Hexanal

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Hexanal[1][2][3]
Hexanal.png
Names
IUPAC name
Hexanal
Other names
Hexanaldehyde
Aldehyde C-6
Caproic aldehyde
Capronaldehyde
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.567
UNII
Properties
C6H12O
Molar mass 100.16 g·mol−1
Appearance Clear liquid
Density 0.815
Melting point < −20 °C (−4 °F; 253 K)
Boiling point 130 to 131 °C (266 to 268 °F; 403 to 404 K)
-69.40·10−6 cm3/mol
Related compounds
Related aldehydes
Pentanal

Heptanal

Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Hexanal, also called hexanaldehyde or caproaldehyde is an alkyl aldehyde used in the flavor industry to produce fruity flavors.[4] Its scent resembles freshly cut grass, like cis-3-hexenal.[5] It is potentially useful as a natural extract that prevents fruit spoilage.[6] It occurs naturally, and contributes to a hay-like "off-note" flavor in green peas.[7]

The first synthesis of hexanal was published in 1907 by P. Bagard.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "MSDS for hexanal, from Physical & Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory". Oxford University. [dead link]
  2. ^ Hexanal, SAFETY DATA SHEET, 2010-2015
  3. ^ CAS: Hexanal
  4. ^ Hexanal Product Data Sheet Archived 2007-12-13 at the Wayback Machine. from Natural Advantage
  5. ^ Hexenal / Chemistry World, Royal Society of Chemistry, 27 November 2013
  6. ^ Sharkey, Jackie (23 June 2016). "Fruit spray developed by Guelph prof extends shelf life by 50 per cent". CBC News. Retrieved 21 August 2017. 
  7. ^ Roland, Wibke S. U.; Pouvreau, Laurice; Curran, Julianne; van de Velde, Fred; de Kok, Peter M. T. (5 October 2016). "Flavor Aspects of Pulse Ingredients". Cereal Chemistry. 94 (1): 58–65. doi:10.1094/CCHEM-06-16-0161-FI. Retrieved 2 March 2018. 
  8. ^ Molecule of the Week: Hexanal / American Chemical Society