Leonard I. Garth

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Leonard I. Garth
Senior Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit
In office
June 30, 1986 – September 22, 2016
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit
In office
August 6, 1973 – June 30, 1986
Appointed byRichard Nixon
Preceded byJames Rosen
Succeeded byMorton Ira Greenberg
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey
In office
December 18, 1969 – August 29, 1973
Appointed byRichard Nixon
Preceded byThomas M. Madden
Succeeded byHerbert Jay Stern
Personal details
Born(1921-04-07)April 7, 1921
Brooklyn, New York, U.S.
DiedSeptember 22, 2016(2016-09-22) (aged 95)
Spouse(s)
Sarah Kaufman
(m. 1942; death 2015)
EducationColumbia University (B.A.)
Harvard Law School (LL.B.)

Leonard I. Garth (April 7, 1921 – September 22, 2016) was a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and previously was a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey.

Education and career[edit]

Garth was born in Brooklyn, New York, and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree from Columbia University in 1942, he served during World War II as a United States Army Lieutenant from 1943 to 1946. Upon his return, he received his Bachelor of Laws from Harvard Law School in 1952, and built a private practice in Paterson, New Jersey.[1]

Federal judicial service[edit]

On July 22, 1969, Garth was nominated by President Richard Nixon to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey vacated by Judge Thomas M. Madden. Garth was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 17, 1969, and received his commission on December 18, 1969, his service terminated on August 29, 1973, due to his elevation to the Third Circuit.[1]

On July 19, 1973, President Nixon nominated Garth to a seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit vacated by Judge James Rosen. Garth was confirmed by the Senate on August 3, 1973, and received his commission on August 6, 1973,[1] he assumed senior status on June 30, 1986, serving in that status until his death on September 22, 2016.[2]

Concurrent with his federal court service, Garth was a lecturer at Rutgers Law School starting in 1978 and at Seton Hall University School of Law starting in 1980.[1]

Notable case[edit]

Garth wrote the opinion in Sullivan v. Barnett, 139 F.3d 158 (3d Cir. 1998). This decision was reversed by the United States Supreme Court in American Manufacturers Mutual Insurance Company v. Sullivan, 526 U.S. 40 (1999).[3]

Notable clerks[edit]

Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito clerked for Garth from 1976 to 1977 in his first job out of law school.[2] Law professors who clerked for Judge Garth include former Co-Dean Ronald Chen of Rutgers Law School, Orin Kerr of USC Gould School of Law, Norman I. Silber of Hofstra Law School (and Research Scholar at Yale Law School), and Louis Virelli of Stetson Law School. Harvey Rishikof is Professor of Law and National Security Studies at the National War College and previously the Dean of Roger Williams University School of Law.

Personal life[edit]

In 1942, he married Sarah Kaufman, and they had a daughter.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Leonard I. Garth at the Biographical Directory of Federal Judges, a public domain publication of the Federal Judicial Center.
  2. ^ a b 'Rutgers Law Mourns the Passing of Judge Leonard I. Garth,' Rutgers Law, September 23, 2016
  3. ^ "American Manufacturers Mutual Insurance Company v. Sullivan, 526 U.S. 40 (1999)". Oyez.com. Retrieved November 17, 2018.
  4. ^ "Leonard Garth Obituary". The New York Times. Legacy.com. September 25, 2016. Retrieved November 17, 2018.

External links[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
Thomas M. Madden
Judge of the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey
1969–1973
Succeeded by
Herbert Jay Stern
Preceded by
James Rosen
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit
1973–1986
Succeeded by
Morton Ira Greenberg