Hermann Homburg

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Hermann Robert Homburg
Head and shoulders of a man in formal dress with a bow tie, in an oval frame
Hermann Homburg as a member of the Adelaide Liedertafel in 1904
Attorney-General of South Australia
In office
22 December 1909 (1909-12-22) – 3 June 1910 (1910-06-03)
PremierArchibald Peake
Preceded bySamuel James Mitchell
Succeeded byBill Denny
In office
17 February 1912 (1912-02-17) – 21 January 1915 (1915-01-21)
PremierArchibald Peake
Preceded byBill Denny
Succeeded byAngas Parsons
In office
8 April 1927 (1927-04-08) – 17 April 1930 (1930-04-17)
PremierR. L. Butler
Preceded byBill Denny
Succeeded byBill Denny
Minister for Industry
In office
17 February 1912 (1912-02-17) – 21 January 1915 (1915-01-21)
PremierArchibald Peake
In office
8 April 1927 (1927-04-08) – 17 April 1930 (1930-04-17)
PremierR. L. Butler
Member of the South Australian Legislative Council for Central District No. 2
In office
1933 (1933) – 1941 (1941)
Preceded byJohn Herbert Cooke
Succeeded byErnest Anthoney
Member of the South Australian Legislative Assembly for Murray
In office
26 March 1927 (1927-03-26) – 5 April 1930 (1930-04-05)
Preceded byFrank Staniford, Harry Young
Succeeded byRobert Hunter, Frank Staniford
Parliamentary groupLiberal Federation
In office
3 November  1906 (1906-11-03) – 27 March 1915 (1915-03-27)
Preceded byWalter Duncan
Succeeded byGeorge Dunn
Parliamentary group
Personal details
Born(1874-03-17)17 March 1874
Norwood, South Australia
Died12 December 1964(1964-12-12) (aged 90)
Dulwich, South Australia
Resting placeCentennial Park Cemetery
Political partyLiberal and Democratic Union, Liberal Union, Liberal Federation
Spouse(s)
Emma Lydia Louisa Herring (m. 1897)
FatherRobert Homburg
RelativesRobert Homburg Jr. (brother)
Occupationpolitician and lawyer

Hermann Robert Homburg (17 March 1874 – 12 December 1964) was a South Australian politician and lawyer.

Early life[edit]

Homburg was born in Norwood and educated at Prince Alfred College and the University of Adelaide. Following his admission to the bar in 1897, he practised law at his father's legal firm, Homburg & Melrose. Homburg's German-born father, Robert Homburg, was also a prominent South Australian politician and lawyer. Robert Homburg had served as Attorney-General of South Australia on three separate occasions, and also, later, as a justice of the Supreme Court of South Australia, the first non-British migrant to be appointed to such a position in Australia.

Homburg supported participation in sport more than watching it, he was member and captain of the Glen Osmond Cricket Club and chairman of the North Adelaide Cycling Club.[1]

Before World War I[edit]

Representing his father's former electorate, Hermann Homburg served as a non-Labor Party member for Murray in the House of Assembly from 1906 to 1915, he became Attorney-General under Premier Archibald Peake in 1909 and also Minister for Industry from 1912 to 1915.

The outbreak of World War I in 1914 resulted in widespread distrust and persecution of German-Australians. In 1914, while he was Attorney-General, Homburg's government office in Adelaide was raided by soldiers with fixed bayonets.[citation needed] He soon fell victim to anti-German sentiment and resigned in early 1915 to avoid embarrassing the government in the forthcoming election.[2] Homburg wrote of a "campaign of lies and calumnies against me... because I am not of British lineage."

Between the wars[edit]

In 1927, Homburg successfully contested Murray again and returned to parliament, he served as Attorney-General and Minister for Industry in the R. L. Butler ministry from 1927 until losing his seat in 1930. From 1933 to 1941 he was a member of the Legislative Council, he was also a leader of Adelaide's secular German community during the interwar period.

Despite his many years of public service, Homburg's loyalties were once again questioned following the advent of World War II, his home and private office were searched and he was interned on 25 November 1940 but released after appeal on 21 December, under open conditional arrest, one condition being that he moved interstate. In January 1941 he relocated to Melbourne and then moved to Ballarat whereupon he retired from parliament; the judges at Homburg's appeal concluded, "it is obvious that one or more of the persons reporting may have a grudge against the objector Homburg and under pledge of secrecy be willing to lie to cause him distress and trouble."

After politics[edit]

Homburg returned to Adelaide in 1942 and continued to practice as a solicitor until his death in 1964, he wrote about his experiences during both wars in South Australian Lutherans and War-Time Rumours (1947).

References[edit]

  1. ^ "INTERESTING PEOPLE". The Mail (Adelaide) (21). South Australia. 21 September 1912. p. 2 (SECOND SECTION.). Retrieved 22 April 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  2. ^ "Personal". Table Talk (1539). Victoria, Australia. 21 January 1915. p. 6. Retrieved 22 April 2019 – via National Library of Australia.

Bibliography[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Samuel Mitchell
Attorney-General of South Australia
1909-1910
Succeeded by
Bill Denny
Preceded by
Bill Denny
Attorney-General of South Australia
1912-1915
Succeeded by
Herbert Angas Parsons
Preceded by
Bill Denny
Attorney-General of South Australia
1927-1930
Succeeded by
Bill Denny
South Australian House of Assembly
Preceded by
Walter Hughes Duncan
Member for Murray
1906–1915
Succeeded by
George Dunn
Preceded by
Frank Staniford
Harry Young
Member for Murray
1927–1930
Succeeded by
Robert Hunter
Frank Staniford
South Australian Legislative Council
Preceded by
John Herbert Cooke
George Henry Prosser
Member for Central District No. 2
1933–1941
Succeeded by
Ernest Anthoney