History of cricket in South Africa from 1990–91 to 2000

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South Africa resumed official international cricket in 1991 after the moratorium imposed by the International Cricket Conference in 1970 was lifted. This had restricted official contact with South Africa as a response to the policy of apartheid and South Africa's refusal to select non-white players for their international sporting teams. It formed part of the wider sporting boycott of South Africa during the apartheid era.

The South African national team made a short tour of India in 1991. It then played in the 1992 Cricket World Cup in Australia and New Zealand. The decade saw a number of tours of South Africa by major international teams as well as the continued playing of domestic competitions.

Domestic cricket[edit]

The former Currie Cup was renamed the Castle Cup in 1990 and then the SuperSport Series in 1996.

Castle Cup 1990-91 to 1995-96[edit]

SuperSport Series 1996-97 to 1999-2000[edit]

Standard Bank Cup / B&H Series winners[edit]

International tours[edit]

1992–93 India[edit]

The first major tour of South Africa after the lifting of apartheid was by India. The series was the first official tour of the country for 23 years and the first ever by "a recognised non-white side".[1] A four–match Test match series was won 1–0 by South Africa who also won a seven–match One Day International (ODI) series 5–2.[1]

Despite cricket that Wisden described as "humdrum",[1] the tour was considered a wider social and political success and was dubbed the "Friendship Tour". It was the first Test series in which an independent umpire stood in matches, and introduction by the International Cricket Conference to try to reduce the possibility for umpires to be biased in their decisions. Television replays to deal with run out and stumping line decisions were also used for the first time on the tour, an innovation introduced by the United Cricket Board of South Africa.[1] Both innovations have become standard in the years since the tour.

1993–94 Australia[edit]

The second major tour of post-apartheid South Africa was by Australia in early 1994. South Africa had just toured Australia and drawn a three–Test series 1–1, and the return three–match Test tour produced the same result.[2] Four ODIs were also played during the tour between the two evenly matched teams.[3] The ODI series was also tied.[2]

The tour was marred by two incidents during the first Test match where Australian players were sanctioned by the match referee and by the Australian Cricket Board for verbal abuse of their opponents, but was otherwise considered a success.[2][4]

1994–95 New Zealand[edit]

The New Zealand national cricket team toured South Africa from November 1994 to January 1995 and played a three-match Test series against South Africa. South Africa won the Test series 2–1. New Zealand also competed in the Mandela Trophy with South Africa and Pakistan but were eliminated in the group stage.

1994–95 Pakistan[edit]

The Pakistan national cricket team toured South Africa from November 1994 to January 1995, prior to visiting Zimbabwe. Pakistan played one Test against the South Africa. South Africa won the Test match by 324 runs. Pakistan also competed in the Mandela Trophy with South Africa and New Zealand but were defeated by South Africa 2-0 in the best-of-three finals.

1995–96 England[edit]

1996–97 India[edit]

1996–97 Australia[edit]

1997–98 Pakistan[edit]

1997–98 Sri Lanka[edit]

The Sri Lanka national cricket team toured South Africa in March 1998. This was the first time Sri Lanka had toured South Africa on a Test tour. South Africa won the series 2-0.

1998–99 West Indies[edit]

1999–2000 Zimbabwe[edit]

The Zimbabwe national cricket team played their first Test match in South Africa in October and November 1999. South Africa won the Test match, which was the first to be held at Springbok Park in Bloemfontein, easily as well as a return match played immediately afterwards at Bulawayo in Zimbabwe.[30]

Zimbabwe returned in January and February 2000 to compete in the 2000 Standard Bank Triangular Tournament against South Africa and England but were eliminated at the group stage.

1999–2000 England[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d The Indians in Zimbabwe and South Africa, 1992-93, Wisden Cricketers' Almanack, 1993. Retrieved 2018-04-16.
  2. ^ a b c Bannister J (1995) The Australians in South Africa, 1993-94, Wisden Cricketers' Almanack, 1995. Retrieved 20178-04-12.
  3. ^ Brettig D (2018) Dangerous nostalgia at heart of rivalry, CricInfo, 2018-02-28. Retrieved 2018-04-12.
  4. ^ Jackson R (2014) The Joy of Six: Australia in South Africa, The Guardian, 2014-02-10. Retrieved 2018-04-12.
  5. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
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  9. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  10. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  11. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  12. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
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  15. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". 3 March 2016. 
  16. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". 3 March 2016. 
  17. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  18. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  19. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  20. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  21. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  22. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  23. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  24. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  25. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  26. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  27. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  28. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  29. ^ [1][dead link]
  30. ^ Manthorp N (2001) Test Match, South Africa v Zimbabwe, 1999-2000, Wisden Cricketers' Almanack, 2001. Retrieved 2018-04-14.
  31. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  32. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  33. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  34. ^ "The Home of CricketArchive". www.cricketarchive.co.uk. 
  35. ^ [2][dead link]

Further reading[edit]

  • South African Cricket Annual – various editions
  • Wisden Cricketers' Almanack – various editions