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History of the Houston Oilers

The Houston Oilers were a professional American football team who played in Houston, Texas from 1960 to 1996 before relocating and becoming the Tennessee Titans. The Oilers began play in 1960 as a charter member of the American Football League; the team won two AFL championships before joining the NFL as part of the AFL–NFL merger in the late 1960s. The Oilers competed in the East Division of the AFL before the merger, after which they joined the newly formed AFC Central; the Oilers throughout their existence were owned by Bud Adams and played their home games at the Astrodome for the majority of their time in Houston—Jeppesen Stadium and Rice Stadium hosted the Oilers for their first eight years. The Oilers were the first champions of the American Football League, winning the 1960 and 1961 contests, but they never won another championship; the Oilers appeared in the 1962 AFL Championship, losing in double overtime to their in-state rivals, the Dallas Texans. From 1978 to 1980, the Oilers, led by Bum Phillips and in the midst of the Luv Ya Blue campaign, appeared in the 1978 and 1979 AFC Championship Games.

The Oilers were a consistent playoff team from 1987 to 1993, an era that included both of the Oilers' only division titles, as well as the dubious distinction of being on the losing end of the largest comeback in NFL history. For the rest of the Oilers' time in Houston, they compiled losing seasons in every year outside the aforementioned high points; the Oilers' main colors were Columbia blue and white, with scarlet trim, while their logo was a simple derrick. Oilers jerseys were always Columbia white for away; the helmet color was Columbia blue with a white derrick from 1960 through 1965, silver with a Columbia blue derrick from 1966 through 1971, Columbia blue with a white and scarlet derrick from 1972 through 1974, before changing to a white helmet with a Columbia blue derrick beginning in 1975 and lasting the remainder of the team's time in Houston. Owner Bud Adams, who had threatened to move the team since the late 1980s, relocated the Oilers to Tennessee after the 1996 season, where they were known as the Tennessee Oilers for the 1997 and 1998 seasons.

The Oilers played the 1997 season in Memphis before moving to Nashville in 1998. In 1999, to coincide with the opening of their new stadium, Adams changed the team name to the Tennessee Titans and the color scheme from Columbia Blue and White to Titans Blue, Navy and Silver with scarlet accents; the franchise retained the Oilers' team history and records, while the team name was retired by then-NFL Commissioner Paul Tagliabue, thus preventing a future Houston NFL team from using the name. The NFL would return to Houston in 2002 with the Houston Texans; the Houston Oilers began in 1960 as a charter member of the American Football League. They were owned by Bud Adams, a Houston oilman, who had made several previous unsuccessful bids for an NFL expansion team in Houston. Adams was an influential member of the eight original AFL owners, since he, Dallas Texans/Kansas City Chiefs founder Lamar Hunt and Buffalo Bills founder Ralph Wilson were more financially stable than the other five; the Oilers appeared in the first three AFL championships.

They scored an important victory over the NFL when they signed LSU's Heisman Trophy winner, All-America running back Billy Cannon. Cannon joined other Oiler offensive stars such as quarterback George Blanda, flanker Charlie Hennigan, running back Charlie Tolar, guard Bob Talamini. After winning the first-ever AFL championship over the Los Angeles Chargers in 1960, they repeated over the same team in 1961, they lost to the Dallas Texans in the classic 1962 double-overtime AFL championship game, at the time the longest professional football championship game played. In 1962, the Oilers were the first AFL team to sign an active NFL player away from the other league, when wide receiver Willard Dewveall left the Bears to join the champion Oilers. Dewveall that year caught the longest pass reception for a touchdown in professional American football history, 99 yards, from Jacky Lee, against the San Diego Chargers; the Oilers won the AFL Eastern Division title again in 1967 became the first professional football team to play in a domed stadium, when they moved into Houston's Astrodome home of MLB's Houston Astros for the 1968 season.

The Oilers had played at Jeppesen Stadium at the University of Houston from 1960 to 1964, Rice University's stadium from 1965 to 1967. Adams had intended the team play at Rice from the first, but Rice's board of regents rejected the move. After the Astrodome opened for business, Adams attempted to move there, but could not negotiate an acceptable lease with the Houston Sports Association from whom he would sublease the Dome; the 1969 season, the last as an AFL team, tumble afterwards. They qualified for the playoffs, but were defeated by the Raiders 56–7, to finish the year with a record of 6–7–2; the years after the AFL-NFL Merger were not as kind to the Oilers, who sank to the bottom of the AFC Central division. After going 3–10–1 in 1970, they went 4–9–1 in 1971, suffered back-to-back 1–13 seasons in 1972–73, but by 197

Tito Satya

Tito Satya was a Nepali sitcom weekly television series that premiered in 2003. Deepak Raj Giri was the script writer and one of the main characters. Tito Satya aired every Thursday on Nepal Television. Integrating political and social topics into a comedy drama, Tito Satya was one of the most viewed programs in Nepal; the show ended in November 2015 after 12 years of continuous broadcast. Deepak Raj Giri as Deepak Deepa Shree Niraula as Deepa Gopal Adhikari as Twakendra Nirmal Sharma as Nirmal Boss called by teasing as Gaida Raj Acharya as Raj Gopal Nepal Gopal Dhakal as Chhande Mukunda Mainali Shishir Amgai Ram Mani Bhattarai Uddav Bhattarai Sine Adhikari Bhadragol Meri Bassai Jire khursani

Psych (season 3)

The third season of Psych aired in the United States on USA Network from July 18, 2008 to February 20, 2009. It consisted of 16 episodes. James Roday, Dulé Hill, Timothy Omundson, Maggie Lawson, Corbin Bernsen, Kirsten Nelson reprised their roles as the main characters. James Roday portrayed Shawn Spencer, a fake psychic detective who periodically consults for the Santa Barbara police department. A DVD of the season was released on July 21, 2009. Steve Franks continued to serve as showrunner for the third season. "I Know, You Know," performed by The Friendly Indians, continued to serve as the theme song for the series, though the Christmas-themed version used for the previous season's "Gus's Dad May Have Killed an Old Guy" was used again for "Christmas Joy." Mel Damski returned to the series to direct three episodes, while John Badham and Stephen Surjik returned to direct two each. Returning to direct one episode each were Steve Franks, John Landis, Eric Laneuville, Tim Matheson. New directors for the season, directing one episode each, were Jay Chandrasekhar, Martha Coolidge, Michael McMurray, Steve Miner, series star James Roday.

Andy Berman and Steve Franks returned to write three episodes each, while Josh Bycel, Anupam Nigam, Saladin K. Patterson, James Roday wrote two. Tim Meltreger returned to pen one episode. New writers for the season included Kell Cahoon, who wrote two episodes, Victoria Walker, who wrote one. James Roday continued to play fake psychic detective Shawn Spencer. Burton "Gus" Guster returned, portrayed by Dulé Hill. Timothy Omundson returned as Head Detective Carlton "Lassie" Lassiter, while Maggie Lawson continued to portray Juliet "Jules" O'Hara. Corbin Bernsen was kept on as Henry Spencer. Kirsten Nelson continued to receive star billing as Karen Vick, while her character was promoted to permanent Chief of the SBPD. Sage Brocklebank continued in his role as Officer Buzz McNab in six episodes. Liam James portrayed young Shawn. Cybill Shepherd joined the cast as Madeleine Spencer for three episodes. Rachael Leigh Cook joined the show, as Abigail Lytar. Phylicia Rashad reprised her role as Winnie Guster, while the role of Bill Guster was turned over to Keith David.

Ally Sheedy made her first appearance as the deranged serial killer Mr. Yang. Jimmi Simpson made his debut on the show, as Mary Lightly. Other prominent guests during the season included MacKenzie Astin, Justine Bateman, Sonja Bennett, Jere Burns, Faune A. Chambers, Gary Cole, Barry Corbin, Brooke D'Orsay, Jeff Fahey, Frank Gifford, Milena Govich, Elden Henson, Mickie James, Benjamin King, Emma Lahana, Ted Lange, Jane Lynch, Christopher McDonald, Bruce McGill, Ted McGinley, Ty Olsson, Kelly Overton, Richard Riehle, Shawn Roberts, Alan Ruck, Cassandra Sawtell, Jonathan Silverman, Todd Stashwick, Serinda Swan, Janet Varney, Steven Weber, Christopher Wiehl, Mykelti Williamson

Foxup

Foxup is a hamlet in the Yorkshire Dales in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England. The hamlet is 13 miles north west of Grassington. Foxup is in the civil parish of Halton Gill; the source of the River Skirfare starts here at the confluence of Cosh Beck. The bridge over Foxup Beck in the hamlet is 17th century and was listed Grade II in 1958; the village marks the end of the main road through Littondale. There are a number of Public Bridleways in and around the village; the area is a mixture of beef farming. Dairy farming is harder than in comparison to other locations further down the valley because of the limitations on grass types and transportation of dairy produce out of the area; the name Foxup is of Old English origin, meaning "fox valley", from fox and hop "small enclosed valley" in contrast to the adjacent valley of Cosh Beck, known as Harrop, meaning "hare valley". Media related to Foxup at Wikimedia Commons Foxup and Cosh on Littondale website

Nevada State Route 445

State Route 445 is a 41.890-mile-long state highway in Washoe County, Nevada. The route follows Pyramid Way, a major thoroughfare in the city of Sparks, connects the Reno metropolitan area to Pyramid Lake; the route is designated a Nevada Scenic Byway. SR 445 begins at Pyramid Way in Sparks. From there, it passes under Interstate 80 directly to the north and skirts the eastern edge of Victorian Square in downtown Sparks as it continues heading due north. After about 2 miles, the road curves to the northeast to serve as the primary link to the expanding northern valleys of Sparks, including Spanish Springs. Once outside of urban Sparks, SR 445 transitions to Pyramid Lake Road, more referred to as Pyramid Highway; the rural highway is four lanes for a seven-mile stretch passing through Spanish Springs. The road narrows to two lanes entering the more sparsely populated Palamino Valley north to Pyramid Lake; as the road turns more northeast, it enters the Pyramid Lake Indian Reservation. Shortly thereafter, the road curves northwest as it intersects State Route 446, following the western shore of Pyramid Lake.

The highway passes through Sutcliffe and comes to an end at Warrior Point Park Road, north of the town. The first two miles of State Route 445 in Sparks was designated State Route 32, with the remainder of the route comprising most of former State Route 33. SR 445 was crafted from these routes in the Nevada highway renumbering that took place in the late 1970s. 12.5 miles of the route became a Nevada Scenic Byway on June 27, 1996. The same stretch was designated a National Scenic Byway on July 15 of that same year; the Pyramid Highway/U. S. 395 Connector is a project taken by NDOT and RTC to improve mobility throughout the northern communities. The projects focuses on rerouting Pyramid Highway as a four to six-lane limited arterial roadway and freeway connecting U. S. 395 with an indirect connection to Sun Valley Boulevard, traveling along the mountainous region dividing Sun Valley with Sparks before merging with the original route. There is no set completion date; the entire route is in Washoe County.

United States portal U. S. Roads portal

Clarkesworld Magazine

Clarkesworld Magazine is an American online fantasy and science fiction magazine. It released its first issue October 1, 2006 and has maintained a regular monthly schedule since, publishing fiction by authors such as Elizabeth Bear, Kij Johnson, Caitlin R. Kiernan, Sarah Monette, Catherynne Valente, Jeff VanderMeer and Peter Watts. Clarkesworld Magazine is published or collected in a number of formats: All fiction is collected annually in print anthologies published by Wyrm Publishing Apps are available for Android, iPad and iPhone devices EPUB, Amazon Kindle, Mobipocket ebook editions of each issue are available for purchase All content is available online via the magazine website All fiction is available in audio format via podcast or direct download Ebook subscriptions for the Kindle and EPUB readers Clarkesworld was founded in October 2006. In May 2008, Clarkesworld began collecting its stories in annual print anthologies starting with Realms: The First Year of Clarkesworld Magazine. In January 2020, its editor Neil Clarke withdrew a short story by Isabel Fall at Fall's request, "I Sexually Identify as an Attack Helicopter", after Fall had been harassed by people who suspected the story of trolling or transphobia.

Winner 2006 Million Writers Award for "Best New Online Magazine" Winner 2006 Million Writers Award for "Urchins, While Swimming" by Catherynne M. Valente Nominee 2007 Bram Stoker Award for Short Fiction, "There's No Light Between Floors" by Paul Tremblay Finalist 2007 Shirley Jackson Award for Short Fiction, "The Third Bear" by Jeff VanderMeer Finalist 2007 Shirley Jackson Award for Short Fiction, "Something in the Mermaid Way" by Carrie Laben Finalist 2007 WSFA Small Press Award, "The Third Bear" by Jeff VanderMeer Finalist 2007 WSFA Small Press Award, "Orm the Beautiful" by Elizabeth Bear Named SciFi.com Site of the Week: August 29, 2007 Winner 2009 Chesley Awards for Best Magazine Cover, "Floating Fish" by Mats Minnhagen Nominee 2009 Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine Nominee 2009 World Fantasy Special Award: Non-Professional Nominee 2009 World Fantasy Award for Best Short Fiction, "A Buyer's Guide to Maps of Antarctica", Catherynne M. Valente Nominee 2009 Nebula Award for Best Short Story, "Non-Zero Probabilities", N. K. Jemisin Winner 2009 Nebula Award for Best Short Story, "Spar", Kij Johnson Winner 2010 Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine Nominee 2010 Hugo Award for Best Short Story, "Non-Zero Probabilities", N. K. Jemisin Nominee 2010 Hugo Award for Best Short Story, "Spar", Kij Johnson Finalist 2010 Locus Award for Best Magazine, finished 4th Finalist 2010 Locus Award for Best Short Story, "Spar", Kij Johnson, finished 2nd Nominee 2010 Chesley Awards for Best Magazine Cover, "Brain Tower", Kazuhiko Nakamura Finalist 2010 Parsec Award for Best Speculative Fiction Story, "The Things", Peter Watts Nominee 2010 World Fantasy Special Award: Non-Professional Nominee 2010 BSFA Award for Best Short Story, "The Things", Peter Watts Winner 2010 Shirley Jackson Award for Best Short Story, "The Things", Peter Watts Winner 2011 Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine Nominee 2011 Hugo Award for Best Short Story, "The Things", Peter Watts Finalist 2011 Locus Award for Best Short Story, "The Things", Peter Watts Finalist 2011 Locus Award for Best Short Story, "Thirteen Ways of Looking at Space/Time", Catherynne M. Valente Nominee 2011 Chesley Awards for Best Magazine Cover, "Warm", Sergio Rebolledo Nominee 2011 Chesley Awards for Best Magazine Cover, "Honeycomb", Julie Dillon Nominee 2011 Chesley Awards for Best Magazine Cover, "Soulhunter", Andrey Lazarev Nominee 2011 Nebula Award for Best Short Story, "The Cartographer Wasps and the Anarchist Bees", E. Lily Yu Nominee 2011 Nebula Award for Best Novella, "Silently and Very Fast", Catherynne M. Valente Finalist 2012 Locus Award for Best Magazine Finalist 2012 Locus Award for Best Short Story, "The Cartographer Wasps and the Anarchist Bees", E. Lily Yu Winner 2012 Locus Award for Best Novella, "Silently and Very Fast", Catherynne M. Valente Nominee 2012 Hugo Award for Best Short Story, "The Cartographer Wasps and the Anarchist Bees", E. Lily Yu Nominee 2012 Hugo Award for Best Novella, "Silently and Very Fast", Catherynne M. Valente Nominee 2012 Hugo Award for Best Editor Short Form, Neil Clarke Nominee 2012 World Fantasy Award for Best Short Fiction, "The Cartographer Wasps and the Anarchist Bees", E. Lily Yu Nominee 2012 World Fantasy Award for Best Novella, "Silently and Very Fast", Catherynne M. Valente Nominee 2012 World Fantasy Special Award: Non-Professional Winner 2012 Chesley Awards for Best Magazine Cover, "New World" by Ken Barthelmey Finalist 2013 Locus Award for Best Magazine Nominee 2013 Hugo Award for Best Editor Short Form, Neil Clarke Winner 2013 Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine Finalist 2014 Locus Award for Best Magazine Nominee 2014 Hugo Award for Best Editor Short Form, Neil Clarke Winner 2014 World Fantasy Special Award: Non-Professional Kate Baker, Neil Clarke and Sean Wallace for Clarkesworld Winner 2014 British Fantasy Award for Best Magazine/Periodical Neil Clarke, Editor-in-Chief Sean Wallace, October 2006 – present Kate Baker, Podcast Director, October 2009 – present, Non-Fiction Editor, January 2013 – present Gardner Dozois, Reprint Editor, April 2013 – May 2018 Jeremy L.

C. Jones, September 2010 – December 2014 Jason Heller, Non-Ficti