Ibn Barrajan

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Abu-l-Hakam Abd al-Salam ibn Abd al-Rahman ibn Mohammad ibn Barrajan (Arabic: عبد السلام بن عبد الرحمن بن محمد بن برجان) (born in Seville where he lived, he died in Marrakesh 1141) was one of the greatest Sufi figures of Al-Andalus and a hadith scholar.[1] He spread his teachings in the first half of the 12th century, he wrote a two-volume commentary on the names of Allah, two famous tafseers, Idah al-hikma bi Ahkam al-'Ibra Wisdom Deciphered The Unseen Discovered, which exists in a critical edition.[2][3] and Tanbih al-Afham Ila Tadabbur al-Kitab al-Hakim wa Ta'arruf al-Ayat wa-l-Naba al-'Athim, which is currently printed in 3 editions.[4][5][6] Ibn Barrajan is most famous for his prediction of the conquering of Jerusalem from the crusaders by Salahudeen Ayyubi, only being a few days off,[7] his writings had a great influence on Ibn Arabi[8]who was quite sceptical of Ibn Barrajan's methods of prognostication of the Jerusalem conquest calling them 'Ilm al-Huruf.[9]

He died in prison in Marrakesh, when he was summoned to that city by the Almoravid sultan who feared his influence.[10] Against the wishes of the sultan he received an official burial on the initiative of Ibn Harzihim.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Denis Gril, "La <<lecture supérieure>> du Coran selon Ibn Barragan" in Arabica, Tome XLVII, Brill 2000, page 510, note 1: Ibn al-Abbar calls him "al-Lakhmi al-Ifriqi thumma al-Ishbili", someone from Africa who became a Sevilian.
  2. ^ Ibn 'Arabi, Muhyiddin I. Arabi, Cecilia Twinch, Pablo Beneito, Introduction to Contemplation of the holy mysteries and the rising of the divine lights, Anqa Publishing, 2008 , p. 116
  3. ^ A Qur'an Commentary by Ibn Barrajan of Seville ed. by Gerhard Boewering and Yusuf Casewit, Leiden and Boston: Brill 2016
  4. ^ Tanbih al-Afham Ila Tadabbur al-Kitab al-Hakim wa Ta'arruf al-Ayat wa-l-Naba al-'Athim, 5 Vols. Ed. Fateh Hoseni 'Abd al-Karim, 'Amman: Dar al-Nur al-Mubeen, 2016.
  5. ^ Tanbih al-Afham Ila Tadabbur al-Kitab al-Hakim wa Ta'arruf al-Ayat wa-l-Naba al-'Athim, 5 Vols, Ed. Ahmed Farid al-Mazyadi, Beirut: Dar al-Kotob al-Ilmiyyah, 2013.
  6. ^ Tanbih al-Afham Ila Tadabbur al-Kitab al-Hakim wa Ta'arruf al-Ayat wa-l-Naba al-'Athim, 2 Vols Ed. Muhammad al-'Adluni, Casablanca: Dar al-Thaqafah, 2011.
  7. ^ The Mystics of al-Andalus, Yusuf Casewit, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2017, Pg 294.
  8. ^ Claude Addas, in Salma Khadra Jayyusi and Manuela Marín, eds., Handbuch der Orientalistik, Part 1, Volume 12, Der Nahe und Mittlere Osten. The legacy of Muslim Spain, BRILL, 1992, page 921 and 922 and passim (see index)
  9. ^ Ibn Barraǧān and Ibn ʿArabī on the prediction of the capture of Jerusalem in 583/1187 by Saladin, José Bellver, The University of Barcelona, 2014
  10. ^ Miguel Asín Palacios, Elmer H. Douglas, Howard W. Yoder, The mystical philosophy of Ibn Masarra and his followers, Brill Archive, 1978, p. 122 (on the life of Ibn Barrajan see footnote 8)
  • Sarh Asma' Allah Al-Husna: Comentario Sobre Los Nombres Mas Bellos De Dios Ibn Barrajan, Abd al-Salam ibn Abd al-Rahman ibn Muhammad; Madrid, 2000. 571pp. ISBN 9788400079765.
  • Paul Nwiya, "Notes sur quelques fragments inédits de la correspondence d'Ibn al-'Arif avec Ibn Barrajan"in Hesperis 43 (1956)
  • A. Faure, entry "Ibn Barradjan" in: N. Hanif, Biographical encyclopaedia of Sufis: Africa and Europe, Sarup & Sons, 2002, p. 64-65 [1] (retrieved 3-12-2010)