La Ventana (yearbook)

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La Ventana
1942LaVentana.jpg
'A copy of La Ventana from 1942'
Country United States
Language English
Genre Yearbook
Published 1925 (first volume)[1]
Publisher Texas Tech University
Media type Print (Hardback)
Pages 352
Website "La Ventana"

La Ventana is the yearbook of Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas. The student media organization began its publication in 1925.[2]

As one of the oldest traditions at Texas Tech University, La Ventana (Spanish for “the window”) serves as the school’s primary source of recorded history. Its mission is to produce an outstanding depiction of the life of Texas Tech students in an accurate, appealing and innovative manner with broad coverage, in-depth stories, dynamic photographs, tight organization and creative design.[3]

La Ventana operates under the direction of an editorial board made up entirely of Texas Tech students. This group oversees the student staff. Student Media advisers oversee the activities of the yearbook; however, content is determined entirely by the student staff.[3]

La Ventana is printed each spring semester and distributed at the end of the spring semester.[3]

History[edit]

Beginning[edit]

The first volume of La Ventana was edited by James Biggers. It began in 1925 and was published in 1926 for Texas Technological College, as Texas Tech University was known at the time. The name was chosen in keeping with the university's Spanish-themed architecture, which was also reflected in the name of the student newspaper The Toreador and in the name of the football team (at the time) The Matadors.[4] The words la ventana mean "the window". As the premier volume states:

The editors express the hope it will serve not only as a window through which the world will gaze on the achievements of your first year, but as the window through which it can behold the dawning glory and splendor of the Greater Institution that is to be.

— La Ventana Vol. 1[4]

Growth[edit]

The first color photos appeared in the book in 1933. Progress continued until the beginning of World War II. During the war years, it focused on victory themes, shrank in size, and re-used some older photos to fill space. Following the war, growth resumed and, by the 1950s, La Ventana was up to an average of 500 pages.[4] In 1959, La Ventana went to a magazine format, with the book divided into sections mimicking national magazines such as Post, Sports Illustrated, and Life. The different sections represented different aspects of life at Texas Tech. Sports Illustrated focused on campus sports. Life looked at college life in general and Post covered honor councils and student government.[4]

Awards[edit]

Associated Collegiate Press

  • 1982 Yearbook Pacemaker
  • 1995 Yearbook Pacemaker[5]
  • 1996 Yearbook Pacemaker[6]
  • 1997 Yearbook Pacemaker Finalist[7]
  • 1999 Yearbook Pacemaker Finalist[8]
  • 2009 Yearbook Pacemaker Finalist[9]
  • 2015 Yearbook Pacemaker Finalist[10]

Columbia Scholastic Press Association

  • 1997 Gold Crown Certificate[11]
  • 1999 Silver Crown Certificate[12]
  • 2000 Gold Crown Certificate[13]
  • 2002 Silver Crown Certificate[14]

Editorial Staff[edit]

The La Ventana yearbook is made by a student editorial staff consisting of an editor-in-chief, copy editor, multimedia staff, and graphic artists. Although student ran La Ventana is managed by two advisors, Sheri Lewis[15], Associate Director/Media Adviser and Andrea Watson[15], Assistant Director/Media adviser they do not control the content but instead make suggestions and provide valuable resources to the student media staff.

Current[edit]

  • Davian Hopkins, Editor-In-Chief[16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Toreador, The Daily. "La Ventana Yearbook". The Daily Toreador. Retrieved 2018-04-23. 
  2. ^ Toreador, The Daily. "La Ventana Yearbook". The Daily Toreador. Retrieved 2018-04-23. 
  3. ^ a b c "Texas Tech University :: Student Media :: La Ventana". www.depts.ttu.edu. Retrieved 2018-04-23. 
  4. ^ a b c d Siegrist, Nikki; Lenz, Jason (February 24, 2003). "La Ventana keeps same theme since 1925". The Daily Toreador. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  5. ^ "1995 ACP Yearbook Pacemakers". www.studentpress.org. Associated Collegiate Press. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  6. ^ "1996 ACP Yearbook Pacemakers". www.studentpress.org. Associated Collegiate Press. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  7. ^ "1997 ACP Yearbook Pacemakers". www.studentpress.org. Associated Collegiate Press. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  8. ^ "1999 ACP Yearbook Pacemakers". www.studentpress.org. Associated Collegiate Press. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  9. ^ "2009 ACP Yearbook Pacemakers". www.studentpress.org. Associated Collegiate Press. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  10. ^ "ACP - 2015 Yearbook Pacemaker finalists announced". studentpress.org. Retrieved 2018-04-23. 
  11. ^ "1997 - Awards For Student Work Crown Awards - Collegiate Recipients". www.cspa.columbia.edu. Columbia Scholastic Press Association. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  12. ^ "1999 - Awards For Student Work Crown Awards - Collegiate Recipients". www.cspa.columbia.edu. Columbia Scholastic Press Association. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  13. ^ "2000 - Awards For Student Work Crown Awards - Collegiate Recipients". www.cspa.columbia.edu. Columbia Scholastic Press Association. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  14. ^ "2002 - Awards For Student Work Crown Awards - Collegiate Recipients". www.cspa.columbia.edu. Columbia Scholastic Press Association. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  15. ^ a b "Contact Us". The Daily Toreador. Retrieved 2018-04-23. 
  16. ^ Thurston, Jaret (March 7th). "Hopkinsto return as editors-in-chief for La Ventana". The Daily Toreador. Retrieved 2018-04-23.  Check date values in: |date= (help)

External links[edit]