Hoosier Park

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Harrah's Hoosier Park Racing & Casino
Location Anderson, Indiana
Address 4500 Dan Patch Circle
Opening dateJune 2008
Total gaming space92,000 sq ft (8,500 m2)
Casino typeRacino
OwnerCaesars Entertainment
CoordinatesCoordinates: 40°04′20″N 85°38′20″W / 40.07222°N 85.63889°W / 40.07222; -85.63889
Websitehoosierpark.com

Harrah's Hoosier Park Racing & Casino is a racino including a standardbred racetrack located in Anderson, Indiana, approximately 30 miles northeast of Indianapolis. It is owned and operated by Caesars Entertainment; the facility features live harness racing from April through October, casino gaming, restaurants, a gift shop, and entertainment.

The $300,000 Dan Patch Stakes was established at Hoosier Park in 1994 and has become a tradition that highlights some of the best athletes in the sport of harness racing; the 2017 Breeders Crown, harness racing's annual series of 12 championship events valued at $6 million, was contested at Hoosier Park on October 27 & 28.[1]

Hoosier Park offers off-track betting (OTB) at three locations in Indiana: Clarksville, Indianapolis, and New Haven. Hoosier Park also offers simulcast wagering year-round.

Hoosier Park has hosted musicians such as The Beach Boys, The Fabulous Thunderbirds, and Billy Currington.

History[edit]

In 1990, Virgil E. Cook, a prominent local businessman and longtime resident of Anderson, Indiana, donated 110 acres (0.45 km2) of commercial real estate to the city for the sole purpose of developing a pari-mutuel racing facility. In 1992, Churchill Downs Incorporated announced plans to purchase Indiana's only pari-mutuel license from The Anderson Park Group headed by Louis Carlo and open a racetrack on the site of the land donated by Cook, it was the first racetrack outside Kentucky owned by Churchill Downs since 1939. In February 1994 a contract was signed for the construction of Hoosier Park; the construction of the facility cost approximately $13 million. On September 1, 1994, the track finally opened. A crowd of 7,633 came to the grand opening of the standardbred season; the track announces plans to open four off-track betting facilities in Indiana. On October 7, 1995, the first Indiana Derby was run.

Churchill Downs sold Hoosier Park in April 2007 for $8.2 million to Centaur Group.

Legislation was passed shortly after April 2007 to permit slot machines at both tracks, converting them to racinos. Both tracks were legislated to get a 55 percent share of the estimated $325 million the 2,000 slots at each of the state's two tracks were expected to generate annually; this would also increase the purse sizes of the races.

Hoosier Park Casino opened to the public on June 2, 2008.[2]

In 2001, Indiana Downs became the second horse racing track in the state. Initially located in Fairland, Indiana; it was later annexed into nearby Shelbyville, Indiana.

The Indiana Derby was once held at Hoosier Park but is now held at Indiana Grand Racing & Casino.

In 2018, Caesars Entertainment bought Hoosier Park from Centaur Holdings, along with Indiana Grand;[3] the company stated that it might rebrand the property as Harrah's Hoosier Park.[4]

Physical attributes[edit]

The track is a seven-eighths of a mile dirt oval. There is no turf course.

Racing[edit]

Stakes races at Hoosier Park include:

  • The Dan Patch Stakes
  • The Nadia Lobell
  • Kentuckiana Stallion Management
  • Centaur Trotting Classic
  • The Hoosier Park Pacing Derby
  • The Elevation
  • The Jenna's Beachboy
  • The Moni Maker
  • The Circle City
  • The Madison County
  • The Pegasus
  • The Monument Circle
  • The Carl Erskine
  • The USS Indianapolis Mem.
  • The Crossroads of America

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ AP 5:10 p.m. EDT October 29, 2014 (2014-10-29). "Breeders Crown sites announced through 2017". Usatoday.com. Retrieved 2016-05-26.
  2. ^ http://southerngaming.com/?p=740
  3. ^ "Caesars' purchase of two Indiana racinos finalized". The Times of Northwest Indiana. July 17, 2018. Retrieved 2018-07-17.
  4. ^ Lindsey Erdody (July 6, 2018). "Caesars steps into unfamiliar role in Indiana: horse track operator". Indianapolis Business Journal. Retrieved 2018-07-17.

External links[edit]