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Lemoore Station, California

Lemoore Station is a census-designated place in Naval Air Station Lemoore, Kings County, United States. It is part of the Hanford–Corcoran Metropolitan Statistical Area; the population was 7,438 as of the 2010 United States Census. Lemoore Station is located at 36°15′38″N 119°53′31″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 4.2 square miles, all of it land. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Lemoore Station has a semi-arid climate, abbreviated "BSk" on climate maps; the 2010 United States Census reported that Lemoore Station had a population of 7,438. The population density was 1,768.7 people per square mile. The racial makeup of Lemoore Station was 4,883 White, 729 African American, 70 Native American, 560 Asian, 53 Pacific Islander, 418 from other races, 725 from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1,445 persons; the Census reported that 5,495 people lived in households, 1,923 lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, 20 were institutionalized.

There were 1,585 households, out of which 1,253 had children under the age of 18 living in them, 1,382 were opposite-sex married couples living together, 133 had a female householder with no husband present, 26 had a male householder with no wife present. There were 8 unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, 11 same-sex married couples or partnerships. 37 households were made up of individuals and 1 had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.47. There were 1,541 families; the population was spread out with 2,407 people under the age of 18, 2,205 people aged 18 to 24, 2,682 people aged 25 to 44, 130 people aged 45 to 64, 14 people who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 22.5 years. For every 100 females, there were 144.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 166.8 males. There were 1,627 housing units at an average density of 386.9 per square mile, of which 5 were owner-occupied, 1,580 were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 0%.

19 people lived in owner-occupied housing units and 5,476 people lived in rental housing units. As of the census of 2000, there were 5,749 people, 1,309 households, 1,286 families residing in the CDP; the population density was 1,359.3 people per square mile. There were 1,390 housing units at an average density of 328.6/sq mi. The racial makeup of the CDP was 61.68% White, 10.96% African American, 1.30% Native American, 9.57% Asian, 0.77% Pacific Islander, 8.94% from other races, 6.78% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 16.84% of the population. There were 1,309 households out of which 80.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 92.2% were married couples living together, 3.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 1.7% were non-families. 1.5% of all households were made up of individuals and none had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.56 and the average family size was 3.56. In the CDP, the population was spread out with 35.4% under the age of 18, 26.4% from 18 to 24, 36.7% from 25 to 44, 1.3% from 45 to 64, 0.2% who were 65 years of age or older.

The median age was 22 years. For every 100 females, there were 138.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 158.3 males. The median income for a household in the CDP was $30,449, the median income for a family was $30,407. Males had a median income of $21,035 versus $20,144 for females; the per capita income for the CDP was $12,682. About 5.7% of families and 6.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.1% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over. In the state legislature, Lemoore Station is located in the 16th Senate District, represented by Republican Andy Vidak, in the 32nd Assembly District, represented by Democrat Rudy Salas. Federally, Hanford is located in California's 21st congressional district and is represented by Republican David Valadao. Lemoore Station is represented on the Kings County Board of Supervisors by Doug Verboon

Pedigree collapse

In genealogy, pedigree collapse describes how reproduction between two individuals who share an ancestor causes the number of distinct ancestors in the family tree of their offspring to be smaller than it could otherwise be. Robert C. Gunderson coined the term. Without pedigree collapse, a person's ancestor tree is a binary tree, formed by the person, the parents, the grandparents, great-grandparents, so on. However, the number of individuals in such a tree grows exponentially and will become impossibly high. For example, a single individual alive today would, over 30 generations going back to the High Middle Ages, have 230 or a billion ancestors, more than the total world population at the time; this paradox is explained by shared ancestors, referred to as pedigree collapse. Instead of consisting of all different individuals, a tree may have multiple places occupied by a single individual; this happens when the parents of an ancestor are related to each other. For example, the offspring of two first cousins has at most only six great-grandparents instead of the normal eight.

This reduction in the number of ancestors is pedigree collapse. It collapses the ancestor tree into a directed acyclic graph. In some cultures and other relations were permitted, encouraged, or required to marry; this may have been to keep kin bonds and property within a family or because there was a limited number of potential marriage partners available. Among royalty, the frequent requirement to only marry other royals resulted in a reduced gene pool in which most individuals were the result of extensive pedigree collapse. Alfonso XII of Spain, for example, had only four great-grandparents instead of the usual eight. Furthermore, two of these great-grandparents, Charles IV of Spain and Maria Luisa of Parma, who were first cousins, were parents of another twice great-grandmother, Maria Isabella of Spain. Charles IV was the brother of another twice great-grandparent, Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies. More in many cultures intermarriage may occur within a small village, limiting the available gene pool.

The House of Habsburg gives a well-documented example of pedigree collapse. In the case of Charles II, the last Habsburg King of Spain, there were three uncle-niece marriages among the seven unions of his immediate ancestry, his father and two of his great-grandfathers married their nieces. His paternal grandparents were first cousins once removed, but they comprised two of the seven marriages because they were parents to his maternal grandmother, his maternal grandparents' marriage and the final marriage of great-grandparents was between first cousins. The maximum pedigree collapse of 50% within a single generation is caused by procreation between full siblings. If two half-siblings procreate, their children have three grandparents instead of four. If a child and parent were to procreate, their offspring would have four grandparents. If a person procreates with a full sibling of one of their parents, the offspring have four different persons as grandparents, eight great-grandparents, but again some of these contribute no additional genes.

Small, isolated populations such as those of remote islands represent extreme examples of pedigree collapse, but the common historical tendency to marry those within walking distance, due to the relative immobility of the population before modern transport, meant that most marriage partners were at least distantly related. In America around the 19th century, the tendency of immigrants to marry among their ethnic, language or cultural group produced many cousin marriages. If one considers as a function of time t the number of a given individual's ancestors who were alive at time t, it is that for most individuals this function has a maximum at around 1200 AD, it has been suggested. How many ancestors do you have?, Stephen Lewis, The Wild Peak, March 4, 2012

York Suburban Senior High School

York Suburban High School is a Middle-States accredited, comprehensive four-year high school with an enrollment of 850 students located in Spring Garden Township in the U. S. state of Pennsylvania. York Suburban opened its doors in September 1958 as a school housing 1250 students in grades 7-12. At the time, there were 53 instructors on a team of 61 professionals; the school was modified to accommodate only grades 9-12, as it does today. Students may select from 150 courses to fill a ten-period day on a six-day cycle. Offerings in English, social studies, science and foreign languages are year-long courses taught at the General, College Preparatory, Honors courses; some classes are available at the AP level. Full year courses are awarded 1.0 credits. 4 years of English, 3 years of Science, Social Studies, Mathematics, 7 in electives including courses in health, driving safety, computer applications are required. Twenty athletic teams compete for the Trojans of YS; the school has two synthetic turf fields made by Sprinturf which opened in 2007.

The York Suburban boys basketball team won districts for the 2008–2009 season. The boys swim team won the PIAA AA State Team Championship in 2006, 2007, 2008; the boys cross-country team won the PIAA AA State Championships in 2009. The girls cross-country team completed their seasons 18-0 in both the 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 seasons and placed all of their top runners in the top 20 at the YAIAA championships in 2010 and 2011. Theatre opportunities include a junior and senior class play, drama club, annual musical and a chapter of the International Thespian Society. There is a National Honor Society, National Art Honor Society, French Honor Society, German honor society, more a Spanish Honor Society; the music program includes opportunities in Marching and Concert band, Concert Choir, YS Singers and Sweet Adelines, Jazz Band, String Ensemble, Wind Ensemble, Pep Band. There is an active Student Council with a membership of 90 students. YS has a student newspaper. There is an active Chess Club, Project Harmony, Green Club, Ski Club, Ping Pong Club, Best Buddies, Science Olympiad, SADD.

The York Suburban Marching Band had the privilege of performing the Star Spangled Banner before Game 2 of the 1969 World Series, between the Baltimore Orioles and the New York Mets. The game ended with the Mets winning 2-1. Craig Sheffer Todd Platts Ken Ludwig Evan Sharp Official site

Grant County, Minnesota

Grant County is a county in the U. S. state of Minnesota. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 6,018, its county seat is Elbow Lake. The county was created on March 6, 1868, it was named for US President Ulysses S. Grant, its government was organized in 1874. The Chippewa River flows southward through the eastern part of Grant County; the Mustinka River flows south and west-southwest through the upper and central parts of western Grant County. The terrain consists of low rolling hills dotted with lakes, its usable areas devoted to agriculture; the terrain slopes to the south and east. The county has a total area of 575 square miles, of which 548 square miles is land and 27 square miles is water; as of the 2000 United States Census, there were 6,289 people, 2,534 households, 1,740 families in the county. The population density was 11.6/sqmi. There were 3,098 housing units at an average density of 5.74/sqmi. The racial makeup of the county was 98.28% White, 0.21% Black or African American, 0.27% Native American, 0.19% Asian, 0.30% from other races, 0.75% from two or more races.

0.52% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 41.2 % were of Norwegian, 7.4 % Swedish ancestry. There were 2,534 households out of which 29.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.00% were married couples living together, 6.50% had a female householder with no husband present, 31.30% were non-families. 28.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.50% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.40 and the average family size was 2.94. The county population contained 23.90% under the age of 18, 6.90% from 18 to 24, 23.10% from 25 to 44, 23.20% from 45 to 64, 22.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 94.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.30 males. The median income for a household in the county was $33,775, the median income for a family was $42,214. Males had a median income of $28,428 versus $20,240 for females; the per capita income for the county was $17,131.

About 6.00% of families and 8.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.50% of those under age 18 and 9.90% of those age 65 or over. Grant County is a swing district with a Republican bent. In 56% of national elections since 1980 has the county selected the Republican Party candidate. National Register of Historic Places listings in Grant County, Minnesota Grant County Website

1991–92 Minnesota North Stars season

The 1991–92 Minnesota North Stars season was the North Stars' 25th, penultimate season in the Twin Cities area. A major aspect of the season was that several players were lost to the San Jose Sharks expansion team. Minnesota's draft picks at the 1991 NHL Entry Draft held at the Buffalo Memorial Auditorium in Buffalo, New York; the Sharks selected 24 players from the North Stars. The reason for the Dispersal Draft was attributed the fact that a compromise was implemented for the 1990–91 season; the previous owners of the North Stars, the Gund brothers were awarded an expansion team in the Bay Area, that would be called the San Jose Sharks. The Sharks would receive players via a dispersal draft with the North Stars. After the Expansion Draft, the North Stars traded Kelly Kisio to the Sharks in order to reacquire Shane Churla; the North Stars allowed the most short-handed goals during the regular season, with 22. Divisions: NRS – Norris, SMY – Smythe bold – Qualified for playoffs Note: GP = Games played.

Krångede Hydroelectric Power Station

Krångede Hydroelectric Power Station is a run-of-the-river hydroelectric power plant on the Indalsälven in Jämtland County, Sweden. About 15 km downstream of Krångede is the urban area Hammarstrand. Work on the power plant began in 1931, it was operational in 1936. Krångede power plant is owned by Fortum. Krångede Dam is a concrete gravity dam; the dam features a spillway with 4 gates over the dam, located in the middle. The power plant contains 6 Francis turbine-generators; the total nameplate capacity is 248.4 MW. Its average annual generation is 1622.4 GWh. The hydraulic head is 60 m. List of hydroelectric power stations in Sweden "Krångede Hydroelectric Power Station". Wikimapia. Retrieved 2016-05-29. "Hydroelectric Plants in Northern Sweden". Power Plants Around the World. Retrieved 2016-05-29