Kirkuk–Baniyas pipeline

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Kirkuk–Baniyas pipeline
Kirkuk–Baniyas pipeline.svg
Location
Country Iraq
Syria
From Kirkuk oil field
To Baniyas
General information
Type crude oil
Commissioned 1952
Technical information
Length 800 km (500 mi)
Maximum discharge 0.3 million barrels per day (~1.5×10^7 t/a)

The Kirkuk–Baniyas pipeline is a crude oil pipeline from the Kirkuk oil field in Iraq to the Syrian port of Baniyas. The pipeline is around 800 kilometres (500 mi) long and the capacity is 300 thousand barrels per day (48×10^3 m3/d).[1] The pipeline was opened on 23 April 1952, during the 2003 invasion of Iraq, the pipeline was damaged by U.S. air-strikes and remained out of operation since then.[2]

On 17 December 2007, Syria and Iraq agreed to rehabilitate the pipeline, the pipeline was to be reconstructed by Stroytransgaz, a subsidiary of Gazprom.[3] However, Stroytransgaz failed to start the rehabilitation and the contract was nullified in April 2009,[4] as the rehabilitation of the existing pipeline occurred to be more costly than building a new pipeline, in September 2010 Iraq and Syria agreed to build two new Kirkuk–Baniyas pipelines.[5][6] One pipeline with capacity of 1.5 million barrels per day (240×10^3 m3/d) would carry heavier crude oil while another pipeline capacity of 1.25 million barrels per day (199×10^3 m3/d) would carry lighter crude oil.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Iraq picks Russia firm to fix Syria pipeline". Reuters. 2007-12-17. Retrieved 2008-01-14. 
  2. ^ "Iran, Syria: Pipeline Repairs and Diplomatic Deals". Lebanonwire. 2007-12-13. Retrieved 2008-01-14. 
  3. ^ "Russian firm seals Iraq pipe deal". Upstream Online. NHST Media Group. 2008-03-26. Retrieved 2008-04-05. 
  4. ^ "Iraq opens bids for Syria pipe job". Upstream Online. NHST Media Group. 2009-04-21. Retrieved 2010-09-21. 
  5. ^ Ajrash, Kadhim (2010-09-16). "Iraq, Syria Agree to Build Cross-Border Oil, Gas Pipelines, Official Says". Bloomberg. Retrieved 2010-09-21. 
  6. ^ Hafidh, Hassan (2010-09-20). "Iraq, Syria Agree to Build Crossborder Pipelines". Downstream Today. Dow Jones Newswires. Retrieved 2010-09-21. 
  7. ^ "Syria, Iraq to build pipeline". Tehran Times. The Tehran Times Daily Newspaper. 2010-09-20. Retrieved 2010-09-21. 

External links[edit]