solid 3: Snake Eater, from EpicenterGames Harry Gregson-Williams at Scorereviews.com

Danny Bakewell

Danny Joseph Bakewell is an American civil rights activist and entrepreneur. He is the owner of The Bakewell Company, which includes among its holdings the New Orleans radio station WBOK and the Los Angeles Sentinel newspaper, he is Chairman of the National Newspaper Publishers Association. Bakewell was raised in New Orleans, graduating from St. Augustine High School. Bakewell is the co-founder of the National Black United Fund, he served as President of The Brotherhood Crusade, a civil rights advocate organization, for over thirty years, before stepping down to focus on his other projects. In recent years, Bakewell has been focused on expanding and diversifying his firm The Bakewell Company, the largest minority-owned development firm on the West Coast, he purchased the Los Angeles Sentinel, the city's oldest and largest Black newspaper, in 2004. Soon after, in 2007, he purchased the New Orleans radio station WBOK. In 2009, Bakewell was elected Chairman of the National Newspaper Publishers Association.

Bakewell and his wife Aline have four grandchildren. Bakewell and his family reside in Bradbury, California. Bakewell Co. website Danny Bakewell's Huffington Post blogs "Compton: Corruption, Incompetence, or Just Business As Usual?"

Civil War of Wa

The Civil War of Wa or Great Rebellion of Wa was a period of disturbances and warfare in ancient Japan during the late Yayoi period. It is the oldest war in Japan, documented in writing. Peace was restored around 180, when the shaman queen Himiko of Yamatai-koku took control of the region; the war falls into Japan's protohistoric period. While the earliest Japanese national chronicles Kojiki and Nihon Shoki begin their accounts from the Age of the Gods, they are mythological in nature, the account in the Nihon Shoki is reliable as a history only after about the late 6th century; the Chinese Dynastic Histories are an important written source for Japanese history before the 6th century and contain the only written account of this 2nd century war. Japanese history is recounted in sections on the "barbarian" neighbours of China at the end of each dynastic history in the form of a footnote rather than a major chapter. Information on the conflict is limited; the earliest mention is in the Wei Zhi, part of the Records of the Three Kingdoms.

Subsequent histories mentioning the conflict such as the Book of the Later Han, the Book of Liang, the Book of Sui and the History of Northern Dynasties draw much from earlier works. The following are the complete passages of the Wei Zhi, the Book of the Later Han, the Book of Sui and the History of Northern Dynasties dealing with the civil war: The country had a man as ruler. For some seventy or eighty years after that there were disturbances and warfare. Thereupon the people agreed upon a woman for their ruler, her name was Pimiko. During the reigns of Huandi and Lingdi the country of Wa was in a state of great confusion and conflict raging on all sides. For a number of years, there was no ruler. A woman named Pimiko appeared. Remaining unmarried, she bewitched the populace. Thereupon they placed her on the throne. In the reign of Huandi and Lingdi that country, in great disorder, whose inhabitants had gone to war against each other. There was a woman there, named Himiko. In the reign of Lingdi that country, in great disorder, whose inhabitants had gone to war against each other.

The Book of Liang speaks of "great disturbances" between 178 and 183. There is no direct archaeological evidence for the civil war; however archaeological findings of stone or metal weapons and of defensive villages from the eastern Inland Sea to Kinki support the occurrence of battles during the Yayoi period. Though the basic course of events is the same in all of the histories, they differ in details and language. Due to the limited information provided in the sources various theories have been put forth by historians; the Yayoi period is characterised by the introduction of rice cultivation and metallurgy from China or Korea, the development towards an agrarian society and the establishment of a social class structure. In the mid Yayoi period, community leaders managed to extend their authority over small regions the size of present-day districts; these petty states established diplomatic contacts with China by the 1st century and the resulting increased influx of goods and technology or recognition of some local chieftains by China led to a further consolidation of political power.

The war is thought to have occurred around the chiefdom which Himiko came to rule. However the exact location of Yamatai in Japan is not known and a major source of discussion in ancient Japanese history with most scholars favouring a location in either northern Kyushu or Kinai, the latter being close to the Yamato Province, the former close to Yamato, with which it might share its name. All of the historical sources agree that the conflict happened in the latter part of the 2nd century and ended in the 180s; however it is variously quoted as having lasted from between five and eighty years. The distinction of great in the Book of Liang suggests that earlier fightings that are included in the longer time frames of other sources were comparably minor and not worth mentioning for the authors of the Liang shu; the cause of the war is not known. A smoldering political situation around the mid 2nd century or a power struggle between the Wa kingdoms have been named as possible origins; the number of chiefdoms known to the Chinese had been reduced from over a hundred before the war to around thirty at the time of Himiko.

The rebellion led to the formation of an early polity under Himiko's rule and as such is considered as a turning point between Yayoi and Kofun period. Five kings of Wa List of Japanese battles Tōdaijiyama Sword Brown, Delmer M.. The Cambridge History of Japan: Ancient Japan. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-22352-2. Retrieved 2011-03-24. Dykstra, Yoshiko Kurata. Sources of Japanese Tradition: From earliest times through the sixteenth century. Columbia University Press. ISBN 978-0-231-12139-2. Retrieved 2011-06-17. Kidder, Jonathan Edward. Himiko and Japan's elusive chiefdom of Yamatai: archaeology and mythology. University of Hawaii Press. ISBN 978-0-8248-3035-9. Retrieved 2011-06-17. Metevelis, Peter J.. Myth in History. Mythological Essays. 2. IUniverse. ISBN 0-595-22950-6. Goodrich, Luther Carrington. Japan in the Chinese dynastic histories: Later Han through Ming dynasties. P. D. and I