Jock Hartley

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Jock Hartley
Lt Col J Hartley.gif
Personal information
Full nameJohn Cabourn Hartley
Born(1874-11-15)November 15, 1874
Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England
DiedMarch 8, 1963(1963-03-08) (aged 88)
Woodhall Spa, Lincolnshire, England
BattingRight-handed
BowlingLeg-break
International information
National side
Career statistics
Competition Tests FC
Matches 2 84
Runs scored 15 1,380
Batting average 3.75 12.89
100s/50s 0/0 0/2
Top score 9 84*
Balls bowled 192 10,489
Wickets 1 227
Bowling average 115.00 25.40
5 wickets in innings 0 12
10 wickets in match 0 4
Best bowling 1/62 8/161
Catches/stumpings 2/0 53/0
Source: CricketArchive, 1 July 2017

Colonel John Cabourn Hartley DSO (15 November 1874 – 8 March 1963), known as Jock Hartley, was an English first-class cricketer and British Army officer.[1]

Cricket career[edit]

Hartley was educated at Tonbridge School and Brasenose College, Oxford,[2] he played first-class cricket for Oxford University from 1895 to 1897 and Sussex from 1895 to 1898. He then went on to play for Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) in first-class fixtures until the 1926 season, he was vice-captain of the MCC team in New Zealand in 1922-23, but captained most of the matches owing to an injury to the captain, Archie MacLaren.[3]

Hartley played two Test matches for England on their tour to South Africa in 1905-06, but with little success.[1]

His best first-class bowling figures were 8 for 161 for Oxford University in the first innings in Oxford's victory over Cambridge University in 1896, he also took 3 for 78 in the second innings and top-scored with 43 in Oxford's first innings.[4] He made his highest score of 84 not out at the age of 50 when he captained MCC in a match against Wales in 1925.[5]

Military career[edit]

In the Army, Hartley served with the Royal Fusiliers in both the Second Boer War and the First World War, being wounded twice and mentioned in dispatches four times,[2] he was awarded the DSO in the 1919 New Year Honours.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Jock Hartley at CricketArchive
  2. ^ a b "Colonel J.C. Hartley". The Times. London. 9 March 1963. p. 10.
  3. ^ Don Neely & Richard Payne, Men in White: The History of New Zealand International Cricket, 1894–1985, Moa, Auckland, 1986, pp. 61–64.
  4. ^ "Oxford University v Cambridge University 1896". CricketArchive. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  5. ^ "MCC v Wales 1925". CricketArchive. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  6. ^ "No. 31092". The London Gazette (Supplement). 31 December 1918. p. 19.

External links[edit]