Iron Fist (TV series)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Iron Fist
Iron Fist written in black writing, the letter O written in the form of a stylized dragon.
Genre
Created byScott Buck
Based on
Starring
Composer(s)
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons2
No. of episodes23 (list of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s)
Producer(s)Evan Perazzo
Production location(s)New York City
Cinematography
  • Manuel Billeter
  • Christopher LaVasseur
Editor(s)
  • Michael N. Knue
  • Miklos Wright
  • Jonathan Chibnall
Running time49–61 minutes
Production company(s)
DistributorNetflix
Release
Original networkNetflix
Picture format
Original releaseMarch 17, 2017 (2017-03-17) – September 7, 2018 (2018-09-07)
Chronology
Preceded byMarvel's Luke Cage
Followed byMarvel's The Defenders
Related showsMarvel Cinematic Universe television series
External links
Website

Marvel's Iron Fist, or simply Iron Fist, is an American web television series created for Netflix by Scott Buck, based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name. It is set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), sharing continuity with the films of the franchise and is the fourth in a series of shows that lead to The Defenders crossover miniseries. The series is produced by Marvel Television in association with ABC Studios, with Devilina Productions and showrunner Buck for the first season. Raven Metzner took over as showrunner for the second season.

Finn Jones stars as Danny Rand / Iron Fist, a martial arts expert with the ability to call upon a mystical power known as the "Iron Fist". Jessica Henwick, Tom Pelphrey, Jessica Stroup, and Sacha Dhawan also star, with Ramón Rodríguez, Rosario Dawson and David Wenham joining them for the first season, Simone Missick and Alice Eve joining the cast for season two. After a film based on the character spent over a decade in development at Marvel Studios, development for the series began in late 2013 at Marvel Television, with Buck hired as the series showrunner in December 2015 and Jones cast as Rand in February 2016. Metzner was revealed as the series' new showrunner in July 2017. Filming for the series takes place in New York City.

All 13 episodes of the first season premiered on March 17, 2017. They received generally negative reviews from critics. Despite the critical reception, third-party data analytics determined the series had strong viewership. A second season, consisting of 10 episodes, was ordered in July 2017, and was released on September 7, 2018 to a more mixed to positive reception. On October 12, 2018, Netflix canceled the series after two seasons.

Premise[edit]

After being presumed dead for 15 years, Danny Rand returns to New York City to reclaim his family company from Harold Meachum and his children Ward Meachum and Joy Meachum. When a threat emerges, Rand must choose between his family's legacy and his duties as the Iron Fist.[1] After the events of The Defenders, Rand steps up to protect New York in Matt Murdock's absence, until a new enemy threatens Rand's identity and those he cares about.[2]

Cast and characters[edit]

  • Finn Jones as Danny Rand / Iron Fist:
    A billionaire Buddhist monk and martial artist proficient in kung-fu, with the ability to call upon the mystical power of the Iron Fist.[3][4][5] Jones described the character as "someone struggling to find his identity",[6] and identified with the character's loneliness being an orphan like Rand.[7][6] He noted that "Danny gets really stressed and really pissed off sometimes, and I understand that ... [his] optimism and where that comes from."[6] In preparation for the role, Jones studied kung fu, wushu, and tai chi, along with weight training, Buddhist philosophy, and meditation.[8] Toby Nichols portrays a young Danny Rand.[9]
  • Jessica Henwick as Colleen Wing:
    A martial artist ally of Rand who runs her own martial arts dojo called Chikara Dojo in New York City.[10] Henwick felt the most defining word for Wing was "alone", saying, "She doesn't want to be anyone's love interest and open herself up in that way."[11] Henwick also tried "to pull out that sort of very dry humor that [Wing] has, and that no bullshit New Yorker demeanor" from the comics version in her portrayal.[12]
  • Tom Pelphrey as Ward Meachum:
    The son of Harold and childhood acquaintance of Rand, whose work building up Rand Enterprises with his sister Joy is threatened to be undone with Rand's return.[13] Ward is a character from the comics, though Pelphrey noted "we're not necessarily beholden to representing him [in the series] exactly as he appears in the comic book."[14] Stroup said that Ward would experience some "male angst" on Rand's return, because "Ward would have been the one who picked on [Rand] when he was little so as pure and innocent and great as Iron Fist is, he comes in and he causes some problems" there.[15] Ilan Eskenazi portrays a teenage Ward Meachum.[16]
  • Jessica Stroup as Joy Meachum:
    The daughter of Harold and childhood acquaintance of Rand, whose work building up Rand Enterprises with her brother Ward is threatened to be undone with Rand's return.[13] Stroup said that Joy "absolutely loves" Rand, and his return to New York is "like this rebirth of what she once was, and she gets to ask these questions about herself because he's posing them to her." Stroup said that Joy would initially be unsure whether Rand is who he says he is.[15] Aimee Laurence portrays a young Joy Meachum.
  • Ramón Rodríguez as Bakuto: A leader of a faction of The Hand and Colleen Wing's sensei.[17]
  • Sacha Dhawan as Davos:
    A skilled martial artist who is the son of Lei Kung and Rand's former best friend in K'un-Lun, who grew envious when Rand became the Iron Fist. Although Dhawan first appeared in the ninth episode of the first season, Dhawan noted that the majority of Davos' storyline was intended to be explored in a potential second season.[18]
  • Rosario Dawson as Claire Temple: A former nurse from Hell's Kitchen who joins Wing's dojo. Dawson reprises her role from previous Marvel Netflix series.[19]
  • David Wenham as Harold Meachum:
    A ruthless corporate leader and co-founder of Rand Enterprises who was partners with Rand's parents at the time of their deaths.[20] Regarding Harold's relationship with his children, Joy and Ward, Wenham said the dynamic between the three of them "is complex, to say the least. It's multilayered, it’s multidimensional, it's surprising and it’s forever changing, depending on the circumstances."[14]
  • Simone Missick as Misty Knight: A Harlem NYPD Detective with a strong sense of justice, and an ally of Rand and Wing. Missick reprises her role from previous Marvel Netflix series.[21]
  • Alice Eve as "Typhoid Mary" Walker: A mysterious woman with hidden abilities.[22][23]

Episodes[edit]

Season 1 (2017)[edit]

No.
overall
No. in
season
Title [a]Directed byWritten byOriginal release date
11"Snow Gives Way"John DahlScott BuckMarch 17, 2017 (2017-03-17)
22"Shadow Hawk Takes Flight"John DahlScott BuckMarch 17, 2017 (2017-03-17)
33"Rolling Thunder Cannon Punch"Tom ShanklandQuinton PeeplesMarch 17, 2017 (2017-03-17)
44"Eight Diagram Dragon Palm"Miguel SapochnikScott ReynoldsMarch 17, 2017 (2017-03-17)
55"Under Leaf Pluck Lotus"Uta BriesewitzCristine ChambersMarch 17, 2017 (2017-03-17)
66"Immortal Emerges from Cave"RZADwain WorrellMarch 17, 2017 (2017-03-17)
77"Felling Tree with Roots"Farren BlackburnIan StokesMarch 17, 2017 (2017-03-17)
88"The Blessing of Many Fractures"Kevin TancharoenTamara Becher-WilkinsonMarch 17, 2017 (2017-03-17)
99"The Mistress of All Agonies"Jet WilkinsonPat CharlesMarch 17, 2017 (2017-03-17)
1010"Black Tiger Steals Heart"Peter HoarQuinton PeeplesMarch 17, 2017 (2017-03-17)
1111"Lead Horse Back to Stable"Deborah ChowIan StokesMarch 17, 2017 (2017-03-17)
1212"Bar the Big Boss"Andy GoddardScott ReynoldsMarch 17, 2017 (2017-03-17)
1313"Dragon Plays with Fire"Stephen SurjikScott Buck & Tamara Becher-Wilkinson & Pat CharlesMarch 17, 2017 (2017-03-17)
  1. ^ Each episode is named after Shaolin Kung Fu sequences.[24][25]

Season 2 (2018)[edit]

No.
overall
No. in
season
Title [a]Directed byWritten byOriginal release date
141"The Fury of Iron Fist"David DobkinM. Raven MetznerSeptember 7, 2018 (2018-09-07)
152"The City's Not for Burning"Rachel TalalayJon WorleySeptember 7, 2018 (2018-09-07)
163"This Deadly Secret"Toa FraserTatiana Suarez-PicoSeptember 7, 2018 (2018-09-07)
174"Target: Iron Fist"MJ BassettJenny LynnSeptember 7, 2018 (2018-09-07)
185"Heart of the Dragon"Mairzee AlmasDeclan de BarraSeptember 7, 2018 (2018-09-07)
196"The Dragon Dies at Dawn"Philip JohnMatthew WhiteSeptember 7, 2018 (2018-09-07)
207"Morning of the Mindstorm"Stephen SurjikRebecca DameronSeptember 7, 2018 (2018-09-07)
218"Citadel on the Edge of Vengeance"Julian HolmesMelissa GlennSeptember 7, 2018 (2018-09-07)
229"War Without End"Sanford BookstaverDaniel ShattuckSeptember 7, 2018 (2018-09-07)
2310"A Duel of Iron"Jonas PateM. Raven MetznerSeptember 7, 2018 (2018-09-07)
  1. ^ Each episode is named after the issue title of various comics Danny Rand has appeared in.[26][27]

Production[edit]

Development[edit]

An Iron Fist film had been in development at Marvel Studios since 2000, originally to be co-financed by Artisan Entertainment.[28] Ray Park was hired to star,[29] but the project went through multiple directors and ultimately did not come to fruition.[30][31] Development continued after Marvel Studios began to self-finance their films in the middle of the decade,[32] with Marvel hiring a group of writers to develop some of their "lesser-known properties", including Iron Fist.[33] In 2010, Rich Wilkes was hired to write a new draft for the film,[34] and by May 2013, Iron Fist was said to be one of the "projects on the horizon" for Marvel.[35]

In October 2013, Deadline Hollywood reported that Marvel Television was preparing four drama series and a miniseries, totaling 60 episodes, to present to video on demand services and cable providers, with Netflix, Amazon, and WGN America expressing interest.[36] A few weeks later, Marvel and Disney announced that Marvel Television and ABC Studios would provide Netflix with live action series centered around Iron Fist, Daredevil, Jessica Jones, and Luke Cage, leading up to a miniseries based on the Defenders.[37] In April 2015, the official title was revealed to be Marvel's Iron Fist.[38] That November, Marvel Television head and executive producer Jeph Loeb addressed unconfirmed rumors that Marvel was having a difficult time balancing Iron Fist's mystical elements in its grounded world, and that the series could be replaced with a film or a Punisher series. He explained that Marvel and Netflix deliberately held off on Iron Fist news until Marvel's Jessica Jones premiered so that series, revolving around a character largely unknown to the general audience, got the spotlight. Loeb promised that news on a showrunner would be coming,[39] and Marvel announced that Scott Buck would serve in the role a month later.[3] The series was originally intended to be the third of the announced series from Netflix, debuting after Jessica Jones, but was switched with Marvel's Luke Cage after Luke Cage became a breakout star of Jessica Jones and Marvel wanted to "follow the momentum".[40] John Dahl, Cindy Holland, Allie Goss, Alison Engel, Kris Henigman, Alan Fine, Stan Lee, Joe Quesada, Dan Buckley, Jim Chory, Loeb and Buck serve as executive producers on the series.[41] A second season was announced in July 2017,[21] with Raven Metzner announced as the new showrunner for the season, replacing Buck. Loeb felt Metzner's "love of all things Iron Fist and his extensive knowledge of martial arts films made him the perfect choice" for new showrunner.[42]

Writing[edit]

Buck stated the series would have a lighter tone to it than the previous Marvel Netflix series, given that "Danny Rand himself is a much lighter character. He's someone that has optimism and hope, and despite whatever the odds are, everything is always going to work out."[24] On first discovering Rand's powers, Buck described them as "not the greatest superpowers. All he can do is punch really hard ... you can use it in some ways but in rest of his life, it’s not really all that significant. His greatest gift is his martial arts skills, and that’s something he suffered and worked for."[43] The writers and producers approached "scientists to discuss how someone could potentially have that type of super strength in the real world."[44] Loeb described the series as "Marvel’s foray into martial arts films", and Buck stated that the comics were just "a starting-off point" for the series, which would be "very grounded [and] character driven".[7] Jones felt the series was "actually a feminist television show" calling the female characters "incredibly strong, incredibly unique, and they really hold the men up in that world... All the men in our show are falling apart. They need these women to hold them up".[12]

Each episode of the first season is named after Shaolin Kung Fu sequences,[24][25] while each episode title in the second season is named after the issue title of various comics Danny Rand has appeared in.[26][27]

Casting[edit]

Casting for Iron Fist began by November 2015,[45] with Finn Jones being cast as Danny Rand / Iron Fist in February 2016,[4] but not officially confirmed by Marvel until March.[5] On casting Jones, Buck said, "we saw him and I think we all just knew immediately this is our guy... He just seemed to be able to display [the character's youthful optimism and badass attitude] when needed and sometimes all at once, so he was very capable and flexible as he brought the character to life."[45] By April, Jessica Henwick, David Wenham, Jessica Stroup and Tom Pelphrey were cast as Colleen Wing,[10] Harold Meachum,[20] Joy Meachum, and Ward Meachum, respectively,[13] and by June, Sacha Dhawan had been cast as Davos, though he was not revealed to be in the role until March 2017.[18] In October 2016, it was revealed that Rosario Dawson would reprise her role of Claire Temple from previous Marvel/Netflix series.[19] Ramón Rodríguez also stars as Bakuto.[17]

Jones, Henwick, Pelphrey, Stroup, and Dhawan reprise their roles in the second season.[22] They are joined by Simone Missick as Misty Knight, reprising her role from previous Marvel Netflix series,[21] and Alice Eve as Mary Walker.[22][23]

Design[edit]

Stephanie Maslansky is the costume designer for Iron Fist, after serving the same role for the previous Marvel Netflix series.[46] Maslansky noted one of the differences in the series compared to the other Marvel Netflix series was the neighborhoods it spent time in ("the wealthier neighborhoods; Midtown, Upper East Side, that sort of thing") compared to Hell's Kitchen for Daredevil and Jessica Jones and Harlem for Luke Cage. As such, Rand wears more suits than the other heroes, and given the amount of fighting he does in the series, a lot of spandex was added to increase the suits' flexibility.[47] The monk costumes and Rand's warrior costume was based on "real Shaolin warrior monk costumes... I took that distinctive silhouette from the Shaolin warrior monk clothing, and we combined it with the traditional colors of the Iron Fist, green and gold."[48] The series opening title sequence was created by Elastic.[49]

Filming[edit]

Filming for the series takes place in New York City,[50] in addition to sound stage work.[51] Manuel Billeter served as director of photography for the first season, after doing the same for seasons of Jessica Jones and Luke Cage,[52] and Brett Chan was the series' stunt-coordinator and second unit director in the first season.[24][53] The first season was filmed in high dynamic range (HDR), which Billeter stated added "a learning curve" to his work, forcing him to rethink how he would shoot certain scenes.[44] For the second season, Niels Alpert served as director of photography,[54] while Clayton Barber took over as the fight coordinator.[55]

Music[edit]

In late October 2016, Trevor Morris was revealed to be composing the music for the first season.[56] A soundtrack album featuring Morris's score for the first season was released by Marvel digitally on March 17, 2017, coinciding with the release of the season.[57] Robert Lydecker composed the score for the second season.[58]

Marvel Cinematic Universe tie-ins[edit]

Iron Fist is the fourth of the ordered Netflix series, after Marvel's Daredevil, Jessica Jones and Luke Cage, which lead to the miniseries, The Defenders.[40][59][60] In November 2013, Disney CEO Bob Iger stated that if the characters prove popular on Netflix, "It’s quite possible that they could become feature films,"[61] which Sarandos echoed in July 2015.[62] In August 2014, Vincent D'Onofrio, Wilson Fisk in Daredevil, stated that after the "series stuff with Netflix", Marvel has "a bigger plan to branch out".[63] In March 2015, Loeb spoke on the ability for the series to crossover with the MCU films and the ABC television series, saying, "It all exists in the same universe. As it is now, in the same way that our films started out as self-contained and then by the time we got to The Avengers, it became more practical for Captain America to do a little crossover into Thor 2 and for Bruce Banner to appear at the end of Iron Man 3. We have to earn that. The audience needs to understand who all of these characters are and what the world is before you then start co-mingling in terms of where it's going."[64]

Release[edit]

Season Episodes Original release DVD release dates Blu-ray release dates
Region 1 Region 2 Region 4 Region A Region B Region C
1 13 March 17, 2017 (2017-03-17) TBA June 4, 2018[65] May 30, 2018[66] TBA January 1, 2018[67] May 30, 2018[68]
2 10 September 7, 2018 (2018-09-07) TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

Iron Fist is available on the streaming service Netflix, in all territories where it is available,[1] in Ultra HD 4K and HDR.[69] The episodes for each season were released simultaneously, as opposed to a serialized format, to encourage binge-watching, a format which has been successful for other Netflix original series.[50][51]

Marketing[edit]

Disney Consumer Products created a small line of products to cater to a more adult audience, given the show’s edgier tone. Paul Gitter, senior VP of Marvel Licensing for Disney Consumer Products explained that the focus would be more on teens and adults than very young people, with products at outlets like Hot Topic. Additionally, a Marvel Knights merchandise program was created to support the series, which creates new opportunities for individual product lines and collector focused products. Licensing partners wanted to pair up with Marvel, despite this not being a film project, given its previous successes.[70]

Reception[edit]

Audience viewership[edit]

As Netflix does not reveal subscriber viewership numbers for any of their original series, Karim Zreik, senior vice president of original programming at Marvel Television, provided some viewership demographics for Iron Fist in August 2017, noting that the series has attracted mainly younger viewers.[71] Also in the month, Netflix released viewing patterns for the Marvel Netflix series. The data, which came from Netflix's "1,300 'taste communities' around the world, where subscribers are grouped based on what they watch", showed that viewers would not watch the series in chronological order by release, rather starting with Jessica Jones, then Daredevil, Luke Cage and finally Iron Fist. Todd Yellin, Netflix’s vice president of product innovation, noted that audiences watch the series "in order of how they're interested in them and how they learn about them." Netflix's data also showed that a viewer watching Luke Cage would most often then move on to Iron Fist, while other series with "coming-of-tales" such as 13 Reasons Why, Love and The 100 led viewers to starting Iron Fist.[72] In October 2018, Crimson Hexagon, a consumer insights company, released data that examined the "social-media buzz" for the series to try to correlate it with potential viewership. The data showed that when the first season premiered in March 2017, the season had over 120,000 Twitter and Instagram posts regarding it, and when the second season was released in September 2018, the posts had declined dramatically to under 20,000.[73]

Critical response[edit]

Season Critical response
Rotten Tomatoes Metacritic
1 19% (72 reviews)[74] 37 (21 reviews)[75]
2 54% (39 reviews)[76] 39 (6 reviews)[77]

The review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes reported the first season has a 19% approval rating, based on 72 reviews, with an average rating of 4.2/10. The website's critical consensus reads, "Despite some promising moments, Iron Fist is weighed down by an absence of momentum and originality."[74] Metacritic, which uses a weighted average, assigned a score of 37 out of 100 based on reviews from 21 critics, indicating "generally unfavorable reviews".[75]

For the second season Rotten Tomatoes reported a 54% approval rating, based on 39 reviews, with an average rating of 5.17/10. The website's critical consensus reads, "Better action scenes and tighter pacing elevate Iron Fist's second season, but it remains a lesser light among MCU shows."[76] On September 7, 2018, Rotten Tomatoes announced that Iron Fist had the largest increase in approval ratings between the first and second season, increasing 33% at the time.[78] Metacritic assigned a score of 39 out of 100 based on reviews from six critics, indicating "generally unfavorable reviews".[77]

Accolades[edit]

Iron Fist was nominated in the category of Best New Media Superhero Series at the 44th Saturn Awards.[79]

Cancellation and future[edit]

On October 12, 2018, Netflix canceled the series, despite Marvel wanting to have the series continue on the platform.[80] Marvel said the characters from the series would "live on" despite the cancellation, and continue to appear in the MCU.[80][81] Deadline Hollywood also reported that Disney was considering reviving the series on its streaming service.[80]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gallaway, Lauren (October 4, 2016). "Marvel's Iron Fist Announces Release Date". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on October 4, 2016. Retrieved October 4, 2016.
  2. ^ Alexander, Julia (July 19, 2018). "Netflix's Iron Fist Season 2 premieres in September". Polygon. Archived from the original on July 20, 2018. Retrieved July 20, 2018.
  3. ^ a b Strom, Marc (December 7, 2015). "Scott Buck to Showrun the Netflix Original Series 'Marvel's Iron Fist'". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on December 7, 2015. Retrieved December 7, 2015.
  4. ^ a b Hibberd, James (February 25, 2016). "Game of Thrones actor Finn Jones to play Iron Fist". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on February 25, 2016. Retrieved February 25, 2016.
  5. ^ a b Strom, Marc (March 17, 2016). "Finn Jones to Star in the Netflix Original Series 'Marvel's Iron Fist'". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on March 17, 2016. Retrieved March 17, 2016.
  6. ^ a b c Li, Shirley (January 16, 2017). "The Defenders: Finn Jones previews Iron Fist, Danny's team-building role". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on January 16, 2017. Retrieved January 16, 2017.
  7. ^ a b Douglas, Edward (October 8, 2016). "How 'Iron Fist' Will Differ from Fellow Marvel/Netflix Shows and the Comics". Collider. Archived from the original on October 9, 2016. Retrieved October 9, 2016.
  8. ^ Hibberd, James (April 12, 2016). "Finn Jones talks playing Marvel's Iron Fist (his training is insane)". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on April 12, 2016. Retrieved April 12, 2016.
  9. ^ Randall, Kayla (November 2016). "Two young Louisiana actors are featured in two buzzed-about Netflix shows". 225 Baton Rouge. Archived from the original on March 6, 2017. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  10. ^ a b Hibberd, James (April 1, 2016). "Marvel's Iron Fist casts The Force Awakens actress in lead role". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on April 1, 2016. Retrieved April 1, 2016.
  11. ^ Lacava, Stephanie (February 14, 2017). "Jessica Henwick". Interview. Archived from the original on February 15, 2017. Retrieved February 15, 2017.
  12. ^ a b Page, Aubrey (February 24, 2017). "'Iron Fist': Finn Jones and Jessica Henwick on Comic Influences & "Inspecting" Racial Stereotypes". Collider. Archived from the original on February 24, 2017. Retrieved February 24, 2017.
  13. ^ a b c Wagmeister, Elizabeth (April 18, 2016). "'90210' Alum Jessica Stroup, Tom Pelphrey Join Netflix's 'Marvel's Iron Fist' (Exclusive)". Variety. Archived from the original on April 18, 2016. Retrieved April 18, 2016.
  14. ^ a b Damore, Meagan (October 16, 2016). "Iron Fist's Wenham, Stroup & More Reveal New Details About The Meachums". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on October 18, 2016.
  15. ^ a b Finn Jones on Becoming Iron Fist - NYCC 2016. IGN. October 8, 2016. Retrieved October 11, 2016.
  16. ^ Hornshaw, Phil; Owen, Phil (March 18, 2017). "31 'Iron Fist' Characters, Ranked Worst to Best (Photos)". Yahoo!. Archived from the original on March 25, 2017. Retrieved March 25, 2017.
  17. ^ a b Polo, Susana (March 20, 2017). "Who the heck is Iron Fist's Bakuto?". Polygon. Archived from the original on March 25, 2017. Retrieved March 25, 2017.
  18. ^ a b Fullerton, Huw (March 17, 2017). "Meet the major villain Marvel's Iron Fist has been keeping a secret – and the Sherlock actor who's playing him". Radio Times. Archived from the original on March 25, 2017. Retrieved March 25, 2017.
  19. ^ a b Damore, Meagan (October 8, 2016). "NYCC: Iron Fist Cast Makes First-Ever Live Appearance". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on October 9, 2016. Retrieved October 9, 2016.
  20. ^ a b "David Wenham Cast in Netflix Original Series 'Marvel's Iron Fist'". Marvel.com. April 11, 2016. Archived from the original on April 11, 2016. Retrieved April 11, 2016.
  21. ^ a b c Otterson, Joe (July 21, 2017). "'Iron Fist' Renewed for Season 2 at Netflix". Variety. Archived from the original on July 21, 2017. Retrieved July 21, 2017.
  22. ^ a b c Otterson, Joe (December 5, 2017). "'Iron Fist' Season 2 Adds 'Star Trek' Alum Alice Eve (Exclusive)". Variety. Archived from the original on December 6, 2017. Retrieved December 6, 2017.
  23. ^ a b Shaw-Williams, Hannah (July 19, 2018). "Iron Fist Season 2: Alice Eve Confirmed As Typhoid Mary". Screen Rant. Archived from the original on July 19, 2018. Retrieved July 19, 2018.
  24. ^ a b c d Iron Fist Will Bring a Lighter Tone to the Marvel / Netflix Series - NYCC 2016. IGN. October 8, 2016. Retrieved October 10, 2016.
  25. ^ a b Golder, Dave (January 23, 2017). "Iron Fist Episode Titles Inspired By Shaolin Kung Fu Moves". Mym Buzz. Archived from the original on September 28, 2017. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  26. ^ a b Bundel, Ani (July 26, 2018). "The 'Iron Fist' Season 2 Episode Titles Will Be Tweeted Out One At A Time". Elite Daily. Retrieved July 26, 2018.
  27. ^ a b Barnhardt, Adam (July 24, 2018). "'Iron Fist' Twitter Feed Teases Season 2 Episode Titles". Comicbook.com. Retrieved July 26, 2018.
  28. ^ Fleming, Michael (May 16, 2000). "Artisan deal a real Marvel". Variety. Archived from the original on August 18, 2016. Retrieved August 18, 2016.
  29. ^ Harris, Dana (January 3, 2001). "Park, Turman Marvel at Fist". Variety. Archived from the original on August 19, 2016. Retrieved August 18, 2016.
  30. ^ Harris, Dana (July 26, 2001). "Wong to forge Marvel's Iron". Variety. Archived from the original on August 19, 2016. Retrieved August 18, 2016.
  31. ^ Topel, Fred (March 29, 2007). "Steve Carr Waits In Marvel Queue for Iron Fist Production". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on August 19, 2016. Retrieved August 18, 2016.
  32. ^ Vincent, Roger (September 6, 2005). "Marvel to Make Movies Based on Comic Books". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on April 16, 2014. Retrieved April 12, 2011.
  33. ^ Graser, Marc (March 26, 2009). "Marvel's hiring writers". Variety. Archived from the original on August 18, 2016. Retrieved August 18, 2016.
  34. ^ Fleming, Jr., Mike (August 25, 2010). "Marvel Forges 'Iron Fist' Deal With 'xXx' Creator Rich Wilkes". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on April 15, 2014. Retrieved February 21, 2014.
  35. ^ Kit, Borys; Bond, Paul (May 7, 2013). "Marvel Cliffhanger: Robert Downey Jr.'s $50 Million Sequel Showdown". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on March 10, 2014. Retrieved May 8, 2013.
  36. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (October 14, 2013). "Marvel Preps 60-Episode Package Of Four Series & A Mini For VOD & Cable Networks". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on October 15, 2013. Retrieved October 14, 2013.
  37. ^ Lieberman, David (November 7, 2013). "Disney To Provide Netflix With Four Series Based On Marvel Characters". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on April 8, 2014. Retrieved November 7, 2013.
  38. ^ Cavanaugh, Patrick (April 21, 2015). "Netflix Orders a Second Season of 'Marvel's Daredevil'". Marvel.com. Archived from the original on April 22, 2015. Retrieved April 21, 2015.
  39. ^ Ching, Albert (November 20, 2015). "Jeph Loeb Says There's 'Never Been Any Change' On "Iron Fist"". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on November 21, 2015. Retrieved November 21, 2015.
  40. ^ a b Walzer, Graham (September 27, 2016). "Mike Colter, Luke Cage, and the "Wu-Tang-ification" of the Marvel Universe". Complex. Archived from the original on September 28, 2016. Retrieved September 28, 2016.
  41. ^ Ryan, Maureen (March 8, 2017). "TV Review: 'Marvel's Iron Fist' on Netflix". Variety. Archived from the original on March 9, 2017. Retrieved March 8, 2017.
  42. ^ Hibberd, James (July 22, 2017). "Iron Fist changing showrunners for season 2". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on July 22, 2017. Retrieved July 22, 2017.
  43. ^ Arora, Akhil (December 7, 2016). "'Danny Rand Is No White Saviour,' Says Marvel's Iron Fist Showrunner". Gadgets 360. Archived from the original on December 8, 2016. Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  44. ^ a b Kelly, Samantha Murphy (December 7, 2016). "Why Netflix's Iron Fist will look different than anything else on TV". CNNMoney. Archived from the original on December 7, 2016. Retrieved December 7, 2016.
  45. ^ a b Damore, Meagan (October 15, 2016). "Iron Fist EP Explains Why Finn Jones Is Perfect For Danny Rand". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on October 15, 2016. Retrieved October 15, 2016.
  46. ^ Christian, Scott (September 30, 2016). "Luke Cage's Costume Designer Reveals Why Heroes Love Hoodies". Esquire. Archived from the original on October 14, 2016. Retrieved October 14, 2016.
  47. ^ Di Placido, Dani (March 6, 2017). "Marvel's 'Iron Fist' Costume Designer Talks Corporate Suits And Monk Robes". Forbes. Archived from the original on March 8, 2017. Retrieved March 8, 2017.
  48. ^ Di Placido, Dani (March 6, 2017). "Marvel's 'Iron Fist' Costume Designer Talks Corporate Suits And Monk Robes - Page 3". Forbes. Archived from the original on March 8, 2017. Retrieved March 8, 2017.
  49. ^ Romano, Nick (August 24, 2017). "The One Thing Game of Thrones, Westworld, and The Crown Have in Common". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on August 28, 2017. Retrieved August 28, 2017.
  50. ^ a b "Marvel's Netflix Series to Film in New York City". Marvel.com. February 26, 2014. Archived from the original on February 26, 2014. Retrieved February 26, 2014.
  51. ^ a b Blackmon, Joe (April 27, 2014). "Marvel Netflix Series Part Of Marvel Cinematic Universe, Available For Binge Watching According To Joe Quesada". ComicBook.com. Archived from the original on April 28, 2014. Retrieved April 28, 2014.
  52. ^ "10 Cinematographers to Watch 2016: Manuel Billeter". Variety. April 20, 2016. Archived from the original on April 30, 2016. Retrieved April 30, 2016.
  53. ^ "Brett Chan 2nd Unit Director on Ironfist". Brett Chan Stunts. Archived from the original on October 10, 2016. Retrieved October 10, 2016.
  54. ^ Damore, Meagan (August 17, 2018). "Iron Fist's S2 Crusade Will Bring New Challenges, Make Him More Relatable". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on August 18, 2018. Retrieved August 18, 2018.
  55. ^ Barnhardt, Adam (July 19, 2018). "'Iron Fist' Hires 'Black Panther' Fight Coordinator". ComicBook.com. Archived from the original on July 21, 2018. Retrieved July 21, 2018.
  56. ^ "Trevor Morris to Score Marvel's Netflix Series 'Iron Fist'". Film Music Reporter. October 27, 2016. Archived from the original on October 27, 2016.
  57. ^ "Soundtrack for Marvel's 'Iron Fist' to Be Released". Film Music Reporter. March 16, 2017. Archived from the original on March 20, 2017. Retrieved March 20, 2017.
  58. ^ "Alumnus Robert Lydecker scores second season of "Iron Fist"". USC Thornton School of Music. September 11, 2018. Archived from the original on October 4, 2018. Retrieved October 4, 2018.
  59. ^ "Marvel TV head: 'Daredevil' starts shooting in July, 'Jessica Jones' next up". HitFix. March 24, 2014. Archived from the original on March 25, 2014. Retrieved March 25, 2014.
  60. ^ White, Brett (March 31, 2015). "Marvel Names "Southland" Producer Hodari Coker As "Luke Cage" Showrunner". Comic Book Resources. Archived from the original on April 1, 2015. Retrieved April 1, 2015.
  61. ^ Graser, Marc (November 7, 2013). "Why Disney Chose to Put Marvel's New TV Shows on Netflix". Variety. Archived from the original on February 20, 2014. Retrieved February 20, 2014.
  62. ^ Goldman, Eric (July 28, 2015). "Netflix On Marvel Series Release Plan And If Punisher Could Get A Spinoff". IGN. Archived from the original on July 28, 2015. Retrieved July 28, 2015.
  63. ^ Romano, Nick. "Exclusive: 'Daredevil' Star Vincent D'Onofrio Talks Kingpin, Marvel Fans and 'Defenders' Crossover". ScreenCrush. Archived from the original on August 25, 2014. Retrieved August 25, 2014.
  64. ^ Tanswell, Adam (March 4, 2015). "Marvel's Head of TV talks Agents of SHIELD, Inhumans and Netflix". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on March 8, 2015. Retrieved March 7, 2015.
  65. ^ Palmer, Roger. "Iron Fist Season 1 Coming Soon To DVD & Blu Ray | | DisKingdom.com | Disney | Marvel | Star Wars - Toys, Merchandise, Collectibles, Entertainment & Theme Parks News". DisKingdom. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  66. ^ "Iron Fist - Season 1 4 DVD | JB Hi-Fi". JB Hi-Fi. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  67. ^ "Marvel's Iron Fist steelbook Season 1 Steelbook Uk (iron fist steelbook) Exclusive Limited Edition Steelbook Blu-ray Region Free". Amazon.co.uk. Retrieved October 22, 2018.
  68. ^ "Iron Fist - Season 1 4 Blu-ray | JB Hi-Fi". JB Hi-Fi. Retrieved July 29, 2018.
  69. ^ "Marvel's Iron Fist". Netflix. Archived from the original on September 7, 2016. Retrieved September 7, 2016.
  70. ^ Graser, Marc (March 11, 2015). "Marvel's Merchandise Plan for 'Avengers: Age of Ultron:' 'Make the Big Bigger'". Variety. Archived from the original on March 12, 2015. Retrieved March 11, 2015.
  71. ^ Ritman, Alex; Szalai, Georg (August 24, 2017). "Edinburgh TV Fest: Marvel Exec Hints at Comedic Direction, Teases 'Inhumans'". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on August 24, 2017. Retrieved August 24, 2017.
  72. ^ Truitt, Brian (August 22, 2017). "You won't believe what shows lead viewers to watch Netflix's Marvel series". USA Today. Archived from the original on August 24, 2017. Retrieved August 24, 2017.
  73. ^ Clark, Travis (October 27, 2018). "Interest in Netflix's 'Luke Cage' and 'Iron Fist' dropped dramatically over time, and its other Marvel shows could also be in trouble". Business Insider. Archived from the original on November 1, 2018. Retrieved November 1, 2018.
  74. ^ a b "Marvel's Iron Fist: Season 1 (2017)". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango. Retrieved May 22, 2018.
  75. ^ a b "Marvel's Iron Fist: Season 1". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved March 23, 2017.
  76. ^ a b "Marvel's Iron Fist: Season 2 (2018)". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango. Retrieved October 17, 2018.
  77. ^ a b "Marvel's Iron Fist: Season 2". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved September 7, 2018.
  78. ^ Topel, Fred (September 7, 2018). "Marvel's Iron Fist Breaks Tomatometer Record with Biggest Sophomore Bump". Rotten Tomatoes. Fandango. Archived from the original on October 4, 2018. Retrieved September 7, 2018.
  79. ^ McNary, Dave (March 15, 2018). "'Black Panther,' 'Walking Dead' Rule Saturn Awards Nominations". Variety. Archived from the original on March 15, 2018. Retrieved March 15, 2018.
  80. ^ a b c Patten, Dominic (October 12, 2018). "Netflix Knocks Out 'Marvel's Iron Fist', No Season 3 For Martial Arts Series". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on October 13, 2018. Retrieved October 13, 2018.
  81. ^ Romano, Nick (October 13, 2018). "Finn Jones responds to Iron Fist cancellation: 'With every end is a new beginning'". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on October 18, 2018. Retrieved October 18, 2018.

External links[edit]