Iowa City Press-Citizen

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Iowa City Press-Citizen
Iowa City press Herald.png
The January 4, 2008, front page of
Iowa City Press-Citizen
Type Daily newspaper
Format Broadsheet
Owner(s) Gannett Company
Founded 1920
Headquarters 123 N. Linn St.
Iowa City, IA 52245
 United States
Circulation 14,353 Daily[1]
Website www.press-citizen.com

The Iowa City Press-Citizen is a daily newspaper published in Iowa City, Iowa, USA, that serves most of Johnson County and portions of surrounding counties. Its primary competitors are The Gazette of Cedar Rapids, which has a news bureau in Iowa City, and The Daily Iowan, the University of Iowa's student newspaper.

History[edit]

The Press-Citizen was formed in 1920 from the merger of two newspapers: the Democratic Iowa State Press, founded in 1860, and the Republican Iowa City Citizen, founded in 1891. Merritt Spiedel bought the Press-Citizen in 1921; Spiedel's company merged with the Gannett Company in 1977.

In 1937, Spiedel hired architect Henry L. Fisk as consulting architect for a new Streamline Moderne style building for the paper.[2] Located at 319 E. Washington Street, the building also housed a mural by artist Mildred W. Pelzer, Symphony of Iowa. In 1966, the mural was restored by Forrest Bailey, who was commissioned by Richard Feddersen for the work, the painting was later donated by Fedderson to the Cedar Rapids Museum of Art.[3]

The Press-Citizen switched from afternoon to morning publication on September 15, 1997, on August 29, 1999, the Press-Citizen began publishing a Sunday edition that includes local news and sports sections packaged with the Sunday state edition of another Gannett newspaper, The Des Moines Register.[4]

On February 15, 2015, the Press-Citizen announced that it would be discontinuing the Sunday edition on March 1 of the same year.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gannett. "2006 Annual Report" (PDF). p. 12. Retrieved 2007-03-03. 
  2. ^ Rhomberg, Sue (October 27, 2016). "Mid-century modern architect had prolific local career". Iowa City, Iowa: Iowa City Press-Citizen. Retrieved 15 March 2017. 
  3. ^ "Graphic Reminders of State's Roots--Restored Painting Illustrate Iowa History. (pt. 1)". Iowa City, Iowa: The Iowa City Press-Citizen. January 15, 1966. p. 1. Retrieved 14 March 2017 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read and "Twofold Value Seen in Restoring Paintings (pt. 2)". Iowa City, Iowa: The Iowa City Press-Citizen. January 15, 1966. p. 3. Retrieved 14 March 2017 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  4. ^ Iowa City Press-Citizen. "Press-Citizen History". Retrieved 2007-03-03. 

External links[edit]