Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés
Nichia Gakuin
日亜学院
NichiaGakuinlogo.png
Nichia Gakuin, Buenos Aires 02.jpg
Address
Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés is located in Buenos Aires
Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés
Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés
Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés is located in Buenos Aires
Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés
Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés
Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés is located in Greater Buenos Aires
Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés
Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés
Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés is located in Buenos Aires Province
Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés
Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés
Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés is located in Argentina
Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés
Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés
Yatay 261/Pringles 268
Buenos Aires
Argentina
Coordinates Coordinates: 34°36′34″S 58°25′44″W / 34.609494°S 58.42893600000002°W / -34.609494; -58.42893600000002
Information
Type Private school
Website

Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés (IPAJ), also known as Nichia Gakuin (日亜学院), is a bilingual Spanish-Japanese elementary and middle school in Buenos Aires. It is the only school permitted by the Argentine Ministry of Education to require students to take Japanese,[1] and it is the only bilingual Spanish-Japanese school in Buenos Aires.[2] Its campus is located at Yatay 261 and Pringles 268 (two addresses for the same building) in the Almagro neighbourhood.[3]

Ricardo Braginski of Clarín wrote that the school represented the community of Japanese descent in Buenos Aires.[4]

History[edit]

The origins date from 1922.[2] The Nichia Gakuin school began offering courses in 1927 and the bilingual day school was first established in 1938. Its initial location was Patagones 84.[5] Argentine authorities closed the school in January 1945 upon the Argentine government declaring war against Japan as part of World War II.[6] It reopened in 1947 and took the formal name "Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés" in 1978. It moved to its current Yatay campus in 1984.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Ashihara, p. 80 (PDF p. 21/21), English abstract.
  2. ^ a b Nogués, Germinal. Buenos Aires, ciudad secreta (Obras Diversas). Penguin Random House Grupo Editorial Argentina, May 1, 2015. ISBN 950075231X, 9789500752312. Google Books PT263: "Misceláneas. En Yatay 261 se halla el único colegio japonés de Buenos Aires, cuyos orígenes se remontan a 1922 y opera como escuela bilingüe."
  3. ^ Home. Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés. Retrieved on January 23, 2017. "Yatay 261 / Pringles 268 CABA"
  4. ^ Braginski, Ricardo (2017-11-10). "Día de la Diversidad Cultural: una escuela judía y otra japonesa, unidas por una historia en común". Clarín. Retrieved 2018-01-23.
  5. ^ a b "Artículos Nichia Gakuin." Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés. Retrieved on January 23, 2017.
  6. ^ Masterson, Daniel M. and Sayaka Funada-Classen. The Japanese in Latin America. University of Illinois Press, 2004. ISBN 0252071441, 9780252071447. p. 146.

Further reading[edit]

  • Nichia gakuin 70 años (日亜学院創立70周年記念誌) or Instituto Privado Argentino Japonés, 1927-1997. Instituto Privado Argentino-Japonés. 1997 Printing. See profile at CiNii.
  • Sekiguchi, Shinji (関口伸治). バイリンガル校としての日亜学院 Buenos dias Buenos Aires. MarucciPress (マルッチ・プレス), 1992. See profile at CiNii.

External links[edit]