Jonathan M. Gregory

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Jonathan Gregory

Jonathan Gregory Royal Society.jpg
Jonathan Gregory at the Royal Society admissions day in London, July 2018
Born
Jonathan Michael Gregory

EducationStanborough School
Alma materUniversity of Oxford (BA)
University of Birmingham (PhD)
AwardsBBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award (2018)
Scientific career
FieldsClimate change
Sea level change
Climate sensitivity[2]
InstitutionsMet Office
University of Reading
Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research
University of East Anglia[1]
ThesisThe VA1 trigger processor and a study of jet production (1990)
Websitemetoffice.gov.uk/research/people/jonathan-gregory

Jonathan Michael Gregory FRS is a climate modeller working on mechanisms of global and large-scale change in climate and sea level on multidecadal and longer timescales[3][4] and the Met Office and the University of Reading.[5][2]

Education[edit]

Gregory was educated at Stanborough School, Welwyn Garden City[citation needed] and the University of Oxford.[5] He completed his postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham where he was awarded a Doctor of Philosophy degree in experimental particle physics in 1990[6] for work on the UA1 experiment at CERN.[1]

Career and Research[edit]

Gregory is currently[when?] a senior scientist in the Climate Division of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) National Centre for Atmospheric Science (NCAS-Climate), located in the Department of Meteorology at the University of Reading; and a research fellow in climate change at the Met Office Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research.[7]

A 2004 study, led by Gregory and published in the journal Nature,[8] predicted that the Greenland ice sheet is likely to be eliminated as a consequence of global warming, resulting in a rise in global sea-levels by 7.1 meters over the next 1000 years or more.[9]

He was a co-ordinating Lead Author of the 2001 IPCC Third Assessment Report chapter 11 Changes in Sea Level[10], and a contributing author to the sea level chapter in the IPCC Second Assessment Report".[11] Gregory was also a co-Lead Author of the 2007 IPCC Fourth Assessment Report chapter 5 Observations: Oceanic Climate Change and Sea Level,[12] and chapter 10 Global Climate Projections.[13]

Selected publications[edit]

Gregory's research collaborators include Tom Wigley,[5] Phil Jones John Mitchell, his publications[3] include:

  • Coastal and global averaged sea level rise for 1950 to 2000[14]
  • On the consistent scaling of terms in the sea ice dynamics equation[15]
  • Simulated and observed decadal variability in ocean heat content[16]
  • Threatened loss of the Greenland ice-sheet[8]
  • The role of the Atlantic freshwater balance in the hyteresis of the meridional overturning circulation[17]
  • An observationally based estimate of the climate sensitivity[18]
  • Church, J. A. and J. M. Gregory, 2001. Sea level change In: Encyclopedia of Ocean Sciences. J. H. Steele and K. K. Turekian eds. Academic Press, London[19]
  • Comparison of results from several AOGCMs for global and regional sea-level change 1900-2100[20]

Awards and honours[edit]

In 2010 Gregory was awarded an Advanced Grant by the European Research Council (ERC) to carry out research on sea level change.[21][22] . In 2017 Jonathan Gregory was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS);[23] the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize was shared by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and Al Gore for their work on climate change.[24]

He has received the 2018 BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in the category of Climate Change, jointly with Anny Cazenave and John A. Church for their outstanding contributions, the committee states, “to detecting, understanding and projecting the response of global and regional sea level to anthropogenic climate change.”[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Gregory, Jonathan (2017). "About me". met.rdg.ac.uk.
  2. ^ a b Jonathan M. Gregory publications indexed by Google Scholar Edit this at Wikidata
  3. ^ a b Jonathan M. Gregory publications indexed by the Scopus bibliographic database. (subscription required)
  4. ^ "Jonathan Gregory NCAS". Archived from the original on 2005-04-07.
  5. ^ a b c "Professor Jonathan Gregory". metoffice.gov.uk.
  6. ^ Gregory, Jonathan Michael (1990). The VA1 trigger processor and a study of jet production. findit.bham.ac.uk (PhD thesis). University of Birmingham. OCLC 911147976.
  7. ^ "Understanding Climate Change". Met Office. Archived from the original on 2011-10-18.
  8. ^ a b Gregory, Jonathan M.; Huybrechts, Philippe; Raper, Sarah C. B. (2004). "Threatened loss of the Greenland ice-sheet" (PDF). Nature. 428 (6983): 616. doi:10.1038/428616a. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 15071587.
  9. ^ Pearce, Fred (2004). "Greenland ice cap 'doomed to meltdown'". newscientist.com. New Scientist. Accessed June 18, 2011
  10. ^ Archived 2005-02-06 at the Wayback Machine
  11. ^ Bolin, Bert; et al. (1995). "IPCC Second Assessment: Climate Change 1995. A Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change" (PDF). IPCC website. p. 68. Retrieved 2011-08-29.
  12. ^ Chapter 5: Observations: Oceanic Climate Change and Sea Level, IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, 2007, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Accessed June 18, 2011
  13. ^ Chapter 10: Global Climate Projections, IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, 2007, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Accessed July 29, 2011
  14. ^ White, Neil J. (2005). "Coastal and global averaged sea level rise for 1950 to 2000". Geophysical Research Letters. 32 (1). doi:10.1029/2004GL021391. ISSN 0094-8276.
  15. ^ Connolley, W. M.; Gregory, J. M.; Hunke, E.; McLaren, A. J. (2004). "On the Consistent Scaling of Terms in the Sea-Ice Dynamics Equation". Journal of Physical Oceanography. 34 (7): 1776–1780. doi:10.1175/1520-0485(2004)034<1776:OTCSOT>2.0.CO;2. ISSN 0022-3670.
  16. ^ Gregory, J. M. (2004). "Simulated and observed decadal variability in ocean heat content". Geophysical Research Letters. 31 (15). doi:10.1029/2004GL020258. ISSN 0094-8276.
  17. ^ Gregory, J. M.; Saenko, O. A.; Weaver, A. J. (2003). "The role of the Atlantic freshwater balance in the hysteresis of the meridional overturning circulation". Climate Dynamics. 21 (7–8): 707–717. doi:10.1007/s00382-003-0359-8. ISSN 0930-7575.
  18. ^ Gregory, J. M.; Stouffer, R. J.; Raper, S. C. B.; Stott, P. A.; Rayner, N. A. (2002). "An Observationally Based Estimate of the Climate Sensitivity". Journal of Climate. 15 (22): 3117–3121. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.468.8654. doi:10.1175/1520-0442(2002)015<3117:AOBEOT>2.0.CO;2. ISSN 0894-8755.
  19. ^ Encyclopedia of Ocean Sciences[ISBN missing]
  20. ^ Gregory, J. M.; Church, J. A.; Boer, G. J.; Dixon, K. W.; Flato, G. M.; Jackett, D. R.; Lowe, J. A.; O'Farrell, S. P.; Roeckner, E.; Russell, G. L.; Stouffer, R. J.; Winton, M. (2001). "Comparison of results from several AOGCMs for global and regional sea-level change 1900-2100". Climate Dynamics. 18 (3–4): 225–240. doi:10.1007/s003820100180. ISSN 0930-7575.
  21. ^ Jonathan Gregory, researcher profile, Met Office. Accessed June 18, 2011
  22. ^ Advanced ERC Fellow Archived 2009-12-20 at the Wayback Machine, Latest News, National Centre for Atmospheric Science, Natural Environment Research Council. Accessed June 18, 2011
  23. ^ Anon (2017). "Jonathan Gregory FRS". royalsociety.org. London: Royal Society. Archived from the original on 2017-05-23. One or more of the preceding sentences incorporates text from the royalsociety.org website where:

    “All text published under the heading 'Biography' on Fellow profile pages is available under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.” --Royal Society Terms, conditions and policies at the Wayback Machine (archived 2016-11-11)

  24. ^ Scientists from the National Centre for Atmospheric Science Share in the Nobel Peace Prize, Innovations Report, October 16, 2007. Accessed June 18, 2011