Irish budget, 2018

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2018 (2018) Irish budget
Submitted byPaschal Donohoe
Presented10 October 2017
Parliament32nd Dáil
PartyFine Gael
Websitebudget.gov.ie/Budgets/2018/2018.aspx
‹ 2017
2019 ›

The 2018 Irish budget is the Irish Government budget for the 2018 fiscal year, which was presented to Dáil Éireann on 10 October 2017 by Minister for Finance Paschal Donohoe, his first as Minister for Finance.[1][2][3]

Taoiseach Leo Varadkar said the budget is a "Budget with many authors and it was important we had something for everyone".[4]

Summary[edit]

[5][6][7]

  • €1.83 billion has been allocated to housing, with 3,800 social houses to be built by local authorities and approved housing bodies.
  • Funding for homeless services will increase by €18 million.
  • Stamp duty on commercial property transactions will rise from 2% to 6% from 11 October 2017.
  • An additional 1,300 teaching posts have been announced. 1,000 new Special Needs Assistants being recruited and an additional 800 gardaí will be recruited during 2018.
  • A reduction in prescription charges for all medical card holders under 70 from €2.50 to €2 per item.
  • A €5 per week increase in all weekly social welfare payments from end of March 2018.
  • Christmas bonus payment of 85% will be paid to all social welfare recipients.
  • 2.5% USC rate will be reduced to 2% with the ceiling for the new rate increased from €18,772 to €19,372.
  • 30 cent per litre of tax on drinks with over 8g of sugar per 100ml from April 2018.
  • The excise duty on a packet of 20 cigarettes will rise by 50 cents from 11 October 2017.
  • No changes in price to alcohol, petrol and diesel.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Four days to go: Budget 2018 negotiations are down to the wire - here is everything we know so far". Irish Independent. 6 October 2017. Retrieved 6 October 2017.
  2. ^ "#HaveYourSay: We asked if you will be better off thanks to Budget 2018 and the results are in". Irish Independent. 10 October 2017. Retrieved 11 October 2017.
  3. ^ "Donohoe doles it out, but confusion over hike to tax on property sales". Irish Independent. 10 October 2017. Retrieved 11 October 2017.
  4. ^ "'It was important we had something for everyone', says Leo as Budget 2018 looks set to bring about minimal gains for most". Irish Independent. 10 October 2017. Retrieved 11 October 2017.
  5. ^ "Budget 2018: Here are the main points you need to know". Journal. 10 October 2017. Retrieved 11 October 2017.
  6. ^ "Budget 2018: The key points". RTE News. 10 October 2017. Retrieved 11 October 2017.
  7. ^ "Budget 18 set to focus on childcare, housing and tax cuts". Irish Examiner. 10 October 2017. Retrieved 11 October 2017.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
2017
Budget of the Government of Ireland
Delivered on 10 October 2017
Succeeded by
2019