click links in text for more info
SUMMARY / RELATED TOPICS

Women's fear of crime

Women's fear of crime refers to women's fear of being a victim of crime, independent of actual victimization. Although fear of crime is a concern for people of all genders, studies find that women around the world tend to have much higher levels of fear of crime than men, despite the fact that in many places, for most offenses, men's actual victimization rates are higher. Fear of crime is not the same. Women tend to have higher levels for fear of crime. In women's everyday lives, fear of crime can have negative effects, such as reducing their environmental mobility. Studies have shown that women tend to avoid certain behaviors, such as walking alone at night, because they are fearful of crime, would feel more comfortable with these behaviors if they felt safer. Social scientists have differing views on the causes of women's fear of crime; some have argued that women's heightened fear of crime is due to women's higher levels physical vulnerability compared to men, although feminist work resists this generalization and tries to relocate the cause to larger societal factors.

It is nonetheless important that most women are aware of pervasive cultural view that women are more vulnerable than men, which may make them think they are more to be victimized and therefore contribute to their fear. Some research has suggested that women are in fact not much more fearful about crime than men, but that dominant cultural ideas about masculinity may make men reluctant to talk about their fear or report it in surveys. One study has shown that women may have higher levels of fear of crime, not because they are scared of being victimized themselves, but fear of their children being victimized. Women are more than men to see their relationships with others as an interdependent relationship; this interdependent relationship makes women more scared of crimes being committed against their loved ones than themselves. This distinction of relationships cause women's fear of crime to be higher than men's fear of crime, because men do not see their relationships as interdependent; this study argues.

Feminist discourse on fear of crime tends to explain women's higher levels of fear with the unequal gender structure in most societies, which places women beneath men within the power structure and thus puts them at risk for victimization by men. This theory refers to the oppressive social control of women, arguing that some crimes against women and the socialization that women receive to feel vulnerable and fear male violence are used by the patriarchy to assert male dominance and "keep women in their place." Some feminist researchers argue that the questions that are being asked in studies of women's fear of crime do not adequately represent their actual fear. These researchers argue that abuse by men in close personal relationships is not adequately measured by typical questions on surveys, because those typical questions ask questions about crime outside of the home, they argue that women's victimization by people in their close personal relationships is not being used as a factor in measuring women's fear of crime.

One study has shown that women may have higher levels of fear of crime, not because they are scared of being victimized themselves, but fear of their children being victimized. Women are more than men to see their relationships with others as an interdependent relationship; this interdependent relationship makes women more scared of crimes being committed against their loved ones than themselves. This distinction of relationships cause women's fear of crime to be higher than men's fear of crime, because men do not see their relationships as interdependent; this study argues. As rape is by far the most gendered crime by victimization, some feminist scholars have suggested that fear of rape is the most important and most unique element of women's fear of crime, or that women's fear of crime is in fact a generalized fear of rape. Proponents of this theory referred to as the "shadow of sexual assault hypothesis," note that women tend to fear that rape will co-occur with other crimes, such as burglary, a fear, not found among men.

One study has shown that a man's typical response to a burglary was anger, while a woman's typical response was fear, typical of a woman, sexually assaulted. Some supporters of the theory note that sexual harassment, which most women will experience in their lifetimes contributes to the fear of rape. While the fear of rape is the strongest among women, men have a fear of rape when looking at college aged men. While the fear of rape is the strongest among women, men have a fear of rape when looking at college aged men. While men do fear sexual assault, they are more to fear crimes such as burglary, but there is evidence that men's fear of sexual assault is correlated with their fear of other violent crimes, supporting the shadow hypothesis; the fear of rape, unlike other fears of specific crimes, is exclusive to women. Among women, it is one of the strongest crime-related fears, is the strongest crime-related

DenG

Daniel Tom George, known professionally as DenG, is a Liberian singer and songwriter from Bong County. He started his music career as an R&B artist before making a guest appearance on Emma Smith's single "I Want to Go". DenG rose to prominence after being featured on Queen V's 2013 hit single "Jue You Bad". Following the success of "Jue You Bad", he switched from R&B to Afro pop. Daniel Tom George was born on September 1984, in Bong County, Liberia, he started his music career as an R&B artist before venturing into Afro pop music, was featured on Emma Smith's single "I Want to Go". DenG gained prominence in 2013 after being featured on Queen V's hit single "Jue You Bad", which features vocals by Tan Tan. In 2014, he released the single "They Vex", a song that addresses the jealousy associated with fame and recognition, his management team announced a tee-shirt collection, featuring the phrase "If they vex, let them buss", would arrive in Liberia. DenG collaborated with F. A and Soul Fresh to record "Ebola is Real", a hipco track that informs Liberians about ways they can protect and prevent the spread of Ebola.

Recorded in colloquial English, "Ebola is Real" was created in partnership with Liberia's Ministry of Health & Social Welfare and the radio station Hott FM. In 2015, DenG won Artist of the Year and Song of the Year for "They Vex" at the 2015 Liberia Music Awards, he won Best Artist and Song of the Year for "They Vex" at the 2015 Liberian Entertainment Awards. DenG signed a $50,000 endorsement deal with a GSM carrier, he released "Kemah" in 2015. In January 2016, DenG posted a note on his Facebook page. However, in a telephone interview with LIB Life, he clarified his post was intended to find out whether Liberians still had interest in his career; the music video for DenG's "Put Foot" was released in January 2016. DenG first announced plans for the video's release earlier that month, he accused his manager Alice Yawo of downgrading the video's quality after she thanked a fan, who belittled the video, for their comments. In June 2016, DenG and Yawo split as a result of a fallout from their unwillingness to communicate.

DenG was nominated for Listener's Choice at the 2016 MTV Africa Music Awards, becoming the first Liberian artist to receive a MAMA nomination. In late 2016, he performed alongside Christoph the Change and Tekno at Beach Jam, a concert sponsored by Lonestar Cell. On June 9, 2017, DenG released the Sarkodie-assisted track "Janjay", it was jointly produced by Ghana's Possigee. Described as a Liberian highlife song, "Janjay" contains lyrics pertaining to a girl's dream. Prior to the song's release, DenG enlisted Kcee to appear on his track "Make Dem Talk". In July 2017, Emma Smith recruited DenG to lent vocals to her single "Hold Ground", an up-tempo track that has elements of Afrobeat and dancehall. In May 2018, DenG organized the first leg of his American tour. In August 2018, he performed at the One Africa Music Fest, becoming the first Liberian act to perform at the festival. Held at the Ford Amphitheater at Coney Island, the festival featured additional performances from Wizkid, Flavour N'abania, Sarkodie, Cassper Nyovest and Diamond Platnumz.

DenG was one of the Liberian acts. In January 2018, The New Dawn newspaper reported DenG's brother. George's body was discovered with foam around his mouth

Symmons Plains Estate

Symmons Plains Estate is a historic farm and mansion in the locality of the same name, near Perth, Tasmania. A 856ha property, the estate dates back to 1820s, with the main Georgian house built in 1839, it is listed on the Tasmanian Heritage Register. In 1978, the homestead and its garden and outbuildings were registered on the now-defunct Register of the National Estate; the property was granted to Rev. John Youl in the 1820s; the house was built in 1839, the Youl family lived at the property for 7 generations. In 1960, racing driver and family heir John Youl developed neighbouring Symmons Plains Raceway from part of the property; the house came to worldwide media attention in 2011 when a false story of the home being sold to J. K Rowling for 10 million AUD was printed by Women's Day; the story was picked up by national and international news outlets, including the Daily Mail, Sunrise Breakfast Show, Perez Hilton and Nine News, but it was debunked by news outlets including The Examiner and ABC's Media Watch.

In reality it was purchased by Clovelly Tasmania, a farming subsidiary of the Ingleby Company

William J. Castagna

William John Castagna is a Senior United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida. Born in Philadelphia, Castagna served in the United States Air Force from 1943 to 1945, he received his Bachelor of Laws from the Fredric G. Levin College of Law at the University of Florida in 1949 and a Juris Doctor from the same institution in 1967, he was in private practice in Miami, Florida from 1949 to 1950 and in Clearwater from 1950 to 1979. United States President Jimmy Carter nominated Castagna to the United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida on June 5, 1979, to a new seat created by 92 Stat. 1629. Confirmed by the Senate on July 23, 1979, received commission a day later. Castagna assumed senior status on June 29, 1992. William John Castagna at the Biographical Directory of Federal Judges, a public domain publication of the Federal Judicial Center

Victor Mukasa

Victor Juliet Mukasa is a Ugandan human rights activist and former chairman of the Sexual Minorities Uganda. Mukasa identifies as a trans-lesbian and is an executive director at Kuchu Diaspora Alliance-USA. Mukasa was raised in a conservative Catholic family. Growing up, he preferred dressing like a tomboy, his mother became accommodating to his style of dressing but his father thought of him as stubborn and sometimes punished for his behavior. He attended Uganda Institute of Bankers. Uganda was hostile to the LGBT community and Mukasa felt he had to follow the mainstream norm, he attended churches but ended discouraged when one performed a form of exorcism on him, he soon faced discrimination as a result. Mukasa became active in the LGBT movement in East Africa, he co-founded SMUG and helped launch other groups including Freedom and Roam Uganda and East and Horn of Africa Human Rights Defenders Project. In 2005, local police raided Victor's home without a search warrant and confiscated LGBT related documents.

Victor and a fellow activist, Yvonne Oyoo were detained by the police. At the time of the raid, the mainstream press in Uganda, the government and many AIDS activists articulated homophobic viewpoints. After his release, he fled to South Africa for a brief period. In 2007, he returned to Uganda and held a press conference on LGBT rights supported by individuals who covered their faces with masks. Victor unexpectedly filed an'Application for enforcement of rights guaranteed in the Bill of Rights' challenging his and Yvonne's detention and police abuse. In December 2008, a judgement from the High Court decided that Uganda's human rights laws extends to all citizens including the LGBT community, he went on exile to South Africa where he worked as a program associate at the Cape town office of International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission