International Convention for the Suppression of Counterfeiting Currency

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The International Convention for the Suppression of Counterfeiting Currency (French: Convention internationale pour la répression du faux monnayage) is a 1929 League of Nations treaty whereby states agree to criminalise acts of currency counterfeiting. It remains the principal international agreement on currency counterfeiting.

States that ratify the Convention agree to criminalise the creation, use, and exportation or importation of counterfeit currency. Under the agreement, no distinction is to be made as to what currency is the subject of the crime. Under the treaty, currency counterfeiting is an extraditable offence. States also agree to establish a central office that will forward to all other state parties cancelled specimens of their state's currency and notify the other states when changes to their currency are implemented.

The Convention was concluded in Geneva on 20 April 1929 and entered into force on 22 February 1931, as of March 2016, it has 83 state parties and remains the primary international agreement on currency counterfeiting. It was most recently ratified by Serbia in March 2016. China, India, Japan, and the United States are among the states that have signed the treaty but have not ratified it.

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