List of Brentford F.C. managers

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Dean Smith is the current Brentford head coach.

Brentford Football Club is an English professional football club based in Brentford, Hounslow, London. Between 1897 and 1920, the first team competed in the London League, Southern League and Western League.[1] Since 1920, the first team has competed in the Football League and other nationally and internationally organised competitions. All managers who have managed at least one first team match are listed below.

From Brentford's formation in 1889 and until 1900, the club's first team was run by a committee.[2] William Lewis was installed as the Bees' first official secretary-manager, appointed in May 1900.[2] Fred Halliday was at the helm for Brentford's first ever Football League fixture in August 1920.[2] The club has had 40 full-time managers, with the most recent appointment being Dean Smith on 30 November 2015.[3]

The club's most successful manager was Harry Curtis, who after being appointed in May 1926, won the Third Division South and Second Division titles in the 1932–33 and 1934–35 seasons respectively to win promotion to First Division for the only time in the club's history.[4] Curtis recorded Brentford's highest-ever league position (fifth in 1935–36) and led the First Division for three months during the 1937–38 season.[5] Brentford also won the 1935 London Senior Cup, the 1942 London War Cup and reached the FA Cup sixth round three times during Curtis' tenure.[5]

The club has never won a senior competitive cup (reaching the final of the Football League Trophy in 1985, 2001 and 2011), but several other managers have won silverware in the form of league championships: Malky MacDonald (Fourth Division, 1962–63), Phil Holder (Third Division, 1991–92), Ron Noades (Third Division, 1998–99) and Andy Scott (League Two, 2008–09).

The majority of Brentford's managers have been English, with Scotland being the next-best represented (Jimmy Bain, Malky MacDonald, John Docherty and Frank McLintock). Uwe Rösler (Germany) was Brentford's first overseas manager.

An overhaul of the club's management structure prior to the beginning of the 2015–16 season saw the manager's position redefined and renamed as that of "head coach",[6] with Marinus Dijkhuizen being the first appointment to the new role on 1 June 2015.[7]

Managerial history[edit]

1889–1926: Early Southern League years and election to the Football League[edit]

In the early years of Brentford, first team affairs were run by a committee involving any or all of the club's directors, secretary, trainer or captain, who presided over the selection of the team and the arrangement of friendly fixtures.[2] For 11 years after the club's formation in 1889, leading figures in the running of the first team included secretaries Archer Green, C. West, A .E. Harriss, William Brown, J. Hinton-Bailey and captain J. J. K. Curtis.[8][9][10][11]

Fresh off the back of wins in the London Senior Cup and Middlesex Senior Cup in the 1897–98 season, Brentford were elected into the Southern League and commenced play in Second Division London in the 1898–99 season.[1] William Lewis took over as the club's first official manager in August 1900, leading the club to the Second Division title in his first season.[1] Former Everton secretary-manager Dick Molyneux replaced him in May 1903 and together with his successors William Brown and Fred Halliday,[2] kept Brentford in the First Division.[1] Halliday brought silverware to Griffin Park in the shape of the Southern Professional Charity Cup in the 1908–09 season.[12] With league form faltering, Halliday resigned from his position in November 1912 and was replaced by Dusty Rhodes, who could not prevent the Bees from slipping back into the Second Division at the end of the 1912–13 season.[2]

Competitive football was halted for the duration of the First World War in 1915 and play resumed in 1919, with Brentford being elevated to the Southern League First Division and Fred Halliday, in his second spell as manager,[2] recording a mid-table finish.[1] Brentford were elected into the Football League as founder members of the Third Division South in 1920 and Halliday guided the club to a 15th-place finish before leaving the manager's position for a second time.[2] Archie Mitchell took over as manager, presiding over some forgettable seasons before Halliday was reinstated for the third time in December 1924, successfully gaining re-election at the end of a torrid 1924–25 season.[2] Halliday managed a mid-table finish in 1925–26, before leaving his position for the final time at the end of the season.[2]

1926–1949: March up the leagues and First Division heyday[edit]

Former Gillingham manager Harry Curtis was installed in the Brentford hot-seat in May 1926 and the most successful period of the club's history began.[2] Curtis' side won all 21 home games in the 1929–30 Third Division South, a national record which still stands.[5] The team consistently challenged for promotion and buoyed by the inspired triple-signing from Middlesbrough of Jack Holliday, Billy Scott and Herbert Watson, Curtis' side won the Third Division South championship in the 1932–33 season and the Second Division/London Challenge Cup double two years later.[5] In Brentford's debut season in the First Division, Curtis led the club to its highest-ever league placing of 5th and secured 6th-place finishes in the following two seasons.[1] Curtis' wheeler-dealer skills in the transfer market kept Brentford competitive in the league, making a profit on the sale of players and developing his signings into internationals, including Billy Scott and Les Smith (England), David McCulloch, Bobby Reid and Duncan McKenzie (Scotland) and Idris Hopkins (Wales).[5]

Brentford reached the sixth round of the FA Cup for the first time in March 1938 and led the First Division for three months earlier in the 1937–38 season, but the run of success was brought to an end by the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939.[5] Curtis added further silverware to the Griffin Park trophy room during the war years, winning the 1942 London War Cup in what is to date, Brentford's only Wembley triumph.[13] A dearth of players up to the standard of the mid-1930s squad put Brentford into decline in the early post-war years, with the side's relegation to the Second Division in 1947 preceding Curtis' resignation in February 1949.[5] The bright spot of the period were runs to the sixth round of the FA Cup in 1946 and 1949.[1]

1949–1978: Decline and financial woes[edit]

Jackie Gibbons took over as manager in February 1949, successfully avoiding relegation to the Third Division South, before a failure to progress beyond a couple of mid-table Second Division finishes led him to resign in August 1952.[14] Harry Curtis' longtime assistant Jimmy Bain steadied the ship until Tommy Lawton took over as player/manager in January 1953.[14] An awful start to the 1953–54 season led Lawton to resign and the appointment of Bill Dodgin, Sr. failed to improve matters, with Brentford suffering relegation to the Third Division South in May 1954.[15] It was only after the appointment of Malky MacDonald in May 1957 (who had returned to the club after serving as a player and coach under Harry Curtis in the late 1940s) that fortunes changed.[15] Like his predecessors since the Second World War, MacDonald relied on products of the club's youth system.[15] The goals of homegrown forwards Jim Towers and George Francis fired the Bees to 2nd and 3rd-place finishes in the 1957–58 and 1958–59 seasons respectively,[1] before their sales in 1961 cut off the team's goal supply.[16] The Brentford board also reduced the number of playing staff to 16, with six players being retained on a part-time basis,[17] which led to the club suffering relegation to the Fourth Division in 1962.[16] MacDonald's big money signings of John Dick, Johnny Brooks and Billy McAdams completed an all-international forward line and the team won the 1962–63 Fourth Division championship at a canter.[18]

MacDonald's former trainer Tommy Cavanagh built on his good work,[15] missing out on promotion to the Second Division by two points and winning the London Challenge Cup in the 1964–65 season, but with Brentford staring at relegation in April 1966, Cavanagh was sacked.[19] His replacement Billy Gray could not keep the club in the Third Division and after a takeover bid by Queens Park Rangers in January 1967,[20] Jimmy Sirrel was installed as manager.[19] The one positive moment of Sirrel's cash-strapped reign was winning the 1966–67 London Challenge Cup and it was Frank Blunstone who brought the good times back to Griffin Park, finishing 3rd in the 1971–72 season to secure promotion to the Third Division with a squad of just 14 players.[19] After failing to preserve the club's third-tier status and falling-out with the board, Blunstone resigned in July 1973.[21] Mike Everitt and John Docherty failed to compete in the Fourth Division, before promotion back to the third-tier was accomplished under Bill Dodgin, Jr. in the 1977–78 season.[22]

1978–2000: Rooted in the third-tier[edit]

In 1978, Brentford began a period of 14 consecutive seasons in the Third Division, finishing mostly in mid-table and narrowly avoiding relegation under Frank McLintock in 1983–84.[23] McLintock took Brentford to the 1985 Football League Trophy Final, which was lost 3–1 to Wigan Athletic.[23] Following the appointment of McLintock's assistant Steve Perryman in February 1987, the foundations were set for a promotion bid after Perryman's signings of strikers Dean Holdsworth and Gary Blissett.[23] Brentford reached the sixth round of the FA Cup and the semi-finals of the Football League Trophy in 1988–89 and despite Perryman's shock resignation on the eve of the 1990–91 season,[23] his assistant Phil Holder took over and led the Bees into their first playoff campaign in May 1991 and to promotion to the second-tier as champions 12 months later.[24] Holder's Bees were relegated from the newly renamed First Division at the first time of asking, but challenged for promotion from the Second Division under David Webb in 1994–95 and 1996–97, failing in the playoffs on both occasions.[24]

By the time Webb took over the ownership of the club and replaced himself with Eddie May in August 1997,[4] the sales of key players Nicky Forster, Marcus Bent, Paul Smith, Barry Ashby, Martin Grainger and Carl Asaba left too great a void to fill and May lasted just three months in the job.[24] Brentford were relegated at the end of the 1997–98 season under Micky Adams.[25] Ron Noades took over the club as chairman in the summer of 1998 and installed himself as manager, supported by coaches Ray Lewington, Terry Bullivant and Brian Sparrow.[25] A cash injection saw the Bees win the Third Division title at the first attempt and return straight back to the Second Division, claiming the championship with a final-day win over eventual runners-up Cambridge United at the Abbey Stadium.[25]

2000–2015: Near-misses and turnaround[edit]

Noades' signings of forward Lloyd Owusu, midfielders Paul Evans and Gavin Mahon and central defenders Darren Powell and Ívar Ingimarsson in 1998 and 1999 formed the bedrock of the team which reached the 2001 Football League Trophy Final under Ray Lewington and the 2002 Second Division Playoff Final under Steve Coppell.[25][26] The side broke up in the summer of 2002 and went into decline under Coppell's replacement Wally Downes, with Martin Allen replacing Downes in March 2004 and pulling off "The Great Escape" to preserve Brentford's Second Division status on the final day of the 2003–04 season.[27][26] Allen assembled a competitive "two bob" team which finished in the playoff positions in the newly named League One in the 2004–05 and 2005–06 seasons and enjoyed two runs to the fifth round of the FA Cup.[28][26] After the playoff failure in May 2006, the side broke up and Allen resigned after failing to secure funding from the board for replacement players.[29] Brentford finished bottom of League One in the 2006–07 season, with Leroy Rosenior at the helm until being replaced by youth team manager Scott Fitzgerald in November 2006.[30]

Terry Butcher was named as manager in April 2007 and a potential double relegation into non-league football was averted by his assistant Andy Scott, who replaced Butcher in December 2007 and steered the club to the League Two championship in the 2008–09 season.[31] Despite runs to the League Cup fourth round and the 2011 Football League Trophy Final,[32][33] Scott was sacked halfway through the 2010–11 season,[34] with Nicky Forster taking over until the end of the campaign.[35] An overhaul of Brentford's management structure by owner Matthew Benham in the 2011 off-season saw Uwe Rösler installed as Brentford's first overseas manager.[36] Rösler took Brentford to the fourth round of the FA Cup and the 2013 League One Playoff Final in the 2012–13 season,[37][38] before leaving in December 2013 and being replaced by former sporting director Mark Warburton,[39] who built on Rösler's good work to secure automatic promotion to the Championship at the end of the 2013–14 season.[40] Warburton's sole season in charge in the Championship ended in a playoff semi-final defeat to Middlesbrough.[41]

2015–present: "Moneyball"[edit]

After a second overhaul of the management structure in four years, Mark Warburton was succeeded by head coach Marinus Dijkhuizen on 1 June 2015.[7] A tumultuous start to the 2015–16 season saw Dijkhuizen replaced after 9 matches by Development Squad manager Lee Carsley,[42] who stabilised the club's league position before Dean Smith was installed as head coach on 30 November 2015.[3][43]

Managers[edit]

Fred Halliday managed Brentford in three spells between 1908 and 1926 and was the club's manager at the time of its election into the Football League in 1920.
Brentford's most successful manager, Harry Curtis masterminded promotions from the Third Division South to the First Division between 1933 and 1935.
Appointed in 2011, Uwe Rösler was Brentford's first manager born outside the British Isles.
Mark Warburton has the highest winning percentage of any manager who has managed 75 or more Brentford matches.
Symbol Meaning
double-dagger Brentford manager in the 2017–18 season.
* Manager has left Brentford but is still managing in a professional league.
Manager also played for the club.
As of match played 6 May 2018. Only competitive matches are counted.
Name Nat From To P W D L Win % Notes Ref
William Lewis (secretary)  England August 1900 May 1903 92 29 16 47 31.52 [44]
Dick Molyneux (secretary)  England August 1903 March 1904 102 33 25 55 32.35 [2]
William Lewis (caretaker)  England March 1904 April 1904 5 0 1 4 0 [nb 1] [45]
Dick Molyneux (secretary)  England April 1904 January 1906 [45]
Bob Crone (caretaker) ♦ Ireland Ireland January 1906 February 1906 [46]
William Brown (secretary)  England February 1906 February 1908 59 23 10 26 38.98 [nb 2] [2]
George Parsonage (caretaker) ♦  England February 1908 May 1908 [nb 3] [47]
Fred Halliday (secretary)  England 24 June 1908 13 November 1912 181 62 36 83 34.25 [48]
Dusty Rhodes  England 14 November 1912 April 1915 87 38 19 30 43.68 [48]
Fred Halliday (secretary)  England August 1915 August 1921 86 24 22 40 27.91 [49]
Archie Mitchell  England August 1921 2 December 1924 154 51 35 69 33.12 [50]
Fred Halliday (secretary)  England 3 December 1924 May 1926 67 22 12 33 32.84 [51]
Harry Curtis (secretary)  England May 1926 February 1949 706 305 157 244 43.2 [52]
Jackie Gibbons (secretary) ♦  England February 1949 August 1952 150 53 40 57 35.33 [53]
Jimmy Bain  Scotland August 1952 January 1953 23 7 5 11 30.43 [54]
Tommy Lawton  England January 1953 September 1953 33 8 10 15 24.24 [55]
Fred Monk (caretaker) ♦  England September 1953 October 1953 2 0 1 1 0 [56]
Bill Dodgin, Sr.  England October 1953 May 1957 183 65 57 61 35.52 [57]
Malky MacDonald  Scotland May 1957 January 1965 380 160 94 126 42.11 [58]
Tommy Cavanagh  England January 1965 April 1966 56 20 12 24 35.71 [59]
Billy Gray  England April 1966 March 1967 55 22 15 18 40 [60]
Jimmy Sirrel  England March 1967 10 November 1969 119 48 27 44 40.34 [nb 4] [61]
Ron Fenton (caretaker) ♦  England 10 November 1969 December 1969 6 2 2 2 33.33 [62]
Frank Blunstone  England December 1969 11 July 1973 180 72 39 69 40 [63]
Mike Everitt  England 16 August 1973 15 January 1975 73 21 22 30 28.77 [64]
Jess Willard (caretaker)  England 15 January 1975 20 January 1975 1 0 1 0 0 [65]
John Docherty  Scotland 20 January 1975 7 September 1976 80 28 22 30 35 [66]
Eddie Lyons (caretaker)  England 7 September 1976 16 September 1976 0 0 1 0 0 [65]
Bill Dodgin, Jr.  England 16 September 1976 1 March 1980 180 73 36 71 40.56 [67]
Fred Callaghan  England 1 March 1980 2 February 1984 205 69 59 77 33.66 [68]
Frank Blunstone (caretaker)  England 2 February 1984 9 February 1984 1 0 0 1 0 [63]
Frank McLintock  Scotland 9 February 1984 24 January 1987 152 51 44 57 33.55 [69]
Steve Perryman  England 25 January 1987 15 August 1990 183 71 49 63 38.8 [70]
Phil Holder  England 24 August 1990 11 May 1993 158 66 33 59 41.77 [71]
David Webb  England 17 May 1993 4 August 1997 216 85 65 66 39.35 [72]
Kevin Lock (caretaker)  England 5 August 1997 12 August 1997 1 0 0 1 0 [73]
Eddie May  England 12 August 1997 5 November 1997 19 5 5 9 26.32 [74]
Micky Adams  England 5 November 1997 1 July 1998 33 7 15 11 21.21 [75]
Ron Noades  England 1 July 1998 20 November 2000 130 51 33 46 39.23 [nb 5] [76]
Ray Lewington  England 20 November 2000 7 May 2001 37 14 11 12 37.84 [77]
Steve Coppell *  England 8 May 2001 5 June 2002 54 27 12 15 50 [78]
Wally Downes  England 28 June 2002 14 March 2004 97 29 22 46 29.9 [79]
Garry Thompson (caretaker)  England 14 March 2004 18 March 2004 1 0 1 0 0 [80]
Martin Allen  England 18 March 2004 31 May 2006 124 54 36 34 43.55 [81]
Leroy Rosenior  Sierra Leone 14 June 2006 18 November 2006 23 3 10 10 13.04 [82]
Scott Fitzgerald  Ireland 18 November 2006 10 April 2007 24 4 5 15 16.67 [nb 4] [83]
Barry Quin (caretaker)  England 10 April 2007 7 May 2007 4 1 0 3 25 [84]
Terry Butcher  England 7 May 2007 11 December 2007 23 5 5 13 21.74 [85]
Andy Scott  England 11 December 2007 3 February 2011 168 64 55 49 38.1 [nb 4] [86]
Nicky Forster  England 3 February 2011 7 May 2011 21 9 5 7 42.86 [nb 4] [87]
Uwe Rösler *  Germany 10 June 2011 7 December 2013 137 60 40 37 43.8 [88]
Alan Kernaghan (caretaker)  Ireland 7 December 2013 9 December 2013 1 0 0 1 0 [89]
Mark Warburton  England 10 December 2013 31 May 2015 78 40 16 22 51.28 [90]
Marinus Dijkhuizen (head coach)  Netherlands 1 June 2015 27 September 2015 9 2 2 5 22.22 [91]
Lee Carsley (head coach)  Ireland 28 September 2015 30 November 2015 10 5 2 3 50 [92]
Dean Smith (head coach) double-dagger  England 30 November 2015 Present 129 51 30 48 39.53 [93]

Assistant Managers[edit]

Symbol Meaning
double-dagger Also managed the club on a permanent basis.
As of 29 May 2017.
Name Nat From To Notes Ref
Alex Graham  Scotland 1925 May 1926 [94]
Dick Hendrie  Scotland 1927 1929 [95]
Jimmy Bain double-dagger  Scotland 1934 1956 [96]
Tommy Cavanagh double-dagger  England 1962 January 1965 [15]
Jimmy Sirrel double-dagger  Scotland February 1965 March 1967 [97]
Fred Callaghan double-dagger  England February 1977 May 1977 [98]
Tommy Baldwin  England 1978 March 1980 [99]
Ron Harris  England 1980 1983 [100]
John Docherty double-dagger  Scotland February 1984 July 1986 [101]
Steve Perryman double-dagger  England November 1986 January 1987 [102]
Phil Holder double-dagger  England January 1987 24 August 1990 [103]
Wilf Rostron  England January 1991 11 May 1993 [104]
Kevin Lock  England 1993 1997 [105]
Clive Walker  England 1997 November 1997 [106]
Glenn Cockerill  England November 1997 June 1998 [107]
Ray Lewington double-dagger  England 1998 20 November 2000 [nb 6] [108]
Terry Bullivant  England 20 November 2000 2001 [109]
Wally Downes double-dagger  England 2001 8 August 2002 [110]
Garry Thompson  England October 2002 20 March 2004 [111]
Adrian Whitbread  England 30 March 2004 31 May 2006 [112]
Paul Mortimer  England 16 June 2006 18 November 2006 [113]
Alan Reeves  England 21 December 2006 10 April 2007 [114]
Andy Scott double-dagger  England 9 May 2007 11 December 2007 [115]
Scott Marshall  Scotland 12 December 2007 10 March 2008 [nb 7]
Terry Bullivant  England 11 March 2008 3 February 2011 [116]
Mark Warburton double-dagger  England 3 February 2011 7 May 2011 [117]
Alan Kernaghan  Ireland 24 February 2012 7 December 2013 [118]
David Weir  Scotland 16 December 2013 31 May 2015 [119]
Roy Hendriksen (assistant coach)  Netherlands 1 June 2015 27 September 2015 [120]
Paul Williams (assistant coach)  England 28 September 2015 30 November 2015 [42]
Richard O'Kelly (assistant coach)  England 30 November 2015 Present [3]
Thomas Frank (assistant coach)  Denmark 8 December 2016 Present [121]

Records[edit]

Awards[edit]

Football League Manager of the Month[edit]

Name Nationality Second tier Third tier Fourth tier Total Ref
Micky Adams  England March 1998 1 [122]
Martin Allen  England September 2004, February 2006 2 [123]
Frank Blunstone  England September 1971, March 1972 2 [124]
Lee Carsley  Ireland October 2015 1 [43]
Steve Coppell  England October 2001 1 [125]
John Docherty  Scotland April 1975 1 [126]
Bill Dodgin, Jr.  England March 1978 1 [127]
Wally Downes  England August 2002 1 [128]
Phil Holder  England December 1992 December 1990, November 1991, April 1992 4 [129]
Ron Noades  England August 1998 1 [25]
Steve Perryman  England January 1989 1 [130]
Uwe Rösler  Germany November 2013 1 [131]
Andy Scott  England October 2010 April 2009 2 [132]
Mark Warburton  England November 2014 December 2013 2 [133]
David Webb  England January 1995, August 1996 2 [134]

Other awards[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ In late 1903, Dick Molyneux was suspended until the end of the 1903–04 season for illegally trying to buy goalkeeper John Bishop out of the Army. His role was covered by William Lewis.
  2. ^ Southern League statistics only.
  3. ^ Served as player-manager.
  4. ^ a b c d Initially as caretaker manager.
  5. ^ Also served as chairman between June 1998 and March 2003.
  6. ^ Lewington led a three-man coaching team, which also included Terry Bullivant and Brian Sparrow.
  7. ^ Marshall assisted Andy Scott while continuing in his role as youth team manager.

References[edit]

General
  • Haynes, Graham; Coumbe, Frank (2006). Timeless Bees: Brentford F.C. Who's Who 1920–2006. Harefield: Yore Publications. ISBN 0955294916. 
  • Haynes, Graham (1998). A-Z Of Bees: Brentford Encyclopaedia. Harefield: Yore Publications. ISBN 1 874427 57 7. 
  • White, Eric, ed. (1989). 100 Years Of Brentford. Oldfield Press. ISBN 0 9515262 0 0. 
Specific
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Football Club History Database – Brentford". www.fchd.info. Retrieved 28 July 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Haynes & Coumbe 2006, p. 174-175.
  3. ^ a b c "Brentford appoint Dean Smith as Head Coach". www.brentfordfc.co.uk. Retrieved 30 November 2015. 
  4. ^ a b History. "Brentford FC History". www.brentfordfc.co.uk. Retrieved 30 July 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Haynes & Coumbe 2006, p. 176.
  6. ^ "Brentford FC club statement 17.02.2015". www.brentfordfc.co.uk. Retrieved 12 January 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Wickham, Chris. "Brentford FC appoint Marinus Dijkhuizen from S.B.V. Excelsior as Head Coach assisted by Roy Hendriksen". www.brentfordfc.co.uk. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  8. ^ White 1989, p. 56.
  9. ^ White 1989, p. 58.
  10. ^ White 1989, p. 67.
  11. ^ White 1989, p. 68.
  12. ^ Haynes & Coumbe 1998, p. 119.
  13. ^ Haynes & Coumbe 1998, p. 84.
  14. ^ a b Haynes & Coumbe 2006, p. 177.
  15. ^ a b c d e Haynes & Coumbe 2006, p. 178.
  16. ^ a b Haynes & Coumbe 2006, p. 186-189.
  17. ^ Haynes 1998, p. 102.
  18. ^ Haynes & Coumbe 2006, p. 47-48.
  19. ^ a b c Haynes & Coumbe 2006, p. 179.
  20. ^ Haynes 1998, p. 123-125.
  21. ^ Haynes & Coumbe 2006, p. 180.
  22. ^ Haynes & Coumbe 2006, p. 181.
  23. ^ a b c d Haynes & Coumbe 2006, p. 182.
  24. ^ a b c Haynes & Coumbe 2006, p. 183.
  25. ^ a b c d e Haynes & Coumbe 2006, p. 184.
  26. ^ a b c Haynes & Coumbe 2006, p. 185.
  27. ^ "Brentford appoint Allen". BBC. 18 March 2004. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  28. ^ "The 13 maddest managers ever: silly superstitions, star signs and Sitton | FourFourTwo". www.fourfourtwo.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  29. ^ "Brentford accept Allen departure". BBC. 2 June 2006. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  30. ^ "Rosenior sacked as Brentford boss". BBC. 18 November 2006. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  31. ^ "Boss Butcher leaves Brentford job". BBC. 11 December 2007. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  32. ^ "Brentford 1–1 Everton (4–3 pens)". BBC. 21 September 2010. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  33. ^ "Brentford 0–1 Carlisle". BBC. 3 April 2011. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  34. ^ "Brentford part company with Scott". BBC. 3 February 2011. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  35. ^ "Bees' Forster confirms retirement". BBC. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  36. ^ "Rosler named as Brentford manager". BBC. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  37. ^ "Chelsea 4–0 Brentford". BBC. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  38. ^ "Brentford 1–2 Yeovil". BBC. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  39. ^ "Warburton appointed Brentford boss". BBC. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  40. ^ "Brentford 2–0 Stevenage". BBC. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  41. ^ "Middlesbrough 3–0 Brentford". BBC. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  42. ^ a b FC, Brentford. "Brentford FC statement on Head Coach: Marinus Dijkhuizen leaves Brentford Football Club". www.brentfordfc.co.uk. Retrieved 28 September 2015. 
  43. ^ a b "Lee Carsley named Sky Bet Championship Manager of the Month". www.brentfordfc.co.uk. Retrieved 30 November 2015. 
  44. ^ White 1989, p. 356-357.
  45. ^ a b Haynes 1998, p. 12.
  46. ^ White 1989, p. 86-87.
  47. ^ Brentford's Official Matchday Magazine versus Luton Town 24/08/96. 1996. p. 24. 
  48. ^ a b White 1989, p. 360-363.
  49. ^ White 1989, p. 365-366.
  50. ^ "Archie Mitchell | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  51. ^ White 1989, p. 368.
  52. ^ "Harry Curtis | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  53. ^ "Jackie Gibbons | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  54. ^ "Jimmy Blain | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  55. ^ "Tommy Lawton | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  56. ^ White 1989, p. 212.
  57. ^ "Bill Dodgin(Snr) | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  58. ^ "Malcolm MacDonald | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  59. ^ "Tommy Cavanagh | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  60. ^ "Billy Gray | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  61. ^ "Jimmy Sirrel | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  62. ^ White 1989, p. 275.
  63. ^ a b "Frank Blunstone | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  64. ^ "Mike Everitt | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  65. ^ a b Official Brentford Programme 2006/2007 versus Leyton Orient 31/0107. Dunwoody Sports Publishing. 2007. pp. 38–39. 
  66. ^ "John Docherty | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  67. ^ "Bill Dodgin(Jnr) | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  68. ^ "Fred Callaghan | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  69. ^ "Frank McLintock | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  70. ^ "Steve Perryman | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  71. ^ "Phil Holder | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  72. ^ "David Webb | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  73. ^ Croxford, Lane & Waterman 2013, p. 240.
  74. ^ "Eddie May | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
  75. ^ "Mickey Adams | Latest Betting Odds | Soccer Base". www.soccerbase.com. Retrieved 29 July 2015. 
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