Julia Barrow

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Professor
Julia Barrow
FSA FRHistS FBA
Born (1956-12-05) 5 December 1956 (age 61)
Nationality British
Title Professor in Medieval Studies
Awards Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London
Fellow of the Royal Historical Society
Fellow of the British Academy
Academic background
Alma mater University of St Andrews
University of Oxford
Thesis 'The Bishops of Hereford and their acta 1163–1219 (1982)
Academic work
Discipline Historian
Sub-discipline Medieval history
Ecclesiastical history
Institutions University of Birmingham
Victoria County History
University of Nottingham
University of Leeds

Julia Steuart Barrow, FSA, FRHistS, FBA (born 5 December 1956) is a British historian and academic, who specialises in medieval and ecclesiastical history. Since 2012, she has been Professor in Medieval Studies at the University of Leeds and Director of its Institute for Medieval Studies.

Early life and education[edit]

Barrow was born on 5 December 1956 in London, England; her father was the historian G. W. S. Barrow.[1] She was educated at Westfield School, an all-girls independent school in Newcastle upon Tyne.[1] She studied Mediaeval History (sic) at the University of St Andrews, and graduated with an undergraduate Master of Arts (MA) degree in 1978.[2][3] She then undertook postgraduate research at the University of Oxford, and completed her Doctor of Philosophy (DPhil) degree in 1983.[2] Her doctoral thesis was titled "The Bishops of Hereford and their acta 1163–1219".[4]

Academic career[edit]

From 1986 to 1989, Barrow was a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Birmingham. Then, from 1989 to 1990, she worked for the Victoria County History of Cheshire. From 1990 to 2012, she was a lecturer at the University of Nottingham. In 2012, she moved to the University of Leeds where she had been appointed Professor in Medieval Studies and Director of its Institute for Medieval Studies.[2]

Barrow is a member of the Council of the Royal Historical Society.[3] Since 2014, she has been a member of the Joint Committee on Anglo-Saxon Charters.[5]

Honours[edit]

On 23 October 1997, Barrow was elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London (FSA).[6] In July 2016, she was elected a Fellow of the British Academy (FBA), the UK's national academy for the humanities and the social sciences.[7][8] She is also a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society (FRHistS).[9]

Selected works[edit]

  • Barrow, Julia S.; Brooks, N. P., eds. (2005). St Wulfstan and his world. Aldershot: Ashgate. ISBN 978-0754608028. 
  • Barrow, Julia; Wareham, Andrew, eds. (2007). Myth, rulership, church and charters: essays in honour of Nicholas Brooks. Aldershot: Ashgate. ISBN 978-0754651208. 
  • Barrow, Julia (2015). The Clergy in the Medieval World: Secular Clerics, their Families and Careers in North-Western Europe, c.800–c.1200. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-1107086388. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b 'BARROW, Prof. Julia Steuart', Who's Who 2017, A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc, 2017; online edn, Oxford University Press, 2016; online edn, Nov 2016 accessed 27 Sept 2017
  2. ^ a b c "Professor Julia Barrow". Institute for Medieval Studies. University of Leeds. 2016. Retrieved 21 July 2016. 
  3. ^ a b "Professor Julia Barrow". The Royal Historical Society. 2014. Retrieved 21 July 2016. 
  4. ^ "The Bishops of Hereford and their acta 1163–1219". E-Thesis Online Service. The British Library. 1982. Retrieved 21 July 2016. 
  5. ^ "Members of the Joint Committee on Anglo-Saxon Charters". Kemble: The Anglo-Saxon Charters Website. 1 June 2014. Archived from the original on 10 May 2014. Retrieved 21 July 2016. 
  6. ^ "Dr Julia S Barrow FSA". Fellows Directory. Society of Antiquaries of London. Retrieved 21 July 2016. 
  7. ^ "British Academy announces new President and elects 66 new Fellows". The British Academy. 15 July 2016. Retrieved 18 July 2016. 
  8. ^ "Professor Julia Barrow elected as British Academy Fellow". School of History. University of Leeds. 15 July 2016. Retrieved 21 July 2016. 
  9. ^ "Fellows - B" (pdf). Fellows of the Royal Historical Society. May 2016. Retrieved 21 July 2016.