Khrushchevism

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Mao Zedong (left) and Nikita Khrushchev (right)

Khrushchevism was a form of Marxism–Leninism which consisted of the theories and policies of Nikita Khrushchev and his administration in the Soviet Union.[1][2][3]

Mao Zedong recognized "Khrushchevism" as a distinct ideology and initially from a positive perspective, though later the term was used by the Chinese Communists as a term of derision against the politics of the Soviet Union.[4][5] Khrushchevism involves the rejection of Stalinism and particularly represents a movement away from Stalinist politics, including advocating a more liberal tolerance of some cultural dissent and deviance, a more welcoming international relations policy and attitude towards foreigners and a repudiation of Stalinist arbitrariness and terror tactics.[6] Khrushchevism was not only a phenomenon in the Soviet Union as it was initially admired in China and Mao sought to model the Chinese Marxist–Leninist state upon principles developed by Khrushchevism, but disputes with the Soviet Union later ended friendly relations between Mao and Khrushchev.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Robert F. Miller, Ferenc Féhér. Khrushchev and the communist world. Kent, England, UK; Fyshwick, Australia: Croom Helm Ltd., 1984. Pp. 1-5. Describes the term "Khrushchevism"
  2. ^ Milorad M. Drachkovitch. Marxism in the Modern World. Stanford, California, USA: Stanford University Press, 1965. Pp. 108. (Describes "Krushchevism")
  3. ^ Jeremy Smith. Khrushchevism after Khrushchev: The rise of national interest in the Eastern Bloc by Katalin Miklossy, Khrushchev in the Kremlin: policy and government in the Soviet Union, 1953-1964. Oxon, England, UK; New York, New York, USA: Routledge, 2011. Pp. 150.
  4. ^ Robert F. Miller, Ferenc Féhér. Khrushchev and the communist world. Kent, England, UK; Fyshwick, Australia: Croom Helm Ltd., 1984. Pp. 6-8.
  5. ^ Franz Schurmann. Ideology and Organization in Communist China. 2nd edition. Berkeley and Los Angeles, California, USA: University of California Press; London, England, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1968. Pp. 33. Shows the later use by the Chinese Communists of "Khrushchevism" as a term of derision.
  6. ^ Robert F. Miller, Ferenc Féhér. Khrushchev and the communist world. Kent, England, UK; Fyshwick, Australia: Croom Helm Ltd., 1984. Pp. 5.
  7. ^ Robert F. Miller, Ferenc Féhér. Khrushchev and the communist world. Kent, England, UK; Fyshwick, Australia: Croom Helm Ltd., 1984. Pp. 6-8.