Irgandı Bridge

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Irgandı Bridge
Irgandı Köprüsü
BURSA-IRGANDI KÖPRÜSÜ 2007 - panoramio.jpg
Irgandı bridge in Bursa, Turkey
Coordinates 40°10′54″N 29°04′16″E / 40.1818°N 29.0710°E / 40.1818; 29.0710Coordinates: 40°10′54″N 29°04′16″E / 40.1818°N 29.0710°E / 40.1818; 29.0710
Crosses Gökdere
Locale Bursa, Turkey
Characteristics
Design Arch bridge
Material Stone
Width 11 m (36 ft)
History
Architect Timurtaş
Construction end 1442
Irgandı Bridge is located in Turkey
Irgandı Bridge
Irgandı Bridge
Location of Irgandı Bridge in Turkey.


Irgandı Bridge (Turkish: Irgandı Köprüsü) is an historical bridge in Bursa, Turkey. The bridge is over Gökdere, a tributary of Nilüfer River at 40°10′56″N 29°04′19″E / 40.18222°N 29.07194°E / 40.18222; 29.07194.[1] It is between Osmangazi (northwest) and Yıldırım (southeast), two second level municipalities of Greater Bursa [2]

History[edit]

The bridge was commissioned by a wealthy merchant named Müslihidddin in 1442 during the reign of Murat II of the Ottoman Empire. Its architect was probably Architect Timurtaş.[2] During the 1855 Bursa earthquake the bridge was partially damaged. During the Turkish War of Independence Bursa was occupied by the Greece. In 1922, the bridge was bombed by the retreating Greek army. It was closed to traffic. In 1949 the bridge was reconstructed by the municipality albeit with minor modifications. After 2004, following another restoration the bridge was opened to traffic.

Details[edit]

The bridge is a single arc bridge. Arch span is 16 metres (52 ft) and the width is 11 metres (36 ft).[3] It is an example of a rare type of covered bridge which houses a bazaar. ( It is claimed that there are only three other bridges in the World with shops on them which are Ponte Vecchio and Ponte Rialto in Italy and Osam Bridge in Bulgaria.) In the original design there were thirty shops on the bridge.[4] According to Ass. Prof Önge during the Ottoman times, the bridge was also used to check traffic between two neighborhoods of Bursa by closing during the nights.[3]

References[edit]