John McClintock (Royal Navy officer)

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John McClintock
Born 26 July 1874
Died 23 March 1929 (1929-03-24) (aged 54)
Allegiance United Kingdom United Kingdom
Service/branch Naval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg Royal Navy
Years of service 1887–1929
Rank Vice Admiral
Commands held HMS Lord Nelson
HMS Dreadnought
HMS King George V
3rd Light Cruiser Squadron
Royal Naval College, Greenwich
Battles/wars World War I
Awards Companion of the Order of the Bath
Distinguished Service Order

Vice-Admiral John William Leopold McClintock, CB, DSO (26 July 1874 – 23 March 1929) was a Royal Navy who became President of the Royal Naval College, Greenwich.

Naval career[edit]

Born the son of Admiral Sir Francis Leopold McClintock, McClintock joined the Royal Navy in 1887. He held the rank of lieutenant when in June 1902 he was posted to serve as first and gunnery (G) lieutenant on the protected cruiser HMS Andromeda, flag ship of the Cruiser division of the Mediterranean Fleet.[1]

He served in World War I, during which he commanded the battleship HMS Lord Nelson at the Gallipoli landings and, then from July 1916, commanded the battleship HMS Dreadnought followed by, from December 1916, the battleship HMS King George V.[2] He became Commodore at the Royal Navy Barracks at Portsmouth in 1920, Director of Naval Artillery and Torpedo at the Admiralty in 1919 and Director of the Mobilisation Department at the Admiralty in 1923.[2] He went on to be Commander of the 3rd Light Cruiser Squadron in 1924 and President of the Royal Naval College, Greenwich early in 1929 before his death a few months later.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Naval & Military intelligence". The Times (36804). London. 26 June 1902. p. 9. 
  2. ^ a b Liddell Hart Centre for Military Archives
  3. ^ Royal Navy Senior Appointments Archived 15 March 2012 at the Wayback Machine. at gulabin.com, accessed 9 October 2013
Military offices
Preceded by
Sir Richard Webb
President, Royal Naval College, Greenwich
1929
Succeeded by
Sir William Boyle