Jim Gilmore presidential campaign, 2016

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Gilmore for America
Gilmore 2016.png
CampaignU.S. presidential election, 2016
CandidateJim Gilmore
68th Governor of Virginia
(1998–2002)
AffiliationRepublican Party
StatusAnnounced: July 30, 2015
Suspended: February 12, 2016
HeadquartersPO Box 29322
Henrico, Virginia
ReceiptsUS$214,440 (December 31, 2015[1])
Website
www.GilmoreforAmerica.com

The 2016 presidential campaign of Jim Gilmore, the 68th Governor of Virginia, was officially launched on July 30, 2015, when Gilmore filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) and announced his candidacy through a variety of news outlets.[2] Gilmore suspended his campaign on February 12, 2016, after failing to qualify for inclusion in the Republican primary debates.[3]

Background[edit]

Gilmore, who served as Governor of Virginia from 1998 to 2002 and chair of the Republican National Committee from January to December 2001, made an unsuccessful bid for the Republican presidential nomination in the 2008 election cycle. Gilmore later ran for the U.S Senate seat being vacated by Republican John Warner. He faced Democratic fellow former Governor Mark Warner, who was Gilmore's successor as governor in 2002, and lost the election by a large margin.

Campaign[edit]

Gilmore campaigning

Gilmore formally announced his candidacy for the 2016 Republican Party (GOP) presidential nomination via an internet video clip on July 30, 2015,[2] a day after filing as a candidate with the FEC.[4] The same evening, he appeared on Special Report with Bret Baier as the "center seat" where panelists Charles Krauthammer, Julie Pace, and Steve Hayes questioned him on a variety of issues.[5]

Gilmore was consistently the lowest-polling candidate in the 2016 GOP field.[citation needed] He rarely registered more than 1% in a national poll, often polling at 0%, and sometimes was not offered as a choice. This resulted in his polling at 0.0% in the Huffington Post aggregate poll,[6] and lack of showings in the earlier Real Clear Politics aggregate poll.[7] Gilmore failed to qualify for all but two of the "undercard" lower-tier debates. He was the only commonly polled candidate to be left out of more than one undercard debate.[8] Gilmore insisted that he was "not going anywhere" and would continue to run.[9]

On January 26, 2016, after being denied participation in five consecutive debates, Gilmore was invited back for the "undercard" debate on January 28, his first debate since August. This was the last debate before the Iowa caucuses. The "undercard" debates were discontinued after the Iowa Caucuses.[10]

After 12 residents of Iowa caucused for Gilmore and he received 133 votes in the New Hampshire primary,[11][12][13][14] he said he intended to continue his campaign into South Carolina.[15] However, Gilmore suspended his campaign a week before that primary, on February 12, 2016.[16]

Endorsements[edit]

Jim Gilmore endorsements
All
  • New Hampshire State Senator: Sam Cataldo[17]
  • Radio Personality: Jeff Fisher, Mercury Radio Arts

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Candidate (P80003379) Summary Reports – 2016 Cycle". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved October 16, 2015.
  2. ^ a b Allen, Cooper (July 30, 2015). "Jim Gilmore formally joins GOP presidential race". USA Today. Retrieved July 30, 2015.
  3. ^ "Jim Gilmore suspends campaign". Politico. Retrieved February 12, 2016.
  4. ^ Richinick, Michele (July 30, 2015). "Jim Gilmore Is GOP's 17th Presidential Candidate". Newsweek. Retrieved July 30, 2015.
  5. ^ "Special Report". www.foxnews.com. Fox News. Retrieved 2015-07-30.
  6. ^ "2016 National Republican Primary – Polls – HuffPost Pollster". Huffington Post.
  7. ^ "2016 Republican Presidential Nomination". Retrieved September 20, 2015.
  8. ^ "Gilmore campaign not concerned, despite not yet qualifying for next GOP debate". Fox News.
  9. ^ "Jim Gilmore: Alive and Kicking". Bearing Drift.com.
  10. ^ "Fox News announces GOP debate candidate lineup". Fox News. January 26, 2016. Archived from the original on January 27, 2016. Retrieved January 26, 2016.
  11. ^ White, Daniel (11 February 2016). "Finishing Last: A Day in the Life of Presidential Candidate Jim Gilmore". Time. Retrieved 30 August 2016.
  12. ^ "Republican Jim Gilmore only got 12 votes in Iowa". The Week. 2 February 2016. Retrieved 2 February 2016.
  13. ^ Estepa, Jessica (February 2, 2016). "#Gilmentum means 12 Iowa caucus-goers for Jim Gilmore". USA TODAY. Retrieved February 2, 2016.
  14. ^ Bartel, Bill (February 4, 2016). "Former Virginia Gov. Jim Gilmore not giving up longshot presidential bid". The Virginian-Pilot. Norfolk, Virginia. Retrieved February 6, 2016.
  15. ^ Glum, Julia (February 9, 2016). "After New Hampshire Primary, Who's Still Running For President?". International Business Times. Retrieved February 11, 2016.
  16. ^ Allen, Cooper (February 12, 2016). "Jim Gilmore drops out of GOP presidential race". USA Today.com. Retrieved February 12, 2016.
  17. ^ "Jim Gilmore Names State Senator Sam Cataldo Head of his New Hampshire Campaign". Blog.4president.org. October 16, 2015.